DC Comics Archives - Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

Grumpy Old Fan | No foolin’, DC starts ‘Converging’ in April

HAPPY NOW?!?

HAPPY NOW?!?

In our current age of instant accessibility to an unimaginable library of entertainment, it’s difficult to imagine the hold that broadcast television once had on the culture. In the 1970s, people stayed home on Saturday nights to watch the CBS comedy lineup of Mary Tyler Moore, Bob Newhart, and Carol Burnett. On Tuesdays, ABC had Happy Days and Laverne & Shirley. Of course, NBC owned Thursday nights for decades, from The Cosby Show, Cheers and L.A. Law in the ‘80s to Seinfeld, Mad About You, Friends, ER and The Office in the ‘90s and ‘00s.

Now imagine that NBC — which has since conceded Thursday to ABC’s now-dominant block of “Shondaland” dramas — will be replacing two months’ worth of regular Thursday programming with new episodes of the shows that typified “Must See TV.” Would you want to check in on Sam Malone, George Costanza, Ross & Rachel, or the doctors of Chicago General after all this time? Maybe, maybe not.

Well, for good or ill, that’s the bet DC Comics is making with the comics marketplace in April and May, by bringing back characters (and versions of characters) that haven’t been seen in anywhere from three to 30 years. Will readers want to check in with those characters, even if they’re the only DC game in town? Maybe, maybe not. It depends, I suspect, on some unquantifiable combination of character, creative team, and reader attachment to either or both. At long last, the first batch of Convergence solicitations is here, and today we’ll run through them.
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Kotobukiya conjures Zatanna Bishoujo statue

zatanna9-cropped

Kotobukiya has unveiled the latest addition to its line of DC Comics Bishoujo statues: Zatanna.

Sculpted by Sculpted by Takaboku Busujima (Busujimax) from character art created by Shunya Yamashita, the statue stands a little less than 10 inches tall. Here’s how Kotobukiya describes it:

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Original ‘hit list’ reveals a very different ‘Infinite Crisis’

infinite crisis

The 2005-2006 DC Comics crossover Infinite Crisis may be best remembered for Superboy-Prime’s “continuity punch,” and for a staggeringly high body count. However, it turns out that figure could’ve been a little higher, and perhaps even more controversial.

While cleaning his basement, DC Comics Co-Publisher Dan DiDio uncovered the original whiteboard pages laying out the event’s timeline, as well as a “hit list’ (below), which is exactly what it sounds like — a rundown of characters marked for death.

“Always fun to see where we started now that we know where it ended up,” DiDio wrote on his Facebook page.

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Marvel takes jab at 2013 DC with “WTD Certified” promo

April_is_WTD_Certifiedcrop

Two years ago this month, DC Comics announced that all of its April 2013 New 52 releases would be “WTF Certified,” its name for a series of gatefold covers poised to reveal surprising developments when folded out. The promotion drew some criticism, stemming from the fact that the “F” in “WTF” stands for a word you won’t find in any of DC’s superhero comics. Ultimately, while DC went forward with the gatefold covers themselves, the “WTF Certified” branding was abandoned.

Marvel showed they haven’t forgotten any of that with the release of a “WTD Certified” teaser image on Thursday afternoon, closely mimicking DC’s scrapped “WTF” logo. What exactly “WTD” stands for in this instance is unclear, though “What the Deadpool” is an easy first guess (he’s dying that month, after all). An answer should be coming soon — “WTD Certified” is tied to April’s releases, and Marvel’s solicitations for that month are likely to hit early next week. The full teaser follows below.

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Grumpy Old Fan | ‘Crisis’ at 30, Part 2

Not pictured: Anthro or the Legion

Not pictured: Anthro or the Legion

Last month marked the 30th anniversary of the first issue of Crisis on Infinite Earths, the ur-Big Event whose ripples continue to influence today’s (and tomorrow’s) superhero books. Accordingly, I thought it was a good time to revisit each issue on its approximate anniversary. That’s not because each issue of COIE was always a landmark unto itself, but because we tend to remember Crisis’ effects more than the ways in which the story was told.

Thus, it’s time for Issue 2, which was published in the direct market during the first week of January 1985. The issue was written by Marv Wolfman, penciled by George Pérez, inked by Dick Giordano, colored by Tony Tollin and lettered by John Costanza. Wolfman is listed as the issue’s editor, with Bob Greenberger as his associate editor (and co-plotter, according to COIE: The Compendium) and Len Wein as consulting editor.

* * *

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Fans petition White House for ‘Flash Appreciation Day’

flash and substance

If Central City can honor the Fastest Man Alive with “Flash Appreciation Day,” why shouldn’t the entire country? That’s the thrust of a new We the People petition that asks President Obama to pay tribute to the superhero on Feb. 11.

It’s an idea hatched by the contributors to the blog Nothing But Comics, who note the date is already celebrated annually by some Flash fans, who drew inspiration from a Season 2 episode of Justice League Unlimited. In “Flash and Substance,” which originally aired on Feb. 11,  2006, the Rogues team up and threaten to ruin Central City’s first “Flash Appreciation Day” by, well, killing the Scarlet Speedster. They don’t succeed, naturally.

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Empire strikes back in ‘Star Wars’ vs. Marvel and DC fan trailer

star-wars-v-dc-marvel

In recent months we’ve seen Batman vs. Darth Vader, and even DC vs. Marvel. But that was only for starters, as Alex Luthor — who brought us the latter — has now unveiled a fan trailer for … Star Wars vs. DC and Marvel.

Using footage from assorted movies, video games and even that aforementioned Batman vs. Darth Vader installment of “Super Power Beat Down,” the trailer is perhaps not as polished as Luthor’s DC vs. Marvel, but he does a good  job of building tension using the sound of Darth Vader’s respirator (even if the cut to the Millennium Falcon from The Force Awakens teaser is a little too jarring). And it’s tough not to smile when Chris Pratt’s Star-Lord makes his entrance …

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Fun from the Carter Administration in ‘Wonder Woman ’77’

wonder_woman_900x470

When the first few pages of Wonder Woman ’77‘s inaugural installment finds the Amazon Princess squaring off against a trio of Soviet roller-derby assassins, clearly it’s setting a very specific tone. DC’s latest digital-first series borrows its core conceit from the successful Batman ’66, presenting new comics stories from the world of an old TV adaptation.

Indeed, so far it’s fairly faithful to the show’s then-present-day setting, with Diana Prince and Steve Trevor working for a fictional government intelligence agency (the IADC) and getting their exposition from IRA the computer. Accordingly, in terms of period pieces, it’s not exactly The Americans, but writer Marc Andreyko and artist Drew Johnson have done a great job capturing both the look of the show and the style of its leads. Their Lynda Carter is spot-on, and their Lyle Waggoner evokes TV-Steve’s sparkly toothed swagger perfectly. Johnson (with colorist Romulo Fajardo Jr.) draws an especially detailed 1977, from the subtleties of Wonder Woman’s costume to the crowds at Studio 52. (Of course it’s “Studio 52.”)

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Image, BOOM! again named Gem Awards publishers of the year

diamond gem awardsIt’s deja vu all over again for the Diamond Gem Awards: Voted on by comics retailers, the winners this year look a lot like the 2013 lineup, with Image Comics and BOOM! Studios once again taking honors as top publishers in their divisions. Marvel was named top dollar publisher, DC Comics as top backlist publisher and Viz Media as top manga publisher — just like in 2012 and 2013.

The first issue of the widely acclaimed Ms. Marvel was honored as comic book of the year in the under $3 division, and Thor #1 was the choice among pricier comics. The Amazing Spider-Man #1 brought in the most dollars, however. My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic was named the best all-ages comic of the year, Batman: Earth One took the honors as best original graphic novel, and Box Brown’s Andre the Giant was the best indie comic.

In terms of who got what, DC Comics won seven awards, Marvel won six and Dark Horse won three, including best anthology for Dark Horse Presents, another three-peat.

Here’s the full list of winners:

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Comics A.M. | Police face ‘Charlie Hebdo’ suspects in twin siege

 

Crime | Police have surrounded an industrial park in the town of Dammartin-en-Goele, France, 25 miles north of Paris, where the two suspects in Wednesday’s massacre at the offices of satire magazine Charlie Hebdo are believed to be hiding. Police say brothers Cherif and Said Kouachi have taken over a print shop and are holding a hostage, and have reportedly told negotiators they wish to die as martyrs. The Associated Press reports that a second, apparently linked siege at a kosher supermarket in eastern Paris is believed to involve Amedy Coulibaly, suspected of killing a police officer on Thursday. Police say he’s holding at least six hostages. [The Guardian]

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Grumpy Old Fan | 10 from 2014, 10 for 2015

Ring in 2015?

Ring in 2015?

As the new year is still fairly new, it’s time once again to revisit some old speculation, and offer a fresh batch.

2015 promises to be an unusual year for DC Comics, thanks to a couple of well-publicized real-world events: moving its offices from New York to California, and publishing two months’ worth of retro-themed comics while the regular series take a break. Although I’m getting tired of writing about these things, they will continue to dominate DC news for the next little while. Accordingly, counterintuitive though it may be, this week I’m going to resist talking about them as much as possible. You know they’re coming, I know they’re coming; but let’s try to find some other topics in the meantime.

Now to catch up on 2014’s items:

1. Anniversaries. Besides Batman’s 75th, which naturally got lots of play, I noted that last year was the 50th anniversary of the Teen Titans, the 55th of the Silver Age Green Lantern, Nightwing’s 30th, Zero Hour’s 20th and Identity Crisis’ 10th. The Titans got a commemorative hardcover and IC likewise received a new edition. However, Nightwing-the-series ended in 2014, as Nightwing-the-identity was exposed and Dick Grayson got a new spy-oriented comic. I also wondered whether the 50th anniversary of Batman’s “New Look” would get some special attention (it didn’t, unless you count the flood of Batman ‘66 love that accompanied the long-awaited home video releases of the New Look-inspired series).
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DC Collectibles spotlights new Wonder Woman statue

wonder-woman-statue

DC Collectibles has released a video showcasing its upcoming DC Comics Cover Girl: Wonder Woman statue.

Solicited last month for release in July, the statue is designed by artist Stanley “Artgerm” Lau, and sculpted by Jack Mathews, the approximately 10-inch statue is a limited edition (5,200) priced at $99.95.

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Comics A.M. | Defiant ‘Charlie Hebdo’ plans to publish next week

"Je Suis Charlie"

“Je Suis Charlie”

Publishing | The French satire magazine Charlie Hebdo will be published next week, to demonstrate that “stupidity will not win,” according to columnist Patrick Pelloux. Ten of the magazine’s staff members were among those killed Wednesday when three armed men attacked their Paris headquarters, apparently because Charlie Hebdo published cartoons mocking the Prophet Muhammad. [The Guardian]

Political cartoons | Adam Taylor looks at the history of controversies regarding depictions of the Prophet Muhammad. [The Washington Post]

Political cartoons | Cartoonist and syndicator Daryl Cagle pens a remembrance four of the slain Charlie Hebdo cartoonists, some of whom he knew personally, and also talks about the importance of editorial cartooning in France. [Darylcagle.com]

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Comics A.M. | First Second’s Mark Siegel on ‘new mainstream’

This One Summer

This One Summer

Publishing | In a three-part interview, First Second Books Editorial Director Mark Siegel talks about 2014, the upcoming year, and the emergence of a “new mainstream.” In Part 1 he discusses the 2014 releases and ends with some numbers (print runs rather than sales); the imprint’s top books are Ben Hatke’s Zita the Spacegirl and Jillian and Mariko Tamaki’s This One Summer, both of which have 30,000 copies in print. In Part 2 he looks at the importance of the library market and support from librarians, especially for children and teens, as well as the emergence of a new category of graphic novels that he calls “new mainstream.” Part 3 focuses on First Second’s planned releases for 2015, including Scott McCloud’s The Sculptor, which will have a print run of 100,000. [ICv2]

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‘Dark Knight’ Tumbler puts other remote-control cars to shame

mini-tumbler2

It’s understandable if your enthusiasm for Dark Knight trilogy merchandise has waned in the more than two years since the release of the final film, but that will undoubtedly change with this: Soap Studio’s remote-control Tumbler.

Unveiled last month at Toy Soul 2014, this isn’t just any remote-control car. Oh, no. The 1/12th-scale Tumbler is controlled through an iOS or Android app, which will also allow you to open and close the cockpit doors, kick in the turbo boost, adjust the spoiler, LED lights and sound effects, and record with a camera in standard and night-vision modes.

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