comics art Archives - Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

March brings more MODOK than the law allows

MODOK_yourMarch2014!_CON_2

March brings not only strong winds and NCAA brackets, but also March MODOK Madness, the annual celebration of all things MODOK.

For the past several years, the March MODOK Madness blog has celebrated the big-headed villain by enlisting various artists to draw his MODOK-ness in all his glory. Marc has hardly started and already they have three posts up, including a frozen MODOK (why isn’t MODOK on an ice cream bar?), a team-up with Dr. Doofenshmirtz and Mark Monlux’s awesome Easter MODOK (seen below).

Be sure to check in with them all month for more MODOK artwork.

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Early Superman cover art sells for $286,800

action comics15-cover artThe earliest original Superman cover art known to exist sold at auction over the weekend for $286,800, exceeding early estimates.

Fred Guardineer’s cover for Action Comics #15 (dated August 1939), on the fifth cover appearance of the Man of Steel, depicts the superhero aiding a distressed U.S. submarine on the ocean floor. It was purchased by Richard Evans of Bedrock City Comic Company in Houston.

“Guardineer’s cover is the earliest Superman cover art in existence, and an absolute treasure of comics history,” Ed Jaster, senior vice president of Heritage Auctions, said in a statement. “A price like this shows just how much collectors covet a rarity like this.”

A prolific Golden Age writer and artist, Guardineer created Zatara, whose first appearance in Action Comics #1 was overshadowed by the debut of Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster’s Superman.

The Feb. 20-22 auction in New York City featured more than 1,200 lots, including the second part of the Don and Maggie Thompson collection. Highlights included: a near-mint copy of Amazing Fantasy #15, which sold for $191,200; Jack Kirby and Frank Giacola’s original cover art for Tales of Suspense #84, which fetched$167,300; and R. Crumb’s original art for the three-page story “Ducks Yas Yas” from Zap Comix #0, which went for $101,575.

1966 original ‘Peanuts’ daily strip sells for $26,450

peanuts auction

A 1966 original daily Peanuts comic strip from fetched $26,450 at auction earlier this month, surpassing pre-sale estimates of between $15,000 and $20,000.

Featuring Peppermint Patty, Linus and Snoopy, the strip was the top-grossing item in a multi-estate auction held Jan. 18 in Lynbrook, New York, by Philip Weiss Auctions. The auction was devoted primarily to Golden Age comic books, sports memorabilia and comics art, along with some original Disney production cels and paintings.

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Denys Cowan’s missing original art has been returned

SONY DSCDenys Cowan has recovered all 27 pieces of original art lost early last month by UPS en route to the Geppi Entertainment Museum in Baltimore.

“I’m elated,” the artist wrote Friday on his Facebook page, “but also dismayed because of the condition of some of the artwork.”

The art had been headed to “Milestones: African Americans in Comics Pop Culture & Beyond,” an exhibit curated by Milestone co-founder Michael Davis, who revealed the loss, and his frustrations with UPS, last month. The box of Cowan’s original art, along with a separate package belonging to Davis, were sent for overnight delivery; however, Cowan’s shipment was delayed en route, with no explanation. When the package arrived, with new tape used to reseal it, just one of the 28 pieces of artwork remained — leading Davis and others to conclude that they weren’t “lost,” but rather stolen.

Among the missing art were interior pages from Hardware and Steel, concept pieces for Static, Rocket and Hardware, and pieces featuring Batman.

Davis was joined by museum owner Steve Geppi, who’s also CEO of Diamond Comic Distributors, and museum president Melissa Geppi-Bowersox in pressuring UPS for an explanation, and in contacting art dealers and collectors to spread the news of the loss.

In an open letter posted Friday on his Facebook page, Cowan offered his thanks to everyone who offered support and provided help:

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Comics A.M. | Linework NW comics festival set for Portland

Linework NW

Linework NW

Conventions | The standalone Stumptown Comics Fest may be history, but an event has popped up to help fill the void: Linework NW, organized by Zack Soto and Francois Vigneault, a free, one-day show that will take place April 12 in Portland, Oregon. Michael DeForge has been announced as a special guest for the event, which will include such exhibitors as Fantagraphics, Koyama Press, Oni Press and Top Shelf Productions. [The Comics Reporter]

Creators | Scott Snyder is the subject of a glowing profile in The New York Times, which states the writer has “reinvented Batman in the past two years, deepening and humanizing the Dark Knight’s myth — in the making since 1939 — like no one since Frank Miller in the 1980s.” [The New York Times]

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Denys Cowan’s original art lost during shipping

denys cowanTwenty-seven pieces of original art by Denys Cowan were lost in shipment earlier this month to “Milestones: African Americans in Comics Pop Culture & Beyond,” an exhibit at the Geppi Entertainment Museum in Baltimore.

Milestone co-founder Michael Davis, curator of the show, writes that when they handed off the box for delivery by UPS, it contained 28 pieces of art; when it arrived in Baltimore, it contained just one.

“Included were irreplaceable work from original Milestone concept drawings to Batman #400 pages other works from both before and after those career highlights,” Davis explains.  Now they’re gone, he writes, “Perhaps, forever.”

“The art was either stolen or ‘fell out,’” he concludes. “I’m sure it was stolen, someone opened the box, opened the plastic took the art except for one, resealed the box, badly and sent it along it’s merry way. I can’t say that for a fact because I was not there when it went missing. I also can’t say for fact slavery is bad as I’ve never been a slave but I’m pretty sure it is.”

The “Milestones” exhibit continues through April.

Comics A.M. | Al Plastino seeks judge’s help with return of art

Superman's Mission for President Kennedy

Superman’s Mission for President Kennedy

Legal | Artist Al Plastino has asked a New York judge to order Heritage Auctions to reveal the name of the consignor who put up for sale his original art for the 10-page story “Superman’s Mission for President Kennedy.” Heritage says the sale has been canceled and the art returned to the consignor, who bought it at a Sotheby’s auction a decade ago. The JFK story was originally scheduled to run in a DC comic dated November 1963, but it was quickly pulled when Kennedy was assassinated. The story was published the following year at the request of the Johnson administration. The last panel of the comic stated the artwork was to be donated to the Kennedy Library, and Plastino believed that to be the case until this fall, when he discovered it was being put up for auction. [Reuters]

Crime | Tokyo police say they have security camera footage of a suspicious man in a mask and gloves near a convenience store where a small amount of nicotine was found in a Kuroko’s Basketball-themed snack. The snacks were recalled after 7-Eleven and other convenience store chains received threatening letters, part of a barrage of threat letters that have been sent out to venues associated with the Kuroko’s Basketball manga and anime. The amount of nicotine found in the Kuroko’s Basketball wafers was well under a lethal dose. [Anime News Network]

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Parents draw amazing napkin art for their sons’ lunches each day

kirby-napkin4

On a couple of occasions we’ve spotlighted parents who illustrate their children’s lunch bags, but I’m pretty sure this is the first time we’ve seen napkins as canvases: Laughing Squid points us to the Kirbys, who include intricately drawn paper napkins with their sons’ `daily lunches, many of which feature comics characters, Futurama or The Simpsons (and occasionally mash-ups of two of those).

“We make these colored napkins daily for our sons’ lunches. They are both in grade school,” the Kirbys explain. “We started these with our first son in first grade, many years ago, and continue to make at least 2 a day (to stay current!). These napkins have become fun to share with their tablemates, classes, and teachers. These images are typically ink on white napkins. Some napkins have been for friends or differing occasions.”

Check out some of the comics-themed drawings below, and many, many more on their blog.

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