Dave Gibbons Archives - Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

Comics A.M. | ‘Attack on Titan’ tops 2.5 million copies in English

Attack on Titan, Vol. 12

Attack on Titan, Vol. 12

Manga | More than 2.5 million copies of the English-language editions of Attack on Titan in print, Kodansha USA announced earlier this month at Anime Expo. Although that may seem like a lot, there are more than 44 million copies of the same 15 volumes of Hajime Isayama’s post-apocalyptic manga in print in Japan. The Asahi Shimbun estimates the U.S. comics market as one-fifth the size of the Japanese market. [The Asahi Shimbun]

Passings | Bill Garner, the editorial cartoonist for The Washington Times from 1983 to 2009, has died at age 79. Garner was born in Texas and attended the Texas School of Fine Arts, then went to the University of Texas at Austin for one year. He served in the Army from 1956 to 1962, then went to work as an illustrator for The Washington Star. His editor there suggested he try his hand at cartooning, and it took. He moved on to become the editorial cartoonist for the Memphis Commercial Appeal, where in 1981 he won a National Headliner Award. His best-known cartoon is one he drew for the Times shortly after the overthrow of Saddam Hussein, showing a tank with the bumper sticker “Saddam Happens” driving over a sand dune.  [The Washington Times]

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Dave Gibbons and Ewbank’s auction artwork for charity

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“Watchmen” artist and co-collaborator Dave Gibbons is auctioning off his “Whaat?” piece of diptych artwork – a parody of a Roy Lichenstein piece – on June 25 as part of an Ewbank’s auction, the proceeds of which will be donated to the Hero Initiative.

Part of 2013’s “Image Duplicator” exhibit curated by Rian Hughes at Orbital Comics in London, “Whaat?” came in response to a Lichenstein exhibit of “appropriated” comic art at the Tate Modern gallery in London. The Lichenstein exhibit gained a lot of controversy for using other artists’ work without giving them fair compensation or credit.

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Comics A.M. | Viz to bring popular ‘One-Punch Man’ to print

One-Punch Man

One-Punch Man

Manga | Viz Media announced Friday it will publish a print edition of One-Punch Man, which managed to garner an Eisner nomination in its digital-only format. Zainab Akhtar provides some background on the book and reproduces a review by David Brothers. [Comics and Cola]

Conventions | Scott Eric Kaufman follows Devin Pike, one of the organizers of Dallas Comic Con, throughout the three-day event and gets a good look at what goes on behind the scenes: “As I witnessed these lines [of fans] snakes down corridors and spill into causeways, they began to seem like a physical manifestation of the passion fans have invested in these individuals and the iconic characters they’ve played, and it’s up to people like Devin to ensure that that passion is rewarded with an experience that is, if not equal to it, at least a reflection of it.” [Salon]

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‘DHP’ #200 will include ‘Masks’ by Gillian Flynn & Dave Gibbons

guardian-masks

Dark Horse will celebrate the 200th issue of Dark Horse Presents in February with an 80-page installment that includes the first U.S. publication of “Masks,” a short story by Gone Girl author Gillian Flynn and veteran artist Dave Gibbons.

The story, about a mother turned masked vigilante, originally appeared in April as part of The Guardian’s celebration of the opening of the “Comics Unmasked: Art and Anarchy in the U.K.” exhibition at the British Museum. “Masks” marks Flynn’s comics debut.

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Dave Gibbons named comics laureate by U.K. literacy group

dave gibbonsAcclaimed Watchmen co-creator Dave Gibbons has been named the United Kingdom’s first comics laureate by the new advocacy group Comics Literary Awareness (CLAw).

The announcement was made Friday by Scott McCloud during the launch of the organization at the Lakes International Comic Art Festival in Kendal, England. CLAw is dedicated to improving literacy among children through comics while promoting the variety and quality of the medium.

According to the group, the title of comics laureate will be bestowed every two years to a comics writer or artist in recognition of outstanding achievement in the field. In that role, the creator will champion children’s literacy through school visits and education conferences. Gibbons will begin his term in February.

“It’s a great honor for me to be nominated as the first Comics Laureate,” Gibbons said in a statement. “I intend to do all that I can to promote the acceptance of comics in schools. It’s vitally important not only for the pupils but for the industry too.” Dave Gibbons takes up his position from February 2015.

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Dr. Manhattan charged with trying to steal bicycle

manhattan

He may tired of Earth, these people and being caught in the tangle of their lives, but even Dr. Manhattan can’t resist the siren’s call of Wal-Mart and its low, low prices. Or at least its conveniently placed bicycles.

The Orlando Sentinel reports that a 27-year-old Jacksonville, Florida, man was charged Tuesday with petit theft after he allegedly tried to walk off with a $130 bike from an Orlando-area Wal-Mart.

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Read all six strips from The Guardian’s Weekend comics special

From "Art And Anarchy," by Michel Faber and Roger Langridge

From “Art And Anarchy,” by Michel Faber and Roger Langridge

If you’re looking for some Monday reading, The Guardian has released online all six comics created for the special issue of its Weekend magazine that brought together novelists like Gillian Flynn, Audrey Niffenegger and Margaret Atwood with comics artists like Dave Gibbons, Frazer Irving and Christian Ward. There are also articles in which Dave Eggers, Roger Langridge and Michel Faber, and Flynn offer a bit of insight into their contributions.

The issue, released in print on Saturday, is designed to celebrate he British Library’s upcoming exhibition “Comics Unmasked: Art and Anarchy in the U.K.”

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The Guardian brings together novelists, artists for comics issue

guardian-masks

From “Masks” by Flynn and Gibbons

To celebrate the British Library’s upcoming exhibition “Comics Unmasked: Art and Anarchy in the U.K.,” The Guardian’s Weekend magazine is devoting Saturday’s issue the medium, with six new collaborations between well-known novelists and established comics artists.

The Guardian website has already debuted Do You Hear What I Hear? by A.M. Homes (The End of Alice) and Frazer Irving, and Masks by Gillian Flynn (Gone Girl) and Dave Gibbons. Still to come: Freeforall by Margaret Atwood and Christian Ward; Thursdays, 6-8pm by Audrey Niffenegger (The Time Traveler’s Wife) and Eddie Campbell; Having renewed my fire by Dave Eggers (A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius); and Art and anarchy by Michel Faber (The Crimson Petal and the White) and Roger Langridge.

The magazine will appear in print on Saturday.

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Does Disney’s ‘Frozen’ pay homage to ‘Watchmen’?

watchmen-let it go

While Adele Dazeem’s Idina Menzel’s performance of “Let It Go” from Frozen is inescapable (and downright catchy), I’d somehow missed widespread speculation that the big scene from Disney’s latest animated blockbuster is an elaborate homage to the Mars sequence from Watchmen by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons.

It’s already inspired some mashups, but now Slate’s Forrest Wickman draws our attention to one that may just erase any doubts, ending the debate once and for all (or, y’know, not): Alex Wolinetz‘s combination of the song’s lyrics with Gibbons’ panels depicting a self-exiled Doctor Manhattan. (You can see the rest of the mashup at Slate.com.)

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Comics A.M. | British Library to stage largest exhibit of UK comics

The Trials of Nasty Tales

The Trials of Nasty Tales

Events | The British Library is staging a “long overdue” exhibit on comics, called “Comics Unmasked: Art and Anarchy in the U.K.,” which will feature comics in a variety of genres from the 19th century to the present. Featured items include The Trials of Nasty Tales, which chronicles the 1972 obscenity trial of the editorial staff of Nasty Tales. “I went to a very traditional school where they would raid desks and take comics off to the orchard to burn them,” said Dave Gibbons, one of the contributors to The Trials of Nasty Tales. “Fast forward 40 years and they now invite me to the school to lecture on graphic novels.” The exhibition runs May 2-Aug. 14. [The Guardian]

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Comics A.M. | Small Press Expo table lottery begins Friday

SPX

SPX

Conventions | Registration begins Friday for the Small Press Expo 2014 Exhibitor Table Lottery, a new system designed to both bring the old process into the 21st century and address rapidly increasing demand. Online registration will continue through Feb. 14, with lottery winners announced on Feb. 21. There’s a good deal of information to absorb, but convention organizers have created a lottery FAQ. [SPX]

Publishing | Reports of the demise of Ape Entertainment turns out to have been premature. The company, which had one of the bestselling digital comics a few years ago with Pocket God, has been quiet of late and recently canceled a number of outstanding orders. However, COO Brett Erwin emerged Tuesday to say the publisher is simply going through a period of reorganization after the departure of CEO David Hedgecock, who now works for IDW. Ape will release a new Fruit Ninja comic at the end of the month. [The Beat]

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Comics A.M. | Cartoonist summoned after offending Ecuador’s president

Xavier Bonilla

Xavier Bonilla

Legal | Ecuadorean cartoonist Xavier Bonilla has received a court summons on unspecified charges that seem to relate to a cartoon that President Rafael Correa finds offensive. The case was brought by Ecuador’s new media regulator; Correa has stepped up attacks on the press in recent years, and the newspaper that runs Bonilla’s cartoons, El Universo, has been prosecuted in the past. [Business Standard]

Censorship | Michael Dooley looks at successful and unsuccessful attempts to remove comics from schools and libraries over the past 13 years; this short roundup is informative in its own right, and it’s apparently a sidebar to a longer article that’s not available for free. [Print Magazine]

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Comics A.M. | Case of Sherlock Holmes rights isn’t over just yet

Sherlock Holmes: The Liverpool Demon #2

Sherlock Holmes: The Liverpool Demon #2

Legal | As the dust begins to settle on the ruling last month by a federal judge that Arthur Conan Doyle’s first 50 Sherlock Holmes stories have lapsed into the public domain in the United States, out march the analyses pointing out the buts. Chief among them, of course, is the possibility of appeal by the Conan Doyle estate, which contends the characters were effectively incomplete until the author’s final story was published in the United States (the 10 stories published after Jan. 1, 1923, remain under copyright in this country until 2022).

However, Publishers Weekly notes that because U.S. District Judge Ruben Castillo didn’t rule directly on that “novel” argument, the estate may be satisfied with the ambiguity of the decision, given that uncertain creators still may seek to license the characters to steer clear of any trouble. Estate lawyer Benjamin Allison also insists that the Sherlock Holmes trademarks remain unaffected, an assertion that puzzles author and scholar Leslie Klinger, who brought the lawsuit. “There is a very good reason why the Estate did not assert trademark protection: The Estate does not own any trademarks,” he told PW. “They have applied for them, and there will be substantial opposition.” There’s more at NPR, The Independent and The Atlantic. [Publishers Weekly]

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David Roach displays ‘the rarest collectible in the comics history’

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I’m very fond of the output of artist David Roach. The Welshman has been an on-off contributor to 2000AD since 1988, as well as regularly working as an inker on the strip features in Doctor Who Magazine. I don’t remember him working much recently in the United States, where he regularly turned up at DC and Dark Horse both as a penciler and inker.  He comes from a family of academics, and has been developing a parallel career of late as something of a comic book and illustration historian.

Roach regularly uses his Facebook page as an art blog, showcasing artists of all stripes, just as likely to be a fine artist as a comic illustrator, as well as occasionally featuring art from his own collection. This week he has been displaying scans from what he calls “surely the rarest collectible in the comics history.”

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Comics A.M. | DiDio & Lee on digital, variants & creator turnover

Jim Lee

Jim Lee

Publishing | ICv2 has one of its periodic Big Interviews with DC Co-Publishers Dan DiDio and Jim Lee, this time covering how new readers are finding digital comics, how variant covers are working and graphic novel sales in bookstores, among other topics. Here’s Lee’s rather elliptical take on the flurry of recent changes in creative teams: “Without getting into the specifics, from the outside looking in, it might look like there’s a string of changes that point to one common theme, as you suggest. But from the inside looking out, you’ll see that each one has a different set of circumstances and conditions that ultimately led to the conflicts or the resignations or changes in creative personnel.” [ICv2]

Retailing | ICv2 also reports that Amazon and Overstock.com are having a price war on graphic novels, and readers are the beneficiaries. The website did a little shopping around and found a handful of graphic novels priced at up to 70 percent off full retail. [ICv2]

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