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SDCC ’11 | Guillermo del Toro’s The Strain comes to Dark Horse

Following through on its teaser from earlier this week, Dark Horse announced this morning that it will publish an adaptation of The Strain, the trilogy of sci-fi vampire novels by filmmaker Guillermo del Toro and Chuck Hogan.

Variety reports that the 24-issue series, which launches on Dec. 14, will be supervised by del Toro and produced by Stray Bullets writer David Lapham and Butcher Baker, The Righteous Maker artist Mike Huddleston. Each issue will receive a same-day digital release.

“I supervise everything,” del Toro tells the trade paper. “I give my opinion on the art, the covers, the screenplays. [Lapham] is capturing the novel very well.”

Published in 2009, The Strain follows a biohazard expert and an elderly Holocaust survivor who battle a vampiric virus that breaks out in New York City. The 2010 follow-up The Fall details the spread of the virus and a war that breaks out between Old World and New world vampires. Third novel, The Night Eternal, will be released in October.

According to Variety, The Strain will run as an eight-issue series, ending in July 2012, with the eight-part The Fall debuting later that year.

Further information will be revealed tonight at Comic-Con International in San Diego at the Dark Horse booth. Stay tuned to Comic Book Resources for more details.

Dark Horse teases three new projects they’ll announce Wednesday

Dark Horse Comics released the third and final teaser for projects they’ll announce on Wednesday night during Preview Night at the San Diego Comic-Con. Based on the last name at the top and the image, I’m gonna go out on a limb here and guess that one of the three projects they’ll announce is a comic adaptation of Guillermo Del Toro and Chuck Hogan’s The Strain. But I could be wrong.

Unfortunately, the previous two teasers aren’t as easy to crack … check’em out after the jump.

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Alamo Drafthouse’s awesome artistic interpretations of Hellboy movie posters

Mondo's Hellboy poster

We’ve sung the praises of the awesome posters that Mondo, the collectible art boutique arm of the Alamo Drafthouse Cinema, has done for various film debuts like Scott Pilgrim and Iron Man 2. In December, the site announced a “Director’s Series” of posters from director Guillermo del Toro, and this Friday will see the release of two posters that should be popular with fans of his adaptation of Mike Mignola’s signature character — Hellboy and Hellboy 2: The Golden Army.

The poster above for Hellboy is by Florian Bertmer and will be limited to 240 copies. The poster for its sequel, which you can see after the jump, is by Ken Taylor. It’s limited to 360 copies, and each of them costs $45. Look for them on the site this Friday, or follow them on Twitter to watch for an “on sale now” announcement.

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Six by 6 by 6 | Van Jensen’s six favorite horror comics & movies

House by Josh Simmons

Editor’s note: As a part of Robot 666 Week, we welcome guest contributor Van Jensen, writer of Pinocchio, Vampire Slayer and its upcoming sequel.

by Van Jensen

I was on a panel with Steve Niles and Bernie Wrightson to discuss horror comics earlier this year, and I admitted that I didn’t really like horror as a genre. I can’t even see a trailer for Saw MCXVII (or whatever number they’re up to) without feeling repulsed. But Steve and Bernie talked me down from the ledge. The problem isn’t so much with the horror genre, it’s with the trend of comics and movies that use gore as a substitute for real fright. So here’s my list of favorite horror comics and films, and they’re all projects that rely heavily on atmosphere and thrills (the real hallmarks of horror) rather than buckets of blood.

1. House, by Josh Simmons.

Simmons’ debut graphic novel is a relatively simple story, with three teenagers exploring a giant old house in the woods. Things go wrong, which is predictable, but in an unpredictable way. Simmons uses no words through the entire story, but his real accomplishment is utilizing the design of the pages to deliver an increasingly claustrophobic, disorienting and terrifying story.

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