Genesis Archives - Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

Talking Comics with Tim | Alison Sampson on ‘Genesis’

Genesis

Typically a newcomer artist to comics doesn’t have a background of 25 years of experience in architecture, but United Kingdom-based Alison Sampson is not your typical creator. One realizes that after seeing her one-of-a-kind work on Genesis, her upcoming Image Comics graphic novella with writer Nathan Edmondson about a man who gains unlimited power, only for it to become his worst nightmare.

Naturally, I was curious to learn how an architect decided to explore working in comics; we discuss that among other topics in this interview.

Continue Reading »


Comics A.M. | DC, Marvel shut out of February bookstore chart

The Walking Dead, Vol. 19

The Walking Dead, Vol. 19

Graphic novels | Marvel and DC Comics may dominate the direct market but the bookstore channel is another story: As ICv2 points out, neither publisher landed a title on Nielsen BookScan’s list of the 20 top-selling graphic novels in February. Instead, here’s what it looked like: six volumes of The Walking Dead, six volumes of Attack on Titan, two volumes of Saga, and single volumes of some well-established titles Locke & Key, Bleach, Naruto, Adventure Time and Avatar: The Last Airbender, and the adaptation of the novel Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children. That makes Image Comics the winner of the month, followed by Kodansha Comics, and the list is heavy on books with tween and teen appeal. [ICv2]

Continue Reading »

Deathlok predicts the future in Wolverine & The X-Men Twitter class

The Jean Grey School for Higher Learning

In a novel use of Twitter, Marvel live-tweeted a class from the curriculum of the Jean Grey School for Higher Learning, straight from the pages of Wolverine & The X-Men. Taking part in the class were Headmistress Kitty Pryde, students Genesis, Kid Gladiator, Quentin Quire, Idie Okonkwo, Broo, Rockslide and Anole, and guest lecturer Deathlok.

Warning: Potential spoilers follow.

While much of the class consisted of banter from the students insulting each other and gossiping about campus events, there were a few pieces of information gleaned from the guest lecture in “Future History 101.” After the lecture officially began, Quentin Quire and Rockslide engaged in a debate as to what was different about Headmistress Pryde.

Continue Reading »

Grumpy Old Fan | Going on about ongoing series, Part Two

Starman #0

[Last week I started a look back at DC’s ongoing series in a post-Crisis environment of annual line-wide events. Thanks as always to Mike’s Amazing World Of DC Comics for its invaluable data.]

The second half of the 1980s was, to put it mildly, a transitional period for DC. Beginning with the watershed Crisis On Infinite Earths, most high-profile titles were relaunched, book by book — not just to take characters like Superman and Batman “back to basics,” but to open them up to new creative possibilities. Building on Crisis’ success, the publisher also tried to launch new titles from line-wide events.  By the early ‘90s, however, the speculator market was imposing its own will on the superhero books. …
Continue Reading »


Talking Comics with Tim: C. Tyler

You'll Never Know Book One: A Good and Decent Man

You'll Never Know Book One: A Good and Decent Man

C. Tyler‘s graphic memoir (the first book of three), You’ll Never Know (Book 1): A Good and Decent Man, has been getting a great deal of praise as of late. Our own, Chris Mautner, noted (in his review of Tyler’s book) that it “certainly deserves any accolades it receives”. The memoir (as described by Fantagraphics): “tells the story of the 50-something author’s relationship with her World War II veteran father, and how his war experience shaped her childhood and affected her relationships in adulthood. ‘You’ll Never Know’ refers not only to the title of her parents’ courtship song from that era, but also to the many challenges the author encountered in uncovering the difficult and painful truths about her Dad’s service — challenges exacerbated by her own tumultuous family life.” Even though she’s quite busy, she was generous enough to recently entertain a few of my questions via email.

C. Tyler: Before we get started, I have to say this first: Bill Murray, I love you and I’m ready to go on that date, so please call.

Now what were those questions?

Tim O’Shea: Are you annoyed, pleased or indifferent when reviewers of the book liken it on some level to Maus?

Tyler: Maus is such an important work. To be likened on some level to Maus: unbelievable. However, my answer comes more from a personal place.

When I first read the New York Times Review by Douglas Wolk, I was ready to bust out cryin’ with joy. You see, Art Spiegelman was one of the first official cartoonists I met. I was part of the fan team that helped with the first Raw promotions, hanging up fliers all over Manhattan. This was 1982 maybe? It felt so cool to be part of his inner circle and close to the early excitement he was feeling about Maus. I remember we were in a cab once on the way back from a Raw party and I was thinking how my Dad was over there, too, as part of the armed effort that eventually liberated his Dad. And his Mother. But I never believed that I could ever produce a work that would be mentioned in the same sentence.

Continue Reading »


Browse the Robot 6 Archives