Francesco Francavilla Archives - Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

Talking Comics with Tim | Mike Pellerito on Archie’s kids line

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Archie Comics is in an unusual position among North American comics companies, as not only is a majority of its titles geared toward younger readers, but a majority of that audience is female.

Curious to learn how Archie maintains that readership, I reached out to President Mike Pellerito to discuss how he envisions the market for the company’s core kids line, and how he seeks to expand what it offers. Of course, the recent hiring of Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa as chief creative officer and his potential impact on the line became central to the discussion.

In the comments section, please be sure to answer Pellerito’s question to Robot 6 readers.

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Best of 7 | Stan Sakai auctions, ‘Master Keaton’ and more

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Welcome to Best of 7, where we talk about “The best in comics from the last seven days” — which could be anything from an exciting piece of news to a cool publisher’s announcement to an awesome comic that came out.

This week we focus in on some great new comics, including Veil and Afterlife with Archie, as well as the benefit auctions for Stan Sakai and his wife. Plus free comics! What’s better than that? So without further ado, let’s get to it …

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Stare into the Abyss with Hart, Cohle and Francavilla

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Breaking Bad may be over, but Francesco Francavilla has found a new television passion — True Detective. Like he did with Breaking Bad, the Afterlife with Archie artist is drawing posters based on the HBO series. You can find a limited edition one featuring the two main characters for sale at his Big Cartel site, and start speculating now what TV show he’ll focus on after the March 9 finale of True Detective.

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Francesco Francavilla gets into the Winter Olympics spirit

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ROBOT 6 favorite Francesco Francavilla is well known for his series of themed art posts, ranging from Breaking Bad episode posters to Justified character images to his “Batploitation” renditions of the Batman cast. In keeping with current events, the Eisner Award-winning artist has turned his attention to the Sochi Olympics, posting daily illustrations that insert Marvel and DC characters into the winter games.

And so we’re treated to a bobsledding Fantastic Four (well, three), a snowboarding Silver Surfer and, above, a cross-country skiing Black Racer. See more on Francavilla’s blog.

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This week DC’s magic number isn’t 52, it’s 27

TEC #27 coverWhile DC Comics sacrificed some bragging rights in 2011 when it rebooted its superhero line, even the never-before-renumbered Action Comics and Detective Comics, one consequence of relaunching TEC was that it was only a matter of time — 26 months, to be exact — before the company got around to publishing a new Detective Comics #27. And that the second Detective Comics #27 would see release during the 75th year of Batman’s career, well, all the better.

The first Detective Comics #27, published in 1939, was, of course, the first appearance of Batman. The anthology’s cover was surrendered to an arresting image of a spooky man in tights, wearing a bat-mask and sporting huge bat-like wings, scooping up a gangster in a headlock while swinging in front of the yellow field above a city skyline. “Starting this issue,” the cover trumpted, “The Amazing and Unique Adventures of The Batman.”  Inside, Bob Kane and Bill Finger’s pulp- and film-inspired detective hero cracked the “The Case of the Chemical Syndicate,” and the amazing and unique adventures begun therein have yet to cease.

DC has honored that milestone in various ways over the years, with notable celebrations including Michael Uslan and Peter Snejbjerg’s 2003 Elseworlds one-shot Batman: Detective No. 27, and 1991′s Detective Comics #627, in which the Alan Grant/Norm Breyfogle and Marv Wolfman/Jim Aparo creative teams did their own takes on “The Case of the Chemical Syndicate,” and both the original story and a 30th-anniversary version by Mike Friedrich and Bob Brown were reprinted.

This week brings Detective Comics (Vol. 2) #27, and another opportunity to celebrate that original issue, and Batman’s 75th anniversary, which DC does in a 90-page, prestige-format special issue — essentially a trade paperback with some ads in it — featuring contributions from the writers of all four of the main Batman books of the moment and about as strong a list of contributing artists as a reader could hope for.

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Francavilla offers a peek at his ‘Detective Comics’ #27 story

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Eisner Award-winning artist Francesco Francavilla has teased the Wednesday release of Detective Comics #27 with a glimpse at his contribution to the giant-sized issue, a story titled simply “Rain.”

“I was invited to participate with a story and I came up with RAIN, a short little tale that will give us a look in the past of a character very close to me,” he explains on his blog.

Francavilla is joined in the 96-special issue, which kicks off DC Comics’ celebration of Batman’s 75th anniversary, by the creative teams of Bard Meltzer and Bryan Hitch, Scott Snyder and Sean Murphy, John Layman and Jason Fabok, Peter J. Tomasi and Guillem March, Paul Dini and Dustin Nguyen, and Gregg Hurwitz and Neal Adams. (ROBOT 6 spoke with Meltzer last week about his story, a modern-day retelling of Batman’s first appearance in 1939′s Detective Comics #27.)

See the first page of Francavilla’s story below, and a little more on his blog.

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Francavilla continues to get his groove on with ‘Batman 1972′

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Last year Black Beetle creator Francesco Francavilla blew minds with his rendition of “Batman ’72,” the first case of “BATPLOITATION,” as he put it. Now he’s back with a few more images, including a ’70s-era car for Gotham’s Finest and a groovy Two-Face.

“GROOVIEST COMICBOOK OF 2014? (let’s hope it happens),” he said on Tumblr. Yes, let’s hope!

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Creators weigh in on 2013 and 2014 (Part 7)

Our annual “Looking Forward, Looking Back” feature continues, as we ask various comics folks what they liked in 2013, what they’re looking forward to in 2014 and what projects they have planned for the coming year. In, this final round, we hear from Vito Delsante, Jacq Cohen, Mark Sable, Dean Haspiel, Joshua Williamson, Jordie Bellaire, Paul Allor, Adam P. Knave, Tim Gibson, Bryan Q. Miller, Nathan Edmondson, Ann Nocenti, Jason Latour, Paul Tobin, Ming Doyle, Jeff Parker, Francesco Francavilla and Gabriel Hardman.

And if you missed them, be sure to check out Part 1Part 2Part 3Part 4Part 5 and Part 6 where we heard from Jimmy Palmiotti, Tim Seeley, Chris Roberson, Kurt Busiek, Faith Erin Hicks, Tyler Kirkham, G. Willow Wilson and many more.

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Francesco Francavilla spreads some holiday … cheer?

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It’s Christmas Eve, but if you’re already fed up with all the holiday cheer, fa la la la la and all of that, may we suggest visiting the blog of The Black Beetle creator Francesco Francavilla, who provides the perfect antidote by re-posting his Shadow short story “Blood on Christmas” and his wintery film-poster homage The Cold, the Frozen and the Iced.

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Comics A.M. | ‘Kuroko’s Basketball’ returns to shelves

Kuroko's Basketball

Kuroko’s Basketball

Retailing | The rental chain Tsutaya and the bookstore chain Yurindo have returned Kuroko’s Basketball books and DVDs to their shelves after “X-Day,” Nov. 4, passed without incident. Someone has sent hundreds of threatening letters to convention sites, bookstores, the media and Sophia University (the alma mater of Kuroko’s Basketball creator Tadatoshi Fujimaki), over the past year, and the most recent batch of letters said that “X-Day will be on the final day of the [Sophia University] school festival.” Meanwhile, police are checking security cameras near all the mailboxes in the districts from which the letters were mailed, looking for suspicious people. [Anime News Network]

Comics | Brian Steinberg looks at Archie Comics’ most radical move yet: the relatively adult Afterlife with Archie, which literally turned America’s most iconic teenagers into zombies. Steinberg talks to Archie CEO Jon Goldwater, writer Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa, artist Francesco Francavilla and others about the significance of this comic, which sold almost 65,000 copies to the direct market. [Variety]

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Robot Reviews | ‘Afterlife with Archie’ #1

Afterlife with Archie #1

Afterlife with Archie #1

Afterlife with Archie started out for me with a couple of potential negatives: I’m not a fan of horror comics, and I firmly believe the zombie subgenre has played itself out. But if there’s one factor that could make me enjoy a zombie comic, it’s the art of Francesco Francavilla.

The ongoing series, written by Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa, marks a significant departure for Archie Comics, in large part because it’s the publisher’s first direct market-only release. One has to wonder how much this will benefit the publisher, whose audience is found primarily outside of specialty stores, and whether its potential success will lead to more direct market-only titles.

But enough about the business aspects of Life with Archie; let’s focus on what makes its debut issue such a must-read. As much as the Archie line has redefined itself in recent years (the marriage storyline/titles, the introduction of gay character Kevin Keller, etc.), the use of an artist like Francavilla represents another leap. I count him among my favorite current artists for much the same reason I rave about Gabriel Hardman; When reading a story by either creator, the experience is like having a film playing in my head.

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Quote of the Day | Riverdale, horror and Reggie’s dark secret

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“I’ve never read Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, although I certainly know what that is. And what I love about that concept is as much as it’s a zombie story, it’s also Pride and Prejudice. It’s the exact same thing with Afterlife: As much as this is a hardcore horror zombie book, it’s still an Archie book. Who is Archie going to take to the Halloween dance? Betty or Veronica? Why does the zombie apocalypse start? Because Sabrina the Teenaged Witch messed up a spell, which she is constantly doing in the comic book. Who but Reggie would be the guy who runs over Hot Dog? If anybody has a dark secret like ‘I killed Hot Dog!’ it’s going to be Reggie Mantle.”

– writer Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa, talking with Vulture about Afterlife With Archie, which debuts today. Deadline also has the exclusive New York Comic Con trailer for the series, which is illustrated by Francesco Francavilla

Comics A.M. | Jeff Smith on CBLDF; Archie’s ‘hardcore horror book’

Jeff Smith

Jeff Smith

Creators | Jeff Smith, who was named last week to the board of the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund, talks briefly about the importance of the organization, and the 2010 challenge to his all-ages graphic novel Bone in a Minnesota school. [Comic Riffs]

Comics | Archie Co-CEO Jon Goldwater, writer Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa and artist Francesco Francavilla have a few things to say about the new zombie series Afterlife With Archie. “We are taking a series of characters known to be lighthearted and young adult-oriented and doing a horror comic with them, so the mood, atmosphere, and setting are very important to make this a believable horror and not a comedy horror,” says Francavilla, who’s also the creator of The Black Beetle. “Fortunately, I am really good at making things dark and ominous.” [The Associated Press]

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Francavilla comes full circle with ‘Breaking Bad’ posters

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The glorious finale of Breaking Bad on Sunday also means an end to the beautiful posters Francesco Francavilla creates following the broadcast of each of the episodes (we’ve featured them a couple of times on ROBOT 6, most recently just last week). With his final entry, the artist includes a clever callback to his poster for the pilot, providing beautiful visual bookends.

While Francavilla may have completed his Breaking Bad series, he’s begun creating posters for each of the episodes of Fox’s new supernatural mystery Sleepy Hollow. OK, that show isn’t in the same league as Vince Gilligan’s grand creation, but Francavilla’s posters for it are something to see.

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Mondo show to pay tribute to EC Comics, ‘Tales From the Crypt’

Art by Bruce White

Art by Bruce White

Mondo, the Alamo Drafthouse’s collectible art boutique, is celebrating EC Comics and Tales From the Crypt for Halloween with a gallery show featuring work by more than 30 artists honoring the television anthology and the horror titles on which it was based.

“I care about EC Comics very much. Even though I wasn’t around when it was originally published, the HBO Tales From the Crypt was an amazing intro into a demented world of darkly comedic horror stories and vivid artwork,” Mondo CEO Justin Ishmael said in a press release. “EC Comics’ editor Bill Gaines is one of my heroes and it’s so incredibly exciting to combine his creations with 30-something artists that are also fans of that era.”

The show, which will run from Oct. 25 through Nov. 23 at the Mondo Gallery in Austin, Texas, will original art and screen prints by the likes of Warwick Johnson Cadwell, Francesco Francavilla, Jeff Lemire, Chris Mooneyham, Ed Piskor, Jim Rugg and Eric Skillman. You can see more names on the postcard below.

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