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Comics A.M. | French teen arrested for posting ‘Charlie Hebdo’ parody

From the apparent cartoon in question

From the apparent cartoon in question

Legal | A 16-year-old in Nantes, France, was arrested last week for posting a cartoon on Facebook that mocks the Charlie Hebdo killings; the charge is “advocating terrorism.” The cartoon shows someone holding a copy of Charlie Hebdo and being struck by bullets. Electronic Intifada posts what is most likely the offending cartoon (it had been shared widely on social media), a takeoff on one of the more notorious Charlie Hebdo covers, accompanied by the text, “Charlie Hebdo is shit. It doesn’t stop bullets.” The original cover featured a cartoon of an Egyptian protestor holding the Koran, with text that read, “The Quran is shit, it doesn’t stop bullets.” [France 3]

Publishing | Sales were down in 2014 for Diamond Book Distributors, even though the industry overall had an up year. The reason: DBD lost a key client, Dark Horse, to Random House. Nonetheless, Vice President Kuo-Yu Liang sees good things in store for 2015, including strong sales of indie graphic novels, expanding international sales, and the much-anticipated March: Book Two, which was released this week. [Publishers Weekly]

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Comics A.M. | Pakistan, Turkey and Taliban condemn ‘Charlie Hebdo’ cover

 

Editorial cartoons | The leaders of Pakistan, Turkey and the Taliban on Thursday condemned the new Charlie Hebdo cover depicting the Prophet Muhammad. “If someone is printing a cartoon insulting the prophet, there is a provocation,” Turkish Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu told reporters. The lower house of the Pakistan parliament unanimously approved a resolution condemning the cartoons, and the Tailban emailed a statement saying, “We strongly condemn this repugnant and inhumane action,” which is “opening the door to provoking the sensitivities of nearly one and a half billion Muslims.” Also, several people were injured when police broke up an anti-Charlie Hebdo protest outside the French Consulate in Karachi. [Bloomberg]

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Comics A.M. | ‘Charlie Hebdo’ massacre survivor recounts attack

Sigolène Vinson

Sigolène Vinson

Crime | Sigolène Vinson, a writer for Charlie Hebdo, gives her account of the Jan. 7 shootings that killed 12 at the French satire magazine’s headquarters. Vinson was in the kitchen and heard brothers Chérif and Saïd Kouachi shoot her coworkers; she hid in a colleague’s office but came face to face with Saïd Kouachi, who told her “Don’t be afraid, calm down. I won’t kill you. You’re a woman, we don’t kill women. But think about what you do, what you do is bad. I’m sparing you and because I’ve spared you, you will read the Qur’an.” (However, Chérif killed writer Elsa Cayat, the only female victim of the attack.) [The Guardian]

Awards | This year’s grand prix de la ville d’Angoulême, the lifetime achievement award given every year at the Angoulême International Comics Festival, won’t be given to the staff of Charlie Hebdo, despite a petition started by jury president Gwen de Bonneval that garnered 1,200 signatures plus significant support on Twitter and Facebook. Two Charlie Hebdo cartoonists, Wolinski, who was killed in the Jan. 7 attack, and Willem, who wasn’t in the office that day, have been awarded the grand prix in previous years. The festival has announced a special Charlie Hebdo award that will go to a cartoonist whose work embodies resistance to oppression and censorship, and organizers will also publish a special album of cartoons drawn in response to the attacks. [France Inter]

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‘Charlie Hebdo’ | A roundup of news and reactions

Below are some links to news, commentary and reactions to the Charlie Hebdo shootings, but to start off, here’s a fascinating look at the staff at work, planning their first Prophet Muhammad cartoon issue. This five-minute video not only shows the slain cartoonists at work, it provides valuable context for everything that follows. [The New York Times]

Demonstrations | The crowd at Sunday’s rally in honor of the slain Charlie Hebdo cartoonists was estimated at 1.6 million, and leaders of more than 40 nations were there as well. [The New York Times]

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‘Charlie Hebdo’ suspects killed in standoff with special forces [UPDATED]

Chérif and Saïd Kouachi

Chérif and Saïd Kouachi

Members of the Groupe d’Intervention de la Gendarmerie Nationale (GIGN), a special forces unit of the French army, stormed two locations simultaneously today, killing Chérif and Saïd Kouachi, the two brothers believed to be responsible for the attack on the offices of Charlie Hebdo, as well as a man who had taken a number of hostages in a supermarket and demanded that the Kouachi brothers be freed.

The twin actions brought an end to two days of tension in Paris and throughout France that began Wednesday when the Kouachis forced their way into the Paris office of the satire magazine Charlie Hebdo and killed 12  people, including five cartoonists. The attack was apparently in retaliation for cartoons the magazine had published that mocked the Prophet Muhammad. The two gunmen fled in a series of hijacked cars, and this morning they engaged into a shootout with police on the N2 motorway at Dammartin-en-Goële, near the Charles de Gaulle airport. The brothers fled to a nearby print shop, where they took one person hostage.

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Comics A.M. | Police face ‘Charlie Hebdo’ suspects in twin siege

 

Crime | Police have surrounded an industrial park in the town of Dammartin-en-Goele, France, 25 miles north of Paris, where the two suspects in Wednesday’s massacre at the offices of satire magazine Charlie Hebdo are believed to be hiding. Police say brothers Cherif and Said Kouachi have taken over a print shop and are holding a hostage, and have reportedly told negotiators they wish to die as martyrs. The Associated Press reports that a second, apparently linked siege at a kosher supermarket in eastern Paris is believed to involve Amedy Coulibaly, suspected of killing a police officer on Thursday. Police say he’s holding at least six hostages. [The Guardian]

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Comics A.M. | Defiant ‘Charlie Hebdo’ plans to publish next week

"Je Suis Charlie"

“Je Suis Charlie”

Publishing | The French satire magazine Charlie Hebdo will be published next week, to demonstrate that “stupidity will not win,” according to columnist Patrick Pelloux. Ten of the magazine’s staff members were among those killed Wednesday when three armed men attacked their Paris headquarters, apparently because Charlie Hebdo published cartoons mocking the Prophet Muhammad. [The Guardian]

Political cartoons | Adam Taylor looks at the history of controversies regarding depictions of the Prophet Muhammad. [The Washington Post]

Political cartoons | Cartoonist and syndicator Daryl Cagle pens a remembrance four of the slain Charlie Hebdo cartoonists, some of whom he knew personally, and also talks about the importance of editorial cartooning in France. [Darylcagle.com]

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Cartoonist Philippe Honoré among ‘Charlie Hebdo’ victims

Al-BaghdadiA fifth cartoonist has been named among the victims of the shootings Wednesday at the Paris offices of satire magazine Charlie Hebdo: Philippe Honoré, whose cartoon of ISIS leader Abu Bakr Al-Baghdadi was in the magazine’s last tweet before the attack. Honoré was critically injured in the shootings and died in the emergency room.

Cartoonists Stéphane Charbonnier (aka Charb), Jean Cabut (Cabu), George Wolinski and Bernard Velhac (Tignous) were also killed in the attacks, which left 10 magazine staff members and two police officers dead.

Born in 1941 in Vichy, Honoré was a self-taught artist whose first cartoon was published in the daily newspaper Sud-Ouest when he was just 16 years old. He started working at Charlie Hebdo in 1992 and published two or three cartoons a week there. His work also appeared in Le Monde, Libération, Les Inrockuptibles and Charlie Hebdo‘s predecessor, Hara-Kiri.

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Remembering the cartoonists of ‘Charlie Hebdo’

Love Stronger Than Hate“C’est peut-être un peu pompeux ce que je vais dire, mais je préfère mourir debout que vivre à genoux.”

“It may be a bit pompous for me to say this, but I prefer dying on my feet to living on my knees.”

Stephane Charbonnier, aka Charb, the editor of Charlie Hebdo, who was among those killed in today’s attacks.

The assassination — for that’s what it is — of four cartoonists, six other Charlie Hebdo staff members and two policemen unleashed a torrent of grief and solidarity around the world today as news spread of the attack by masked gunmen on the Paris offices of the satirical weekly.

That the gunmen reportedly shouted “Allahu Akbar” (“God is great”) and “The Prophet has been avenged” points to the likelihood that the shootings were in retaliation for the several issues of the magazine that carried cartoons depicting the Prophet Muhammad. (It should be noted from the start that Charlie Hebdo is an equal-opportunity offender; recent cartoons have also lampooned North Korean leader Kim Jong-un and the birth of Christ.) Time has a short history of the magazine’s provocations, and Mic.com has posted a selection of the Muhammad cartoons.

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Gunmen kill 12 at office of French satirical magazine [Updated]

This cartoon was the last tweet sent out by Charlie Hebdo before the shootings

This cartoon was the last tweet sent out by Charlie Hebdo before the shootings

Masked gunmen attacked the Paris headquarters of the satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo this morning, killing at least 12 people — 10 employees and two police officers — and wounding eight others. The three attackers remain at large after fleeing the scene and hijacking a car.

Paris has been placed on highest alert following what Francoise Hollande described as “a terrorist attack.”

According to French media, Charlie Hebdo editor Stephane Charbonnier (aka “Charb”) and three other of its best-known cartoonists — Cabu, Wolinski and Tignous — are among the dead.

While the specific motive for the shooting is unclear, Charlie Hebdo has a history of satirizing Islam, and Charbonnier was included on a “most wanted” list published in the Al-Qaeda magazine Inspire. The last tweet sent out on the Charlie Hebdo account before the shooting was an image of ISIS leader Abu Bakr Al-Baghdadi, and this week’s magazine included an article about Michel Houellebecq’s new novel Submission, which depicts a future France under Islamic rule. The Guardian notes that there had been an uptick in threats against the magazine in recent weeks, and security at the Charlie Hebdo offices had been increased.

The magazine’s offices were firebombed in 2011 when it published an issue “guest-edited” by the Prophet Muhammad. The following week, the magazine responded with a cover image of Muhammad kissing a male Hebdo journalist. In 2012 Charlie Hebdo published cartoons of a naked Muhammad, and in 2013 released a serious cartoon biography of the prophet. News reports at the time noted that Charbonnier had received death threats and was living under police protection.

Comics A.M. | Rare Tintin drawing sells for $670,000

1939 Tintin drawing by Herge

1939 Tintin drawing by Herge

Auctions | An original 1939 drawing of Tintin created by Herge for the cover of the weekly magazine Le Petit Vingtième sold Sunday for $673,468 at an auction of French and Belgian comics art held simultaneously in Paris and Brussels. The auction featured 101 works, of which 86 were purchased for a total of $2.4 million. [Agence France-Presse]

Auctions | A copy of The Hulk #181, featuring the first appearance of Wolverine, fetched $8,000 at an auction held Saturday at Back to the Past comics store in Redford, Michigan. [My Fox Detroit]

Retailing | System of a Down drummer John Dolmayan, who shuttered his online store Torpedo Comics in 2010 after about three years in business, is looking to open a brick-and-mortar shop. A brief story notes that while Las Vegas store Comic Oasis, owner Derrick Taylor is partnering with Dolmayan to open Torpedo Comics in January at 8775 Lindell Road, Building H, Suite 150. [Vegas Inc.]

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Jiro Taniguchi to be guest at Angoulême comics festival

Jiro Taniguchi

Jiro Taniguchi

Jiro Taniguchi, creator of The Walking Man, A Distant Neighborhood and more than 40 other manga, will be a special guest in January at the 42nd Angoulême International Comics Festival, which will include a major exhibit of his work — the first of its scale in Europe.

Titled “Taniguchi, l’homme qui rêve” (“Taniguchi, the dreaming man”), the exhibition will cover four decades of Taniguchi’s work, which includes the memoir A Zoo in Winter, the conquest-of-Everest tale Summit of the Gods, the time-travel story A Distant Neighborhood, and the mystery The Quest for the Missing Girl.

Not only does Taniguchi’s work span most of the major graphic novel genres, the official press release points out, but he has crossed over to become an author with universal appeal. Indeed, Laurent Duvault, director of international media development for the publishing group Media Participations, told me at this year’s festival that “Taniguchi was the first Japanese artist to have his own area, not in the manga section but in the French section [of bookstores]. It was a graphic novel approach, not a manga approach.” He attributed this in part to the fact that Taniguchi’s work is flipped, so it reads left to right, making it more accessible to readers of European languages. Taniguchi is no stranger to Angoulême: A Distant Neighborhood was awarded the Alph’Art prize for best scenario at the 2003 festival, and he was one of the nominees for the Grand Prix this year.

Taniguchi, who has four new books coming out this year in France, will be present at Angoulême to open the exhibit and participate in the program; after the festival is over, the show will go on tour around France and the rest of Europe.

Angoulême: First impressions from a first-time visitor

Intersection with banners web version

Last week, when I was packing my bags to go to the Angoulême International Comics Festival, I kept having to explain to people — even comics people — what it was.

Now that I’m back, it’s not a problem any more.

This year’s selection of Bill Watterson as the winner of the Grand Prix d’Angoulême, and the president of next year’s festival, has put Angoulême on the map for more U.S. readers — or at least, it has sent the cartoonist’s fans scurrying to the map to see where it is.

What follows is a series of first impressions from my first trip to Angoulême; check out Publishers Weekly (which provided me with a press badge) for more solid coverage, and of course no one can capture an event like Heidi MacDonald.

There are a lot of reasons to go to Angoulême — the international array of creators and publishers who are there, the opportunity to get the hottest new BDs and of course, French food, scenery and wine all spring to mind — but to me, the most impressive thing about it was that I was in a place where comics really mattered. Comics aren’t a niche product in France; they are available everywhere, they are widely read, and they are taken seriously. In my previous sojourns in France, long before I was a comics journalist, I was accustomed to seeing a rack of hardcover, full-color comics at the grocery store, train station, and bookstore.
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Grand Prix shortlist announced for Angouleme

Angoleme 2014The Angoulême International Comics Festival is just around the corner, and the shortlist for the Grand Prix de la Ville d’Angoulême was announced on Tuesday:

Binet, Christophe Blain, Charles Burns, Pierre Christin, Daniel Clowes, Richard Corben, Bernard Cosey, Étienne Davodeau, Nicolas de Crécy, Edika, Emmanuel Guibert, Hermann, Alejandro Jodorowsky, Manu Larcenet, Milo Manara, Lorenzo Mattotti, Alan Moore, Katsuhiro Otomo, Quino, Marjane Satrapi, Joann Sfar, Jiro Taniguchi, Jean Van Hamme, Chris Ware et Bill Watterson.

The prize is awarded to a living comics creator, and traditionally the winner serves as president of the jury for the following year’s festival; previous honorees have included Robert Crumb and Art Spiegelman, but the award usually goes to someone working in French-language comics.

There was a bit of controversy last year when juror Lewis Trondheim leaked the finalists on Twitter: Alan Moore, Katsohiro Otomo, Akira Toriyama, Chris Ware, and the eventual winner, Willem, who is well known in French-speaking countries but less so in the rest of the world (the poster above is his work). The Grand Prix winner is chosen by a combination of votes from French creators and a jury of past winners (l’Académie des Grands Prix), and the word on the street last year was that Toriyama was the creators’ choice but the jury overruled that and went with Willem. Toriyama was given a special prize commemorating the 40th anniversary of Dragon Ball.

If I’m reading the French article right, the process will be different this year, with the list being narrowed down to three names in a preliminary round of voting and the winner being determined by a second round in which the creators and the jurors will have an equal say.

Comics A.M. | WonderCon wants ‘to get back to the Bay Area’

WonderCon Anaheim

WonderCon Anaheim

Conventions | Although convention organizers rolled out an altered name — WonderCon Anaheim — and logo when they confirmed two weeks ago that the event will return to Anaheim, California, again next year, they insist they haven’t close the door on San Francisco. “We still want to get back to the Bay Area. […] We are in touch with [the Moscone Center organizers] fairly regularly and we have an open dialogue,” says David Glanzer, director of marketing and public relations. “They haven’t given up on us, either.” The convention was uprooted from the Moscone Center in 2012 first because of remodeling and now because of scheduling conflicts. WonderCon Anaheim will be held April 18-20. [Publishers Weekly]

Digital comics | I spoke with Archie Comics Co-CEO Jon Goldwater and iVerse Media CEO Michael Murphey about the new “all-you-can-eat” digital service, Archie Unlimited. [Good E-Reader]

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