DRM-free Archives - Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

Comics A.M. | A look at the diversity of the Batman family

Batwoman #32

Batwoman #32

Comics | Writing for The Advocate, Jase Peeples takes note of the diversity of DC Comics’ extended Batman family — from Batwoman to Batwing to Barbara Gordon’s roommate Alysia Yeoh — and talks with writers Gail Simone, Grant Morrison, Marc Andreyko, Tom Taylor and Chip Kidd. “I would like to think that people can pick up books like Batman Incorporated or The Multiversity and see their own lives reflected,” Morrison says. “But I’d always caveat that with the need for us to see more diverse writers and artists, because that’s when I think the walls will really come down. As a straight [white guy from Scotland] I can only do so much, and I find even sometimes when you do this, you do get accused of tokenism or pandering. I don’t mind it. I can put up with that, but I’d rather see a genuine spread of writers and artists creating this material.” [Advocate.com]

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comiXology releases the digital comics shackles

comixology-600

[Editor’s note: Each Sunday, Robot 6 contributors discuss the best in comics from the last seven days — from news and announcements to a great comic that came out to something cool creators or fans have done.]

After last year’s comiXology server blackout, I asked the digital comics provider to drop the leasing arrangement it was using. I was not the first or the last to protest the use of DRM, or digital rights management, technology to prevent people from owning a file of the comic they just purchased. It has consistently been a point of contention for a segment of potential customers, and now our wish is granted. comiXology shook up Comic-Con by announcing they are now offering true downloads of DRM-free back-up files for purchased digital comics.

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Image integrates its DRM-free comics with Dropbox

image-dropboxImage Comics has partnered with Dropbox to allow customers to download DRM-free titles purchased on the publisher’s website to the cloud-storage service. That means readers with Dropbox accounts will be able to easily view their Image libraries across computers and mobile devices.

“Now, when viewing your comics collection on the Image Website, you’ll see a ‘Save to Dropbox’ button,” Image explained. “Click that, log in to your Dropbox account, and your comics are automatically saved to the folder of your choice.  Once your comics have been saved, you can view them the integrated Dropbox Reader or open in your choice of digital comic reader apps on your iPad, Nexus, Kindle Fire, smartphone, laptop, or any of your digital comics reading devices.”

Image began offering DRM-free downloads in July, selling high-quality PDFs, CBRs, CBZs and ePub formats of new comics through its online storefront, with no restrictions on sharing or copying. It’s the first major U.S. comics publisher to do so.

Dropbox accounts begin with 2GB of storage, but can be expanded to as much as 16GB by referring friends. Pro plans start at $9.99 a month for 100 GB of storage.

Quote of the Day | ‘It’s the new economy. You must adapt.’

insufferable1“I’m a big believer that if you buy a comic, you ought to own it. With Insufferable you pay what you will. The market will determine what it’s worth. My instincts are bearing it out. For every person who wants to take it for free, there are those who are willing to show support.

Going DRM-free moves the needle for us. I appreciate the fact that people are nervous about file sharing and piracy. I don’t share that feeling, but I appreciate that some people do. Share my stuff. I think of it this way: When you hear that people have downloaded your comic, appreciate that thousands are eager to hear what you have to say. The poetry club down the hall may not have the same problem. That’s a good problem to have. It’s the new economy. You must adapt.”

Mark Waid, on whether larger publishers will follow Thrillbent and Image Comics in adopting the DRM-free distribution model


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