Herge Archives - Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

Winnipeg library returns ‘Tintin’ to shelves — in the adult section

tintin in america

The Winnipeg Public Library is returning Herge’s Tintin in America to its shelves — but in the adult graphic novel section, not the children’s area.

The book was pulled for review in March following news that the Chapters bookstore in Winnipeg had briefly removed copies from its shelves due to a complaint about the portrayal of Native Americans. An email sent to all library branches at that time reveals Tintin in America wasn’t supposed to be on the shelves in the first place.

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Court rules Moulinsart doesn’t own all the Tintin rights

tintin

Surprising virtually everyone, a Dutch court has ruled that Moulinsart SA, which fiercely protects Herge’s creations, doesn’t actually own all the rights to Tintin.

Agence France-Presse reports the commercial and copyright arm of the Herge Foundation had sued a small Dutch fan club in 2012, claiming it failed to secure the rights to republish Tintin art in one of its fanzines. However, what might’ve seemed like a fairly straightforward case of copyright versus fair use was turned on its ear when the attorney for the Herge Society fan club produced a 1942 document in which the author signed over Tintin’s publishing rights to his publisher Casterman.

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Tintin is often knocked out but never motion sick, study finds

tintin

Despite suffering a staggering 244 health issues over the course of his nearly five-decade career, Tintin has demonstrated an “almost superhuman” resistance to trauma.

That’s the conclusion made by a group of physicians from the Sorbonne University in Paris and the University of Atlanta following a detailed analysis of 23 of the boy reporter’s 24 adventures.

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Tintin takes flight, on the side of a Brussels Airlines jet

brussels airlines-tintin3

Brussels Airlines has repainted an Airbus A320 to resemble the famous shark-shaped submarine from Herge’s 1944 album Red Rackham’s Treasure to serve as an ambassador of Belgium.

Rechristened Rackham, the jet depicts boy reporter Tintin and his faithful dog Snowy looking from the “submarine’s” cockpit; the image is accompanied by the slogan “Brussels Airlines — We fly you to the home of Tintin.”

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Store briefly removes ‘Tintin in America’ after racism complaint

tintin in americaA Chapters bookstore in Winnipeg temporarily removed Herge’s Tintin in America on Saturday following a complaint by a First Nations educator that the comic contains “racist images.” However, CBC News reports the book had been returned to shelves by Monday, after the chain determined its content doesn’t violate the company’s policy.

Serialized from September 1931 to October 1932, Tintin in America chronicles the adventures of the boy reporter and his dog Snowy as they investigate organized crime in Chicago and pursue mob boss Bobby Smiles West to “Redskin City,” becoming captives of an easily manipulated Blackfoot tribe in the process.

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Comics A.M. | Sotheby’s comics art auction rings up $4.1 million

The Rocketeer, by Dave Stevens

The Rocketeer, by Dave Stevens

Auctions | Sotheby’s auction of comics and comics art over the weekend in Paris brought in about $4.1 million for 189 works, including Hergé’s cover art for the 10th-anniversary issue of Le Petit Vingtième (the magazine where Tintin first ran), several Tintin pages, and pieces by Hugo Pratt, Charles Burns and Osamu Tezuka. An acrylic and crayon illustration by Dave Stevens created in 1988 for the first issue of The Rocketeer Adventure Magazine (at right) fetched $66,017, a record for the late artist’s work. [Paul Gravett, Artnet]

Creators | “Hobbes was as much my alter-ego as Calvin was”: In an excerpt from the new book Exploring Calvin and Hobbes, Bill Watterson talks about how he came to comics, how he developed the style and characters of Calvin and Hobbes, and the continuing popularity of the strip years after it stopped running in newspapers. [Comic Riffs]

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‘Tintin’ cover sells for near-record $2.8 million at auction

tintin-shooting star-colorThe original cover for the 1942 Tintin book The Shooting Star sold at auction for more than $2.8 million, just shy of the record price paid last year for a piece of Hergé’s art.

Comic book dealers Petits Papiers-Huberty-Breyne told Agence France-Presse the yellowing art was purchased by a European investor who “is neither Belgian nor French.” No other details about the buyer’s identity were disclosed.

The Shooting Star cover is one of just five that remains in the hands of private collectors. Most of  Hergé’s work is held by Moulinsart, the Brussels-based organization established in 1987 by the cartoonist’s widow Fanny Rodwell

The 10th volume of The Adventures of Tintin, The Shooting Star follows Tintin, his faithful dog Snowy and his friend Captain Haddock as they take part in a scientific expedition to the Arctic Ocean to find a meteorite before it’s uncovered by a rival team.

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Original ‘Tintin’ cover could fetch as much as $2.9 million

tintin-shooting star-colorHergé’s original cover art for the 1942 Tintin book The Shooting Star is expected to sell for as much as $2.9 million when it goes up for auction at the Brussels Antiques and Fine Arts Fair, which kicks off Saturday in Belgium.

It’s a hefty sum that could rival the record price paid in May for an original double-page spread created by the Belgian artist for the inside covers of Tintin books published between 1937 and 1958. Another drawing of Tintin, created by Hergé in 1939 for the cover of the weekly magazine Le Petit Vingtième, sold last month for $670,000.

Agence France-Presse notes that the Shooting Star cover was one of just five that remains in the hands of private collectors. Most of  Hergé’s work is held by Moulinsart (aka the Hergé Foundation), the Brussels-based organization establshed in 1987 by the cartoonist’s widow Fanny Rodwell. The foundation oversees the Hergé estate as well as the Hergé Museum outside Brussels.

The 10th volume of The Adventures of Tintin, The Shooting Star follows Tintin, his faithful dog Snowy and his friend Captain Haddock as they take part in a scientific expedition to the Arctic Ocean to find a meteorite before it’s uncovered by a rival team.

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10 comic characters drawn in the style of 10 artists

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The comics medium allows for diverse interpretations of characters, both narratively and visually. Artist Jaakko Seppälä has taken 10 of the most iconic comic characters — from Asterix to Batman to Lucy van Pelt — drawn in the style of 10 famous artists (including their respective creators or most popular illustrators).

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High marks for Monte Beauchamp’s ‘Masterful Marks’

masterful marksBlab founder and editor Monte Beauchamp’s latest book, Masterful Marks: Cartoonists Who Changed the World, bears a subtitle that begs to be parsed, almost as much as it begs to be read.

He’s gathered a Murderers’ Row of great contributors and collaborators to tell the life’s stories of 16 cartoonists, in the most obvious format to do so — comics, of course.

But what, exactly, constitutes a cartoonist? Some of those included might have worked at one point in the field, but made their greatest marks in other areas: people like Walt Disney, Theodor “Dr. Seuss” Geisel and Hugh Hefner (whose inclusion will likely be the biggest surprise to more readers; and, make no mistake, the book is made as much for the casual reader as the expert, armchair or otherwise). Others you might not think of as cartoonists at all, like Edward Gorey or Al Hirschfeld.

And changing the world — the whole world?! — is a pretty bold claim, certainly bolder than changing, say, a genre, or a medium or an industry. Certainly Disney and Osamu Tezuka qualify, as do Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster, who introduced the superhero as we know it, and Jack Kirby, who reimagined the superhero, made countless contributions to the form and who created or co-created characters and concepts that today make billions of dollars.

But what about Harvey Kurtzman, Robert Crumb and the aforementioned Hirschfeld? Are their influences and innovations on equal footing?

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Tintin drawings sell for $2.9 million, setting new world record

tintin-auction

An original page of Tintin drawings signed by Hergé sold at auction Saturday in Paris for nearly $2.9 million, setting a new world record for comic art.

Dating to 1937, the double-page spread featuring the boy reporter, Snowy and other characters (above) was created for the inside covers of Tintin books published between 1937 and 1958. According to Agence France-Press, the piece was purchased by an American collector following “15 minutes of furious bidding” at the Artcurial devoted entirely to the Belgian artist and his most famous creation.

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Paolo Rivera’s Herge-inspired wedding invitation is amazing

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Congratulations to Eisner Award-winning artist Paolo Rivera, who was recently married in grand comic-book style. No, not with a costumed villain crashing the ceremony, but rather with comics-themed accents, from the save-the-date cards and invitations to the cake-topper and name cards — all of which Rivera shows off on his blog.

As the artist’s new wife grew up as a fan of Tintin, he went with a Herge-esque style for the invitation illustration, which features guests ranging from Daredevil and Katniss Everdeen to Optimus Prime and (perhaps best of all) Ellen Ripley in the Power Loader. You can see the full image below, and the rest of the items — including Rivera’s sculpted Psylocke and Wolverine cake-topper — on his blog.

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Comics A.M. | Chargers oppose San Diego Convention Center plan

San Diego Convention Center

San Diego Convention Center

Conventions | The San Diego Chargers are opposing the proposed $520 million expansion of the San Diego Convention Center — viewed as crucial to keeping Comic-Con International in the city past 2015 — saying it will interfere with plans for a new football stadium. Instead, the NFL franchise proposes building a second venue a few blocks away, which would be part of a complex that included the stadium but would not be contiguous with the existing convention center. [Los Angeles Times]

Conventions | Meanwhile, on the other coast, New York Comic Con is about to begin, and Luke Villapaz has seven tips for surviving the con. One additional point, though: While it’s nice that NYCC has its own mobile app, chances of its actually working inside the Javits Center, which is notorious for its many cell phone dead zones, are slim. [International Business Times]

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Comics A.M. | Moulinsart launches Tintin app; Jesse Santos dies

The Adventures of Tintin

The Adventures of Tintin

Digital comics | Moulinsart, the company that holds the rights to Herge’s works, has released the complete Tintin comics in digital form. The iOS app is free, and it looks like the comics are $5.99 each, which is pretty reasonable. The catch is that they are all in the original French; it doesn’t appear as if translations are available yet. [Idboox]

Passings | Filipino komiks creator Jesse Santos died April 27 at the age of 83. Santos began his career in 1946 as an artist for the first serialized comic in the Philippines, Halakhak, and moved to the U.S. in the 1960s. He drew the sword-and-sorcery character Dragar the Invincible and took over from Dan Spiegle as artist for The Occult Files of Doctor Spektor. [Komikero Dot Com]

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Comics A.M. | Tokyo’s Comiket to lose $117,900 due to threat letter

Kuroko’s Basketball

Conventions | Japan’s Comic Market (aka Comiket), the world’s largest convention dedicated to self-published comics, stands to lose about $117,900 because of a decision to bar artist groups (“circles”) dedicated to the manga Kuroko’s Basketball following a threat letter. Organizers are refunding entrance fees to about 900 Kuroko’s Basketball circles that registered for the Dec. 29-31 event, and must help pay for increased security in cooperation with local police and the Tokyo Big Sight complex. Since October, letters containing powdered and liquid substances have been sent to more than 20 locations linked to Kuroko’s Basketball creator Tadatoshi Fujimaki. At least six Kuroko’s Basketball doujinshi events have been canceled. [Anime News Network]

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