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Comics A.M. | This weekend, it’s Small Press Expo

SPX

SPX

Conventions | With the 20th Small Press Expo kicking off Saturday in Bethesda, Maryland, The Washington Post’s Lori McCue singles out three of the show’s biggest draws: appearances by Jules Feiffer, Lynda Barry and Bob Mankoff. Meanwhile, Michael Cavna spotlights Fear, My Dear, the new release from convention guest Dean Haspiel. [The Washington Post]

Creators | As he prepared to head out to Small Press Expo, Farel Dalrymple paused for an audio interview about his newest book, The Wrenchies, which will debut at the show. [Comics Grinder]

Creators | Writer Tom Taylor teases what we can expect in his new Superior Iron Man series. [Previews World]

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Comics A.M. | Salt Lake Comic Con attendees were mostly local

Salt Lake Comic Con

Salt Lake Comic Con

Conventions | Salt Lake Comic Con may have achieved near-San-Diego proportions in just two years, with an estimated 120,000 attendees, but most of those seem to be locals, according to Scott Veck of Visit Salt Lake: Just 800 hotel rooms were booked through the local tourist organization, as opposed to 3,000 for the big Outdoor Retailers trade show. About 15 percent of Salt Lake Comic Con attendees were from out of state. [Fox News 13]

Creators | Mumbai, India, editorial cartoonist Kanika Mishra was infuriated when controversial religious leader Asaram Bapu said the victim of a highly publicized gang rape shared responsibility for the crime. When the news broke that Asaram was accused of raping the 16-year-old daughter of one of his followers, Mishra drew a series of cartoons about it — and then, when his supporters threatened and harassed her, she drew about that, too: “I decided not to send this message that I am afraid of these goons. I made more and more cartoons on Asaram as his followers abused and threatened me.” Mishra is one of two recipients of this year’s Cartoonists Rights Network International Award for Courage in Editorial Cartooning. [India West]

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Comics A.M. | Salt Lake Comic Con draws a reported 120,000

Salt Lake Comic Con

Salt Lake Comic Con

Conventions | Attendance at the second annual Salt Lake Comic Con was estimated at between 120,000 and 130,000, putting it on a par with the big shows like Comic-Con International in San Diego and New York Comic Con. Even better, Stan Lee proclaimed it “the greatest comic con in the world” (but he probably says that to all the shows). [The Salt Lake Tribune]

Conventions | The scale of the first Las Cruces [New Mexico] Comic Con was considerably smaller, with expected attendance of 3,000 to 5,000, but organizers were pleased with the event, which featured a Yu-Gi-Oh! tournament, a Comic Strip Burlesque show, and appearances by Jim Steranko, Power Rangers stuntman Jason Ybarra, and the 1966 Batmobile. [Las Cruces Sun-News]

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Comics A.M. | Books-A-Million sees growth in graphic novel sales

Books-A-Million

Books-A-Million

Retailing | Books-A-Million had a good second quarter, and CEO Terry Finley gives at least part of the credit to graphic novels: “We also saw strong growth in the graphic novel category, with continued success with titles related to AMC’s The Walking Dead series and a renewed interest in several manga series [that] drove sales increases.” And to boost that, the retail chain, which operates more than 250 stores nationwide, is planning Marvel promotions throughout September. [ICv2]

Conventions | Salt Lake Comic Con co-founder Dan Farr is trying to measure how much money attendees are spending. In terms of hotel beds, at least, the convention seems to be dwarfed by trade shows, but with people coming to Salt Lake City from 48 states for the recent spinoff event FanXperience, that may be changing. Still, even in San Diego, attendees spend only about $600 per person; if Salt Lake attendees are similarly thrifty, the convention may not be a significant player in the Salt Lake City convention scene. [The Salt Lake Tribune]

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Raise your glass to fallen Shelf Porn from Napa, California

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Happy Saturday and welcome to Shelf Porn, our weekly look at one fan’s collection. Today’s Shelf Porn only has one picture to go with it, but there’s a timely and compelling story behind it that any fan with a collection they fear could someday be ruined by Mother Nature will appreciate.

If you’d like to see your collection featured here on ROBOT 6, you can find instructions on how to do so at the end of this post.

And now let’s hear from C.T. from Napa, California …

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Comic Bento: It’s like Loot Crate, but with graphic novels

comic bentoI somehow managed to miss the launch of Comic Bento, a monthly graphic-novel subscription service in the tradition of Loot Crate.

A project of Blind Ferret, Comic Bento picks up where Pullist left off: Each month, a themed selection of graphic novels, from publishers ranging from DC Comics and Marvel to Oni Press and Image Comics, is boxed up (with some other goodies) and shipped to subscribers. For August, the theme is science fiction.

According to the website, it amounts to more than $50 worth of graphic novels for a price as low as $17.95 a month, plus shipping. Of course, the cost depends on which subscription plan you choose. One month is $20 (plus $5 shipping within the United States); a three-month plan works out to $18.34 a month, and so on.

A perusal of Comic Bento’s FAQ also turns up an interesting tidbit: For (truthful) subscribers under the age of 13 will receive boxes of family-friendly comics.

Those interested have 16-plus days to sign up for the September box. You can watch a Comic Bento unboxing video and review below.

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In ‘Sisters,’ Raina Telgemeier captures small details of family life

SISTERS-tease

Raina Telgemeier’s Sisters is about a car trip in the same way that her earlier graphic memoir Smile is about having dental work: It forms an organizing principle for a story about changing relationships, a story built up of small incidents that are all linked to this single narrative thread.

That sounds complicated for a book written for 10-year-olds, but Telgemeier makes it look easy. It’s as if she’s swapping stories about her childhood — remember that time we got a snake, and then we lost it? And although she’s writing about growing up in San Francisco in the 1980s and early 1990s, the story has a timeless feel (the only clues to the setting are teenage Raina’s Walkman and the fact that no one has a cell phone).

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Comics A.M. | At Dubai con, women artists outnumbered men

A cosplayer at the Middle East Film & Comic Con

A cosplayer at the Middle East Film & Comic Con

Conventions | Vocativ put together an interesting, if somewhat late, video report about the Middle East Film & Comic Con in Dubai, often viewed by Westerners as a conservative Muslim city. Yet the April convention, which drew about 35,000 attendees, featured both women in traditional hijabs and cosplayers in somewhat-revealing costumes. More interesting still, the number of women artists outnumbered the men. The piece also touches upon the reaction to the new Ms. Marvel, a Muslim teenager from New Jersey. [Vocativ]

Creators | “Never having known how to work in this style, suddenly in my 80s, I discover I can”: Jules Feiffer talks about his latest graphic novel, Kill My Mother, a noir-ish tale that is a sharp departure from his earlier work. [Los Angeles Times]

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Comics, action figures and more from Sheffield, England

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Happy Saturday and welcome to Shelf Porn, where each week we feature one fan’s collection. Today’s shelves come from Adrian in Sheffield, England, who shows off his collection of comics, action figures and more.

If you’d like to see your collection featured here, you can find instructions at the end of this post.

And now let’s hear from Adrian …

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Comics A.M. | Egyptian cartoonist Mostafa Hussein passes away

Mostafa Hussein

Mostafa Hussein

Passings | Egyptian cartoonist Mostafa Hussein died Saturday following a lengthy battle with cancer. He was 79. Hussein had been a cartoonist for the state-owned Al Akbar newspaper since 1974, and was often accused of being sympathetic to those in power. His final cartoon, published in Al Akbar two days before he died, was inscribed “I ??don’t have time to finish this cartoon, forgive me. I will miss you.” [Ahram Online]

Awards | The Cartoonist Rights Network International (CRNI) has announced the winners of this year’s Award for Courage in Editorial Cartooning, and for the first time in the history of the award they are women: Indian cartoonist Kanika Mishra and Palestinian cartoonist Majda Shaheen. Mishra faced death threats for her cartoons about a religious leader who raped a 16-year-old (and eventually went to prison); Shaheen also was threatened with violence after she drew a cartoon depicting the Al-Quds Brigades as a dog in a cartoon critiquing Gaza Prime Minister Ismail Haniyeh’s relationship with the organization. [Comic Riffs]

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Comics A.M. | Disney layoffs hit DisneyToon Studios

Planes: Fire & Rescue

Planes: Fire & Rescue

Business | Marvel parent company Disney has reportedly laid off as many as 17 of the 60 full-time employees at DisneyToon Studio, the Glendale, California-based division that produces animated direct-to-video sequels and prequels, such as The Lion King 1 1/2 and Mulan II, the Disney Fairies releases and the occasional feature film, most recently Planes: Fire & Rescue. While Disney has been cutting positions throughout the company for the past few years — dating back to 2011 with the elimination of 200 jobs in its interactive division and about a dozen at Marvel — Variety chalks up these layoffs to the declining home-video market. [Variety, Deadline]

Passings | Dan Lynch, former editorial cartoonist for the Fort Wayne Journal Gazette, died Sunday at age 67. Lynch also worked for the Kansas City Times, and his cartoons were syndicated nationally and appeared in Time and Newsweek. However, his career was cut short by a debilitating stroke in 2001. “Dan had (what I thought was) a fabulous drawing style,” said Julie Inskeep, publisher and president of The Journal Gazette. “And, in the 20-plus years he worked at the JG, he provided a vast array of cartoon topics – always welcome, though not always in agreement with our editorial board. But he got people to think and react in his special and powerful way.” [Fort Wayne Journal Gazette]

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A Marvel-ous collection of Shelf Porn from Canada

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Hello and welcome to Shelf Porn, our weekly glance into one fan’s collection. Today’s collection comes from Robert in Canada, who shows us his comics, graphic novels and more.

If you’d like to see your collection featured here on Robot 6, you can find complete details at the end of this post.

And now here’s Robert …

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Comics A.M. | O’Malley’s ‘Seconds’ has strong bookstore debut

Seconds

Seconds

Publishing | Seconds, by Scott Pilgrim creator Bryan Lee O’Malley, had an impressive debut, landing at No. 2 and No. 5 on the BookScan chart of graphic novels sold in the book channel in July. The book had a standard edition and a Barnes & Nobles exclusive. ICv2 reckons if there had been a single edition, Seconds would have topped the list; instead, the No. 1 spot went to the latest volume of Naruto. It was also a good month for DC Comics, which charted seven titles, six of which involve Batman.[ICv2]

Publishing | In an overview of the comics and graphic novel market, ICv2 reports direct market retailers are optimistic despite flat sales in the first half of the year. [ICv2]

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Ellis and Allred’s Bacardi graphic novel debuts online

bacardi

Warren Ellis and Michael Allred’s collaboration The Spirit of Bacardi, which retraces the history of the company, has made its online debut.

As we noted last month, the graphic novel — commissioned by Bacardi — focuses on Emilio Bacardi, son of Bacardi creator Don Facundo Bacardí Massó, “and his tireless work for Cuban independence from Spain in the late 1800s.” Emilio Bacardí was imprisoned and exiled, but eventually became the first freely elected mayor of Santiago de Cuba.

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SDCC | Fantagraphics to publish Liz Suburbia’s ‘Sacred Heart’

SacredHeartCoverFantagraphics announced today at Comic-Con International that it will publish Liz Suburbia’s webcomic Sacred Heart as a one-shot graphic novel.

Sacred Heart is set in a small town where all the adults have mysteriously disappeared and the teenagers rule. The situation is not total anarchy, and that’s one of the things that makes it so interesting — order has broken down in some ways but not in others. It’s been running online for a number of years, but Suburbia is completely redrawing the comic and Fantagraphics will publish it in a single volume— although the cartoonist says there will be more to come.

ROBOT 6 spoke with Suburbia about Sacred Heart and how it has evolved so far.

Brigid Alverson: Sacred Heart is about a town that seems to be full of high-school kids but no adults or younger children. Can you give us an idea about what’s going on?

In the first draft (the one that’s online) it’s kind of a secret, but in the final print version it’s more clear that their parents left almost four years ago and promised to return in about four years’ time.

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