Gregg Hurwitz Archives - Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

A Month of Wednesdays | ‘Batman: The Dark Knight,’ ‘Battle of The Atom’ and more

dark knight v. 3Batman: The Dark Knight Vol. 3: Mad (DC Comics): Poor Batman. His new continuity is only a few years old, and already he’s suffering from threat inflation, so that now seemingly every crime is one that could level Gotham City and every villain a mass-murderer with a three-figure body count to rival The Joker’s.

In this volume — collecting six issues and an annual from writer Gregg Hurwitz’s run on The Dark Knight — it’s The Mad Hatter’s turn for an upgrade. A villain formerly portrayed as either obsessed with hats or with Lewis Carrol’s Alice books or both, depending on the writer, Jervis Tetch here begins his road to villainy by killing a rabbit, then uses a step-ladder to reach the face of an underling who he proceeds to murder by plunging his thumbs into the victim’s eyes. From there, he murders a housewife by bashing her head in with an iron,  he kills hundreds—hundreds!—of Gothamites through his mind-control technology, and he then has Batman’s girlfriend killed…by having her beaten to death in front of him.

In response, Batman tears one of the Tweedles’ jaws off, beats the diminutive Hatter until he’s drenched in his villain’s blood, then tosses him into a pond to drown until Alfred reminds him that he can’t kill the Hatter, or else he’ll be no different from him. I don’t think Batman should ever resort to lethal force, but Alfred’s argument isn’t all that powerful as presented here, given that one side of the scale has a madman murdering scores of innocents, and the other has Batman killing said killer.

That’s not the only surprisingly cliched bit of the story, which invents a new origin full of childhood trauma for Jervis Tetch akin to those Hurwitz previously gave The Scarecrow and The Penguin. Batman also decides he loves his current girlfriend, reluctantly reveals his secret identity to her and then, the very next night, one of his foes murders her while attempting to torture Batman’s secret identity out of her.

It’s a pretty problematic plot, to say the last.

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This week DC’s magic number isn’t 52, it’s 27

TEC #27 coverWhile DC Comics sacrificed some bragging rights in 2011 when it rebooted its superhero line, even the never-before-renumbered Action Comics and Detective Comics, one consequence of relaunching TEC was that it was only a matter of time — 26 months, to be exact — before the company got around to publishing a new Detective Comics #27. And that the second Detective Comics #27 would see release during the 75th year of Batman’s career, well, all the better.

The first Detective Comics #27, published in 1939, was, of course, the first appearance of Batman. The anthology’s cover was surrendered to an arresting image of a spooky man in tights, wearing a bat-mask and sporting huge bat-like wings, scooping up a gangster in a headlock while swinging in front of the yellow field above a city skyline. “Starting this issue,” the cover trumpted, “The Amazing and Unique Adventures of The Batman.”  Inside, Bob Kane and Bill Finger’s pulp- and film-inspired detective hero cracked the “The Case of the Chemical Syndicate,” and the amazing and unique adventures begun therein have yet to cease.

DC has honored that milestone in various ways over the years, with notable celebrations including Michael Uslan and Peter Snejbjerg’s 2003 Elseworlds one-shot Batman: Detective No. 27, and 1991′s Detective Comics #627, in which the Alan Grant/Norm Breyfogle and Marv Wolfman/Jim Aparo creative teams did their own takes on “The Case of the Chemical Syndicate,” and both the original story and a 30th-anniversary version by Mike Friedrich and Bob Brown were reprinted.

This week brings Detective Comics (Vol. 2) #27, and another opportunity to celebrate that original issue, and Batman’s 75th anniversary, which DC does in a 90-page, prestige-format special issue — essentially a trade paperback with some ads in it — featuring contributions from the writers of all four of the main Batman books of the moment and about as strong a list of contributing artists as a reader could hope for.

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Talking Comics with Tim | Gregg Hurwitz

Batman: The Dark Knight 13

Gregg Hurwitz is in the middle of writing an engaging exploration of the Scarecrow’s New 52 origin in Batman: The Dark Knight (as well as fresh off of an Issue 0, in which the killer of Bruce Wayne’s parents [Joe Chill] is detailed). Right before heading out to New York Comic Con last week, Hurwitz answered five questions that delved into his comics work in addition to his new prose novel The Survivor. I’m grateful to Hurwitz for squeezing me into his slammed schedule. After enjoying the interview, please be sure to check out CBR News’ interview with Hurwitz from August, and pick up Batman: The Dark Knight 13 when it goes on sale Oct. 24. Also, if you want to get a taste for The Survivor, please be sure to read a chapter here for free.

Tim O’Shea: I love the line you wrote connecting Thomas Wayne and Atticus Finch in Issue 0. What was it about the two characters that allowed you to make that connection?

Gregg Hurwitz: I think it’s an interesting contrast between the type of knock-you-over hero that Batman is and the quieter heroes we may encounter in our everyday lives. Atticus Finch has always symbolized the latter to me — a man of morals, quiet but stalwart and willing to do the right thing no matter the cost. That to me is the difference between Thomas and Bruce as well.

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