Gone to Amerikay Archives - Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

Food or Comics? | Sharknife shish kebab

Welcome to Food or Comics?, where every week we talk about what comics we’d buy at our local comic shop based on certain spending limits — $15 and $30 — as well as what we’d get if we had extra money or a gift card to spend on a splurge item.

Check out Diamond’s release list or ComicList, and tell us what you’re getting in our comments field.

Sharknife, Volume 2: Double Z

Chris Arrant

If I had $15, I’d skip lunch and dig in to the overdue Choker #6 (Image, $3.99). I almost considered waiting for the trade on this one, but I know once I see the shiny object in front of me in stores I’ll want to find out the ending to Ben McCool and Ben Templesmith’s story. After that I’d get Uncanny X-Force #23 (Marvel, $3.99), which still holds the crown for my favorite current Marvel book. I was hesitant of Remender & co. going off into Otherworld despite my fascination with the realm going back to my Excalibur days, but I’m being rewarded with good story for my allegiance. The only thing it’s missing is an appendix reminding me of older stories that he references here. Last up would be a two-fer with Spaceman #5 (DC/Vertigo, $2.99) and Walking Dead #95 (Image, $2.99). I’ve talked about both at length here, and they continue to buffet me with greatness.

If I had $30, I’d first snag Daredevil #10 (Marvel, $2.99) to see more of Paolo Rivera’s work over the solid storytelling by Mark Waid. Then, I’d rub my eyes to make sure I’m not seeing things and pick-up the 5+ year delayed book Sharknife, Vol. 2 (Oni, $11.99). I’ve been a big fan of Corey’s work back when he was doing inspired Mega Man rip-offs, and the chance that I’ll finally see this sequel is exciting and heartbreaking. I hope the quality of the book inside is enough to stave off my feelings about the severe delay the book had.

And for splurging, I’d spend my CBR paycheck on Gone To Amerikay (DC/Vertigo, $24.99). This book is at the intersection of three reasons I’d buy it: Colleen Doran, Derek McCulloch and historical Irish narratives. I’d hold McCulloch’s Stagger Lee up to any graphic novel of the past decade in terms of skill and potency, so to see him pair that with Colleen Doran’s crafty linework bears my immediate attention.

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Colleen Doran returns to comics

OK, she was never really gone … but lately there has been a rush of news regarding her work. At Comic-Con International last week DC Comic highlighted her next major project for Vertigo Gone to Amerikay, with writer Derek McCulloch, and over the weekend she posted some sketches she did for the ill-fated JMS reboot of Wonder Woman. To cap it all off, she’s now on Twitter!

Described by Doran as a story of Irish immigration to the United States, her writer Derek McCulloch spoke at length about the book at Comic-Con. “It’s a story about people emigrating to America from Ireland over the course of 140 years,” said the writer. “It’s a great big historical epic with a crime story and a ghost story and a couple of love stories and all kinds of things in it.”

Doran is best known for her long-running independent series A Distant Soil, but her work has been on my mind recently because of her graphic novel Orbiter with Warren Ellis and the final voyage of the U.S. space shuttle. Plans to do a second graphic novel with Ellis, titled Stealth Tribes, seemed to go on the backburner due to Ellis’ workload, freeing her up for Gone To Amerikay as well as Mangaman with novelist Barry Lyga.


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