digital comics Archives - Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

Comics A.M. | Australian expo draws criticism for pulling comic

Jesus Reloadeth'd

Jesus Reloadeth’d

Conventions | The organizers of the Supanova pop culture festival in Melbourne, Australia, triggered a social-media firestorm after removing a comic by artist Scarlette Baccini from her table because of explicit sexual content. The festival has a strict ban on pornography, and other adult material must be kept sealed and away from children. One of the organizers stopped by Baccini’s table, flipped through her Jesus Reloadeth’d, and saw a drawing of two men having sex, so he removed the comic. Baccini posted about the incident on Facebook, triggering accusations of homophobia against the event organizers. However, they responded that the issue was the explicitness of the image, not that it depicted two men. [SameSame]

Continue Reading »


Eyeing the Eisners: a look at the 2014 nominees

The Oatmeal

The Oatmeal by Matthew Inman

One of my favorite times of the year is here: the announcement of the nominees for the Will Eisner Comic Industry Awards. I love poring over each category to look for surprises, seeing books I never heard of or never got a chance to read. I guess when you get right down to it, I love getting to celebrate awesome comics.

It seems that with each year, the Eisners get better at reflecting the comics art form and industry at that moment. The judges not only hit the fan favorites and critical darlings, but also unexpected choices and hidden gems that truly benefit from this kind of recognition. It’s where quality instead of sales rule, as it should be for an award recognizing the very best of the industry.

Continue Reading »

Comics A.M. | Rare copy of ‘The Beano’ #1 goes up for auction

The Beano #1

The Beano #1

Auctions | A rare copy of The Beano #1 from July 1938 — only about 25 copies are believed to exist — is being auctioned on eBay by Seaford, England, dealer Phil Shrimpton. With just four days remaining, the opening bid of £3,499 (about $5,875 U.S.) has yet to be met. As you can see on the website, the copy certainly isn’t in the best shape. The issue, which sold a reported 442,963 copies when it was released, introduced such characters as original cover star Big Eggo the ostrich, Lord Snooty, Wee Peem and Ping the Elastic Man (the racist caricature in the magazine’s logo is Little Peanut, who stuck around on the cover until 1947, when he was replaced by Big Eggo). “Every year or so another one seems to emerge – often found in someone’s attic,” Shrimpton says. “People didn’t really look at comics as collector’s items until the sixties and seventies, so lots of them got destroyed. Also a lot of the comics were destroyed during the war as people were more conscious about recycling the old issues.” [The Argus]

Continue Reading »

Quote of the Day | Comics industry’s ‘frozen adolescence’

“No idea has proven more damaging to the comics industry than the myth that its professionals — not just creators, but retailers, even distributors — work for love and not money. It’s a philosophy that has justified exploitation of creators and theft of intellectual property. It’s allowed the entire industry to pass the buck for its failures — from publishers to retailers, and retailers to — for decades. And it’s why the comics industry lingers in a frozen adolescence, clinging to a shrinking target audience like a sea captain railing at the storm — when the real problem is the rotting wood of his own hull.”

Rachel Edidin, former Dark Horse editor turned freelance writer and editor, addressing reactions to Amazon’s announced purchase of comiXology for Wired.com


Comics A.M. | What Amazon-comiXology deal means (and what it doesn’t)

Amazon buys comiXology

Amazon buys comiXology

Digital comics | In today’s Amazon-acquires-comiXology article, Rachel Edidin deflates much of the hype, and the panic, surrounding the deal, pointing out that comics distribution is already a monopoly, large corporations already run the comics market, and comics have been available on Kindle all along: “Is the concern [...] a distribution monopoly? If so, the direct market is in no position to criticize: over the last 15 years, Diamond Comics Distributors has consumed almost all independent print distribution in comics, and dictates practices and policy to retailers and publishers alike. The idea that print comics are somehow more independent than their digital cousins — or a scrappy underdog fighting the good fight against evil corporate profiteers — is frankly ridiculous.” [Wired]

Awards | Michael Cavna talks with Kevin Siers of the Charlotte Observer about winning the Pulitzer Prize in cartooning. [Comic Riffs]

Continue Reading »

Comics A.M. | Examining implications of Amazon-comiXology deal

Amazon and comiXology

Amazon and comiXology

Digital comics | Jeff Gomez examines the implications of Amazon’s planned acquisition of comiXology, opining that it will give comics a wider reach but also force publishers of superhero fare to broaden their appeal beyond the core demographic: “The books will now be exposed to millions of newcomers, so it will behoove major publishers to make their stories more female-friendly, streamlined, and accessible. With comiXology’s new aim to make ‘every person on the planet a comics fan,’ publishers will need to consider new genres, greater variety, and more varied age groups.” [Business Insider]

Digital comics | ComiXology will continue to offer its Digital Storefronts for retailers, and it will not allow Amazon to target users of its Pull List service with its own offers, according to spokesman Chip Mosher. Also, no changes are planned to comiXology’s other retailer tools. [ICv2]

Continue Reading »

Can drones deliver my comics? Six thoughts on the Amazon/comiXology deal

amazon-ology-2-700e4In case you missed it, Amazon announced last Thursday their intent to buy the popular digital comics provider comiXology. The deal is expected to close in the second quarter of this year, and terms were not disclosed.

Maybe this explains why my Prime membership went up in price? OK, probably not. But this is a major shift for the industry, as the biggest seller of digital comics will be owned by a mega Internet company. It’s really too soon to know exactly what this will all mean, but here are a few thoughts I’ve had after shifting through the announcement and some of the reactions to it.

Continue Reading »


Set your own price for ‘Task Force Rad Squad’ #2

tfrd-preview

Last year Caleb Goellner, Buster Moody and Ryan Hill combined their love for things like Power Rangers and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles into a comic about friendship, alien monsters and giant robots. But the second issue of Task Force Rad Squad has something the first issue didn’t — kitties. Giant mutant killer kitties.

Goellner and Moody — who are flying without Hill this issue because he’s busy with IDW’s Judge Dredd: Mega City 2 miniseries — are once again offering the digital comic using a “pay what you want” model. You can download it from Gumroad right now, along with the first issue if you missed it. Goellner told me they’ll have print copies of the issue available at C2E2 in a couple of weeks. (His Mermaid: Evolution comic is also available as a “pay what you want” digital comic as well).

Continue Reading »

Comics A.M. | Political cartoon removed from Revolution News Facebook page

from the Revolution News cartoon

from the Revolution News cartoon

Political Cartoons | Facebook has removed an article from the Revolution News Facebook page, issued a warning to the owners of the page, and banned one admin for 12 hours, apparently because the article included a cartoon by Carlos Latuff that “violated community standards.” The cartoon shows Death pulling a skeleton from the grave; the skeleton has a swastika on its skull and is wrapped in a Greek flag, a reference to recent neo-Nazi activities in Greece. [CBLDF]

Comics | The Edmonton, Alberta police department has created a digital graphic novel about Alex Decoteau, the first Aboriginal officer in the department. Decoteau was also an Olympic runner and was killed during World War I at the age of 29. [CBC]

Continue Reading »

Comics A.M. | Cartoonist Jeff Pert passes away at age 55

jeff pert

Jeff Pert

Passings | Maine cartoonist Jeff Pert, best known for his cartoons and illustrations of lobsters and moose, died Friday on his way to the hospital with chest pains. He was 55. His cartoons adorned souvenir postcards and coffee cups, but he was also an active part of the local comics community in Brunswick, Maine, a regular at Casablanca Comics, and a participant in the Maine Comic Arts Festival. Pert created his first comic when he was in fifth grade and sold copies to local comic shops. “They probably gave us the money and then threw them in the garbage, but we were happy,” said his collaborator (and best friend) Jon Dumont. Pert was known for supporting other artists and even persuaded his local state representative, Maggie Daughtry, to start drawing her own comics: Daughtry knocked on Pert’s door when she was campaigning for office, and, she said, “Within an hour of meeting him, he literally changed my life.” When Daughtry told Pert that she had dreamed of being a cartoonist as a child, he encouraged her to start drawing again, which she did. [Portland Press Herald]

Continue Reading »

DC adds single issues to Google Play store

Google Play screenshot DCWhen the announcement was made this week that DC Comics has started selling single issues in the Google Play Books store, my reaction was surprise — that the publisher wasn’t doing it already. Unlike Marvel, which has an exclusive agreement with comiXology for single-issue sales, DC takes a broader approach, offering comics through Kindle, Nook, iBooks and, of course, comiXology. There’s a lot of redundancy there: You can read DC comics on your Kindle as straight e-books or via the comiXology Kindle Fire app, on your iPad via iBooks or the comiXology iOS app or the Kindle or Nook iOS apps, and now, on your Android device via Google Play Books or the comiXology Android app.

Why choose one over the other? Actually, the question really is, why something other than comiXology? For regular comics readers, comiXology offers a more organized storefront and bookshelf area; e-book vendors just give you lists, while comiXology groups comics by publisher, by series and by creator. The other bonus for comiXology users is their Guided View panel-by-panel view system, which flows really well and makes it easier to read comics on an iPhone. On the other hand, Amazon is where the casual customers are, people who just read books but might pick up a comic from time to time.

Continue Reading »

Comics A.M. | Cartoonist Signe Wilkinson named in defamation suit

From the Wilkinson cartoon in question

From the Wilkinson cartoon in question

Legal | Signe Wilkinson, Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist for The Philadelphia Inquirer and Philadelphia Daily News, has been named in a defamation lawsuit filed against the newspapers by Pennsylvania Supreme Court Justice Seamus McCaffery and his wife Lise Rapaport. The judge and his wife accuse the two papers of running a smear campaign against them, and the suit specifically mentions a Wilkinson cartoon satirizing their marital and work relationship (it’s complicated). Blogger Alan Gardner adds that he hasn’t been able to find a case in which a cartoonist was successfully sued for defamation, although in this case the newspapers’ reporting is part of the issue as well. [Philadelphia, The Daily Cartoonist]

Continue Reading »

Steve Ellis delves into origins of AMC’s ‘Turn’ in digital comic

turn-cover

In the build-up to Sunday’s premiere of Turn, the Revolutionary War thriller based on Alexander Rose’s fascinating 2007 book Washington’s Spies, AMC has released a beautifully illustrated online comic that details the backstories of the members of the Culper spy ring.

Turn: Origins is drawn by Steve Ellis, known for his work on High Moon, Box 13 and The Only Living Boy, and penned by Turn writer LaToya Morgan, whose credits include Shameless and Parenthood. Kevin Colden did the lettering.

Continue Reading »

Grant Morrison and Rian Hughes unlock ‘The Key’ for the BBC

key1

Grant Morrison and Rian Hughes have reteamed for The Key, a wordless online comic created for the BBC’s Freedom2014, a new initiative examining what freedom looks like today.

Set in a dystopian future where drones fill the skies, The Key opens with the apparent government execution of a man in a straightjacket with a bag over his head (BBC News notes the similarity between the pointed corners of the bag and Batman’s mask).

Continue Reading »

Comics A.M. | Protesters rally against cuts to SC colleges

fun home2Graphic novels | An estimated 200 students, faculty and community members gathered Saturday at the College of Charleston in South Carolina to protest proposed budget cuts to that school and the University of South Carolina Upstate in retaliation for selecting gay-themed books — including Alison Bechdel’s Fun Home — for their summer reading programs. The South Carolina House of Representatives approved a proposal early this month that would slash $52,000 cut from the College of Charleston and $17,142 for USC Upstate, which represent what each school spent on the programs. The budget is now before the state Senate. [The Post and Courier]

Continue Reading »


Browse the Robot 6 Archives