Ghostbusters Archives | Robot 6 | The Comics Culture Blog

Funko offers a peek at ‘Suicide Squad’ and Spider-Gwen Pop! figures

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On the even of Toy Fair in New York City, Funko has offered a sneak peek at its booth that includes a first look at the Suicide Squad and Spider-Gwen Pop! vinyl figures.

You’ll also find photos of the company’s Suicide Squad Dorbz line, Pop! figures of Doctor Strange, Captain Marvel, Supergirl and the Ghostbusters reboot (which includes a peek at two of the film’s ghosts and Chris Hemsworth’s nerdy secretary).

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New ‘Ghostbusters’ bust bricks in film’s first LEGO set

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The first wave of tie-in products for director Paul Feig’s upcoming “Ghostbusters” film have arrived and they are brick-tacular. The debut LEGO set for the film, which stars a quartet of female comedians as the titular team, includes the Ecto-1 car and Ecto-2 bike as well as minifigures for the ‘Busters as well as their receptionist Kevin.

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Original Ghostbusters are back in new ‘LEGO Dimensions’ trailer

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Peter Venkman, Raymond Stantz, Egon Spengler and Winston Zeddemore strap on their proton packs in the new Ghostbusters trailer for LEGO Dimensions.

The Ghostbusters expansion pack for the toy-to-life game from WB Games and TT Games arrives today alongside the DC Comics Team Pack, featuring The Joker, Harley Quinn, The Joker’s Chopper and Quinn-mobile, and the Back to the Future and Doctor Who Fun Packs, containing Doc Brown and the Travelling Time Train, and a Cyberman and Dalek.

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Look inside LEGO’s ‘Ghostbusters’ Firehouse Headquarters

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If you were excited by the official announcement last month of LEGO’s Ghostbusters Firehouse Headquarters, just wait until you take a peek inside.

A series of photos released this morning by the Danish toymaker offers not only a close-up look at all nine minifgures (plus Slimer, Pink Ghost and Blue Ghost), but also a tour of of the fairly elaborate playset, which recreates the iconic firehouse from the beloved films. There’s reception, living quarters, a laboratory, a containment unit and even a bathroom. Plus, a fire pole, of course.

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LEGO unveils its ‘Ghostbusters’ Firehouse Headquarters set

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Following an online leak last week, LEGO has officially revealed its Ghostbusters Firehouse Headquarters, set to arrive in stores in January.

Comprised of 4,634 pieces, the two-story firehouse boasts a laboratory, living quarters, a containment unit and a fire pole (naturally). LEGO didn’t skimp on the minifigures, either: There’s nine of ‘em — Peter Venkman, Raymond Stantz, Egon Spengler, Winston Zeddemore, Janine Melnitz, Dana Barrett, Louis Tully, Zombie Driver and Library Ghost – plus, Slimer, Pink Ghost and Blue Ghost.

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Watch ‘The Real Ghostbusters’ intro recreated in 3D animation

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As beloved as the first two Ghostbusters movies are, for many kids in the mid-1980s and early ’90s, the animated television series was effectively the “real” Ghostbusters.

Airing for a whopping seven seasons, The Real Ghostbusters continued the story of the original film, albeit with drastically different-sounding, and -looking, characters (Egon’s gravity-defying blond coif was a supernatural phenomenon all its own). The series also retained Ray Parker Jr.’s infectious movie theme, which was used for the cartoon’s minute-long premise-establishing opening credits.

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NYCC: Because Ghostbusters shoes make you feel good

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If you already own the signature khaki coveralls and indispensable proton pack, you may want to complete the ensemble with a pair of hand-made, limited-edition Ghostbusters sneakers.

Unveiled this week at New York Comic Con by Australian company Nookiee, the officially licensed shoes come in a handful of styles for men and women: there are those inspired by the Ghostbuster suit, complete with “elbow pads” on the heels and “Stantz,” “Spengler,” “Venkman” or “Zeddemore” stitched on the side; the “no ghost” variety, in black or white; and “Gozer.”

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Raphael, Slimer and other ’80s icons reimagined as classical sculptures

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Inspired by the Hellenistic period, ceramic artist Brett Kern has focus is ample talents on a series of sculptures of pop-culture characters in a parody of the classics. But these aren’t just any characters, they’re beloved ’80s icons: Raphael from Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Slimer from Ghostbusters, E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial, and Alf from, well, Alf (also, Melmac).

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‘LEGO Dimensions’ reveals ‘Ghostbusters’ expansion packs

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Following fast on the heels of Wednesday’s “Adventure Worlds” trailer, Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment and TT Games have unveiled the Ghostbusters expansion packs for their LEGO Dimensions toy-to-life game.

Announced at GamesCom in Germany, they include a level pack, featuring a playable Peter Venkman playable minifigure, the ECTO-1 and a ghost trap, and two fun packs: one containing Slimer and the other the Stay Puft Marshmallow Man.

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IDW crosses the streams with ‘Ghostbusters: Get Real’

ghostbustersThe last time IDW Publishing’s Ghostbusters comic was involved in a crossover, it was a very weird pairing with the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. For the new event, the Ghostbusters are teamed with a more natural, but perhaps weirder franchise: another version of the Ghostbusters.

Specifically, The Real Ghostbusters, the 1986-1991 animated series that spun out of the 1984 film and spawned a popular toy line two comic book titles. The oddly applied adjective “Real” came about to further distinguish these Ghostbusters from those that starred in a 1986 Filmation cartoon based on a mostly forgotten 1975 Ghost Busters TV series.

That’s why this series is called Ghostbusters: Get Real. Get it? (Now that I think of it, maybe the weirdest of all possible Ghostbusters crossovers would be one involving those from the ’84 film with those from the ’75 TV show.)

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Back to the past — and the Future — in today’s Shelf Porn

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Happy Saturday and welcome to Shelf Porn! Today we feature a return engagement from one of my favorite Shelf Porn contributions from last year, Eric, who showed us his wonderful collection of homemade movie props. He’s moved his collection into a new area and has added several cool items since he last appeared here.

If you’d like to see your collection right here on Robot 6, you can find the details on submitting at the end of this post.

And now, once again, here’s Eric …

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Krispy Kreme rolls out ‘Ghostbusters’-themed doughnuts

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The Ghostbusters 30th-anniversary celebration is about to get delicious.

Krispy Kreme has partnered with Sony Pictures to introduce Ghostbusters and Stay Puft Marshmallow doughnuts, available Sept. 29-Oct. 31 at participating U.S. and Canadian locations. While supplies last, naturally.

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Food or Comics? | Unsweetened chocolate or Uncanny X-Men

Welcome to Food or Comics?, where every week we talk about what comics we’d buy at our local comic shop based on certain spending limits — $15 and $30 — as well as what we’d get if we had extra money or a gift card to spend on a splurge item.

Check out Diamond’s release list or ComicList, and tell us what you’re getting in our comments field.

Uncanny X-Men #1

Corey Blake

If I had $15, I’d be tempted to blow it all on the recolored Death of Superman collection for the ’90s nostalgia. But then I’d probably flip through it and come to my senses, and instead get something new like Fatale #12 ($3.50) by Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips, which looks like it’s going to be a trip, flashing back to Medieval times but self-contained as a good entry point for new readers. That’s smart comics. Speaking of smarty-pants, I’d probably get The Manhattan Projects #9 ($3.50) by Jonathan Hickman and Nick Pitarra. It’s the first part of a two-part story about scientists trying to take over the world. There will probably be lots of words that leave me dizzy. I likely wouldn’t be able to resist Matt Wagner writing The Shadow: Year One #1 ($3.99) because, you know, The Shadow knows. I haven’t been following IDW’s G.I. Joe universe but G.I. Joe #1 ($3.99) by Fred Van Lente and Steve Kurth seems like a good opportunity to try it out. And I’d finish it off with Cyber Force #3 by Marc Silvestri and Koi Pham because it’s free.

With $30, I would add to the above. Darkhawk is on the cover of Avengers Arena #4 ($2.99) by Dennis Hopeless and Alessandro Vitti, so I’d be compelled to buy that. I’ve been meaning to check out Erik Burnham and Dan Schoening’s Ghostbusters since I hear it’s real fun, so the relaunched Ghostbusters #1 ($3.99) is a perfect opportunity. Morning Glories #24 ($2.99) by Nick Spencer and Joe Eisma seems too intriguing to pass up. I am so behind on the X-books, but I’d be real tempted to try Brian Michael Bendis and Chris Bachalo’s Uncanny X-Men #1 ($3.99).

My splurge item would be tough. I’d be real tempted to get either the Iron Man Omnibus collecting the entire run of David Michelinie, Bob Layton and John Romita Jr., including the famous alcoholism story, or Counter X: Generation X – Four Days by Brian Wood. But I’d probably end up instead getting the Daredevil By Mark Waid, Vol. 1 hardcover for $35. I don’t know, do I need to justify this purchase? It’s probably the most beloved superhero comic of last year, maybe for the last couple of years. It paved the way for similarly rejuvenating series at Marvel like Hawkeye, Captain Marvel, and Young Avengers. The art by Paolo Rivera and Marcos Martin is swoon-worthy. And it wants to be on my bookshelf, dagnabbit!

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The trouble with adaptation comics

Dismissed as a fad 10 years ago, big-screen adaptations bring comic book characters to millions of people every year. Just when you think they’ve peaked, out comes another blockbuster that tops the previous one. Sure, there are also the moderate hits and outright stinkers, but then there arrives an Iron Man or a Dark Knight or a Walking Dead or an Avengers. They’ve long passed the point of being a fluke. They even influence the collectors’ market, with optioning deals causing spikes in sales of back issues and original art, most recently demonstrated by the crazy prices people are willing to pay on eBay for The Walking Dead #1.

So if going from comics to film and television is so great, why is the reverse so rarely true? Comic books that adapt stories from other media (TV, film, video games, books, etc.) are only sometimes great and rarely garner the same kind of enthusiasm and attention. Someone who’s better at Photoshop than me should whip up one of those “said no one ever” images because no one has ever said, “I can’t wait for my favorite blockbuster movie to get adapted into a comic.” And yet most of us could barely keep our composure over the prospects of seeing Marvel’s The Avengers.

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Comics A.M. | Industry’s digital inroads; exploiting new comics formats

"Insufferable," by Mark Waid and Peter Krause

Digital comics | George Gene Gustines takes a quick trip through the landscape of digital comics, dropping in on Mark Waid, comiXology’s David Steinberger and Marvel’s Avengers vs. X-Men Infinite Comic. Much of this is familiar territory to regular readers of this blog, but hey, it’s The New York Times noticing digital comics! [The New York Times]

Digital comics | FreakAngels writer Warren Ellis looks at three recent digital comics, noting how they all limit themselves to “two-tier storytelling”: “Accepting and exploiting new limitations is always part of a new format. These three projects, though, can’t produce even a full-page spread without some serious scheming and dancing.” [Warren Ellis]

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