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‘4 Kids Walk Into a Bank’ HeroesCon variant to benefit Equality NC

4kids-social

It’s a classic ethical dilemma: Is it better to boycott a state — in this case, North Carolina — for a discriminatory law or support those who are fighting it? Matthew Rosenberg and Tyler Boss, creators of the new series 4 Kids Walk Into a Bank, decided to take the second route.

They’ll attend HeroesCon this weekend in Charlotte, North Carolina, where they’ll sell a limited edition of 4 Kids Walk Into a Bank #1, featuring a cover by Josh Hixson, with proceeds going to benefit Equality NC.

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Comics A.M. | Maggin, Hughes, to receive Bill Finger Awards

Herbie the Fat Fury

Herbie the Fat Fury

Awards | A committee chaired by writer and historian Mark Evanier has chosen Elliot S! Maggin and Richard E. Hughes as the recipients of this year’s Bill Finger Awards, which honor writers whose work has not gotten the recognition it deserves. Maggin is a longtime comics writer whose credits include Green Arrow, Batman, Justice League, Peter Parker, Strange Sports Stories, and the Marvel Classics version of The Iliad. Hughes, who died in 1974, was a prolific writer who worked under a number of pen names. He created The Black Terror for Standard Comics in the 1940s and later became editor at American Comics Group, where he scripted many comics. He is the co-creator of Herbie Popnecker, the Fat Fury, who later got his own comic. The awards will be presented at the Eisner Awards ceremony at Comic-Con International in San Diego. [Comic-Con International]

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Comics A.M. | Fan selling comics collection to pay for child’s college

collection-social

Fandom | Al Sanders started collecting comics when he was in grade school, at one point selling plasma to support his hobby. . Over the years he amassed a collection of 5,000 comics, all from 1990 or earlier, including such popular titles as Batman and X-Men. But all good things must come to an end, and with his daughter Rose heading to college next year, Sanders has decided it’s time to sell his collection. He’s heading this weekend to Emerald City Comicon, where he hopes to turn the comics into cold cash. He’s not being totally mercenary about this, however: “I just hope someone can enjoy them, as much as me.” The report indicates Sanders believes his collection is in mint condition; he may discover otherwise once he talks to dealers at the convention. [12 News]

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Comics A.M. | Irving Fine, founder of Siegel and Shuster Society, dies

Jerry Siegel's childhood home (courtesy of the Siegel and Shuster Society)

Jerry Siegel’s childhood home (courtesy of the Siegel and Shuster Society)

Passings | Irving Fine, cousin of Superman co-creator Jerry Siegel and founder of the Siegel and Shuster Society, passed away March 11 at his home in suburban Cleveland. He was 87. Fine, whose late brother introduced Siegel to Joe Shuster in the 1930s, made preserving and promoting Superman’s ties to Cleveland a priority: During his tenure as co-chairman of the Siegel and Shuster Society, Ohio introduced a Superman-themed license plate, Cleveland Hopkins International Airport installed a Superman Welcome Center, and Siegel’s childhood home was restored. Michael Sangiacomo notes that Fine also played a key role in the plans for a monument to Superman and his creators, set to be unveiled in 2018 near the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. [Cleveland Plain Dealer]

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Comics A.M. | Sydney, Australia’s oldest comic store is closing

comic kingdom

Retailing | After nearly 30 years in business, Comic Kingdom — the oldest comic store in Sydney, Australia — will close its doors for good. Clayton Wildridge, who’s worked at the store for two decades and now manages it, points the finger at digital comics: “The culture has changed. It’s all internet and downloads now. The last thing I read said readership of comics was actually up, but purchases of hard copies were down. People download them instead and read them on the phone.” [The Daily Telegraph]

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Comics A.M. | Japan’s Kadokawa expands its digital reach

Tokyo Ravens, Vol. 1

Tokyo Ravens, Vol. 1

Digital comics | Japanese publisher Kadokawa will relaunch its English-language e-book service BookWalker on Oct. 8 with 700 new manga and light novel titles. BookWalker, which includes a website and iOS and Android apps, debuted last year with a library of Kadokawa books, including Sgt. Frog and Neon Genesis Evangelion, some of which have also been published by Viz Media and Dark Horse. The new site will include a wider range of books from other Japanese and North American publishers. Kadokawa also runs ComicWalker site, which offers free chapters of manga in English. [Anime News Network]

Creators | Colin McEnroe interviews Zippy creator Bill Griffith about his new book, Invisible Ink, which is the story of his late mother’s affair with a cartoonist — or, as McEnroe puts it, “Zippy Meets Freud.” [NPR]

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What other covers feature a ton of characters?

Deadpool.27.Cover

Deadpool #27 made headlines yesterday when it was announced that the cover had set the record for the most comic book characters on a single issue cover, as declared officially by Guinness World Records. It also brought a lot of discussion in our comments, as fans asked what the previous record holder was and if, indeed, it truly beat out every other cover out there as depicting the “most comic book characters on a single issue cover.”

So I thought maybe we should take a look at some of the candidates folks pointed out …

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Wish This Was Real | Les McClaine’s adventures of young Doc Fiveash

Les McClaine (Middleman, The Tick, that incredibly awesome Batman poster) has a webcomic called Jonny Crossbones about the adventures of a skeleton-suited mechanic and the niece of a wealthy adventurer. They hunt pirate treasure in the first story and you should read it, but that’s not what this is about. It’s about these outstanding Tintin-esque covers that McClaine created to go on the wall of one of the characters in his comic. The character is Father Muzzey, companion to the aforementioned wealthy adventurer, and the covers depict the duo fighting Egyptian sewer-monsters, hunting Nosferatu and having their own version of a Nancy Drew adventure … with sledgehammers.

I’d read any of these, but the fact of the matter is that Johnny Crossbones is already very Hergé-like itself. Okay, maybe this post is about how you should go read that.

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