Herge Archives - Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

‘Tintin’ cover sells for near-record $2.8 million at auction

tintin-shooting star-colorThe original cover for the 1942 Tintin book The Shooting Star sold at auction for more than $2.8 million, just shy of the record price paid last year for a piece of Hergé’s art.

Comic book dealers Petits Papiers-Huberty-Breyne told Agence France-Presse the yellowing art was purchased by a European investor who “is neither Belgian nor French.” No other details about the buyer’s identity were disclosed.

The Shooting Star cover is one of just five that remains in the hands of private collectors. Most of  Hergé’s work is held by Moulinsart, the Brussels-based organization established in 1987 by the cartoonist’s widow Fanny Rodwell

The 10th volume of The Adventures of Tintin, The Shooting Star follows Tintin, his faithful dog Snowy and his friend Captain Haddock as they take part in a scientific expedition to the Arctic Ocean to find a meteorite before it’s uncovered by a rival team.

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Original ‘Tintin’ cover could fetch as much as $2.9 million

tintin-shooting star-colorHergé’s original cover art for the 1942 Tintin book The Shooting Star is expected to sell for as much as $2.9 million when it goes up for auction at the Brussels Antiques and Fine Arts Fair, which kicks off Saturday in Belgium.

It’s a hefty sum that could rival the record price paid in May for an original double-page spread created by the Belgian artist for the inside covers of Tintin books published between 1937 and 1958. Another drawing of Tintin, created by Hergé in 1939 for the cover of the weekly magazine Le Petit Vingtième, sold last month for $670,000.

Agence France-Presse notes that the Shooting Star cover was one of just five that remains in the hands of private collectors. Most of  Hergé’s work is held by Moulinsart (aka the Hergé Foundation), the Brussels-based organization establshed in 1987 by the cartoonist’s widow Fanny Rodwell. The foundation oversees the Hergé estate as well as the Hergé Museum outside Brussels.

The 10th volume of The Adventures of Tintin, The Shooting Star follows Tintin, his faithful dog Snowy and his friend Captain Haddock as they take part in a scientific expedition to the Arctic Ocean to find a meteorite before it’s uncovered by a rival team.

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10 comic characters drawn in the style of 10 artists

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The comics medium allows for diverse interpretations of characters, both narratively and visually. Artist Jaakko Seppälä has taken 10 of the most iconic comic characters — from Asterix to Batman to Lucy van Pelt — drawn in the style of 10 famous artists (including their respective creators or most popular illustrators).

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High marks for Monte Beauchamp’s ‘Masterful Marks’

masterful marksBlab founder and editor Monte Beauchamp’s latest book, Masterful Marks: Cartoonists Who Changed the World, bears a subtitle that begs to be parsed, almost as much as it begs to be read.

He’s gathered a Murderers’ Row of great contributors and collaborators to tell the life’s stories of 16 cartoonists, in the most obvious format to do so — comics, of course.

But what, exactly, constitutes a cartoonist? Some of those included might have worked at one point in the field, but made their greatest marks in other areas: people like Walt Disney, Theodor “Dr. Seuss” Geisel and Hugh Hefner (whose inclusion will likely be the biggest surprise to more readers; and, make no mistake, the book is made as much for the casual reader as the expert, armchair or otherwise). Others you might not think of as cartoonists at all, like Edward Gorey or Al Hirschfeld.

And changing the world — the whole world?! — is a pretty bold claim, certainly bolder than changing, say, a genre, or a medium or an industry. Certainly Disney and Osamu Tezuka qualify, as do Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster, who introduced the superhero as we know it, and Jack Kirby, who reimagined the superhero, made countless contributions to the form and who created or co-created characters and concepts that today make billions of dollars.

But what about Harvey Kurtzman, Robert Crumb and the aforementioned Hirschfeld? Are their influences and innovations on equal footing?

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Tintin drawings sell for $2.9 million, setting new world record

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An original page of Tintin drawings signed by Hergé sold at auction Saturday in Paris for nearly $2.9 million, setting a new world record for comic art.

Dating to 1937, the double-page spread featuring the boy reporter, Snowy and other characters (above) was created for the inside covers of Tintin books published between 1937 and 1958. According to Agence France-Press, the piece was purchased by an American collector following “15 minutes of furious bidding” at the Artcurial devoted entirely to the Belgian artist and his most famous creation.

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Paolo Rivera’s Herge-inspired wedding invitation is amazing

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Congratulations to Eisner Award-winning artist Paolo Rivera, who was recently married in grand comic-book style. No, not with a costumed villain crashing the ceremony, but rather with comics-themed accents, from the save-the-date cards and invitations to the cake-topper and name cards — all of which Rivera shows off on his blog.

As the artist’s new wife grew up as a fan of Tintin, he went with a Herge-esque style for the invitation illustration, which features guests ranging from Daredevil and Katniss Everdeen to Optimus Prime and (perhaps best of all) Ellen Ripley in the Power Loader. You can see the full image below, and the rest of the items — including Rivera’s sculpted Psylocke and Wolverine cake-topper — on his blog.

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Comics A.M. | Chargers oppose San Diego Convention Center plan

San Diego Convention Center

San Diego Convention Center

Conventions | The San Diego Chargers are opposing the proposed $520 million expansion of the San Diego Convention Center — viewed as crucial to keeping Comic-Con International in the city past 2015 — saying it will interfere with plans for a new football stadium. Instead, the NFL franchise proposes building a second venue a few blocks away, which would be part of a complex that included the stadium but would not be contiguous with the existing convention center. [Los Angeles Times]

Conventions | Meanwhile, on the other coast, New York Comic Con is about to begin, and Luke Villapaz has seven tips for surviving the con. One additional point, though: While it’s nice that NYCC has its own mobile app, chances of its actually working inside the Javits Center, which is notorious for its many cell phone dead zones, are slim. [International Business Times]

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Comics A.M. | Moulinsart launches Tintin app; Jesse Santos dies

The Adventures of Tintin

The Adventures of Tintin

Digital comics | Moulinsart, the company that holds the rights to Herge’s works, has released the complete Tintin comics in digital form. The iOS app is free, and it looks like the comics are $5.99 each, which is pretty reasonable. The catch is that they are all in the original French; it doesn’t appear as if translations are available yet. [Idboox]

Passings | Filipino komiks creator Jesse Santos died April 27 at the age of 83. Santos began his career in 1946 as an artist for the first serialized comic in the Philippines, Halakhak, and moved to the U.S. in the 1960s. He drew the sword-and-sorcery character Dragar the Invincible and took over from Dan Spiegle as artist for The Occult Files of Doctor Spektor. [Komikero Dot Com]

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Comics A.M. | Tokyo’s Comiket to lose $117,900 due to threat letter

Kuroko’s Basketball

Conventions | Japan’s Comic Market (aka Comiket), the world’s largest convention dedicated to self-published comics, stands to lose about $117,900 because of a decision to bar artist groups (“circles”) dedicated to the manga Kuroko’s Basketball following a threat letter. Organizers are refunding entrance fees to about 900 Kuroko’s Basketball circles that registered for the Dec. 29-31 event, and must help pay for increased security in cooperation with local police and the Tokyo Big Sight complex. Since October, letters containing powdered and liquid substances have been sent to more than 20 locations linked to Kuroko’s Basketball creator Tadatoshi Fujimaki. At least six Kuroko’s Basketball doujinshi events have been canceled. [Anime News Network]

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Comics A.M. | Scottish city to create Bash Street to honor Beano strip

Bash Street Kids

Comics | The Dundee, Scotland, city council has approved a proposal by publisher DC Thomson to name a street in the city’s west end to honor the Bash Street Kids, stars of the long-running comic strip in The Beano. Dundee already has statues honoring comic characters Desperate Dan and Minnie the Minx. [BBC News]

Comics | Laura Sneddon continues the New Statesmen’s week-long series on comics with a look at children’s comics in the U.K., including the digital relaunch of The Dandy, the continuing popularity of The Beano (which sells a respectable 30,000 copies per week) and the new kid on the block, The Phoenix. [New Statesman]

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Diamond Comic Distributors signs Tintin deal

Moulsinart S.A., the company established to promote and protect the works of Hergé, has signed a deal for Diamond Comic Distributors to exclusively distribute The Adventures of Tintin merchandise in specialty stores in North America and the Philippines.

The announcement is characterized as “a key step in Moulinsart’s first ongoing and comprehensive program of Tintin collectibles, comics, and limited availability products in North America.” A primary goal of the initiative is to expand the sales and brand awareness of Tintin in North America.

Hergé’s beloved series, which chronicles the adventures of a globe-trotting young Belgian reporter and his faithful dog Snowy, has been been translated into more than 50 languages and sold more than 200 million copies worldwide. Although the books have experienced limited popularity in the United States, Steven Spielberg’s 2011 motion-capture film adaptation raised awareness of the character.

Tintin merchandise has been listed in Diamond’s Previews catalog since June, and will be spotlighted in dedicated pages.

“Although many U.S. fans became aware of Tintin with the Steven Spielberg/Peter Jackson film released in 2011, the international Adventures of Tintin have been known worldwide for many years,” John Parker, Diamond’s vice president of business development, said in a statement. “We at Diamond are ecstatic to be involved in the expanded introduction of Tintin’s stories and awesome collectible and novelty products to the thousands of stores in our network.”

News of the Moulsinart deal comes just a week after Diamond announced it had inked a deal with Tezuka Productions to distribute Osamu Tezuka comics, toys and other products outside of Japan.

Comics A.M. | Tintin in the Congo isn’t racist, Belgian court rules

From "Tintin in the Congo"

Legal | A Belgian court of appeals has ruled that Tintin in the Congo is not racist and stated that the book has “gentle and candid humour.” The ruling came in a case brought in 2007 by Bienvenu Mbutu Mondondo, an immigrant from the Congo, and the Belgian Council of Black Associations. Although Herge himself expressed regret in later life for the book, which includes numerous depictions of black characters as stupid and inferior, the court did not support the plaintiffs’ claim that “The negative stereotypes portrayed in this book are still read by a significant number of children. They have an impact on their behaviour.” [Sky News]

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Fantagraphics to publish Herge

French cover for 'Peppy and Virginny'

In a comment thread on The Comics Journal website, Fantagraphics Co-Publisher Kim Thompson revealed the company will publish an early work by Tintin creator Herge (a.k.a. Georges Remi) titled Peppy and Virginny in Lapinoland.

Also known as Popol Out West, and called Popol et Virginie au pays de Lapinos in French, the book follows the adventures of “a couple of haberdashers who journeyed to the Wild West in search of new clientele, accompanied by their trusty horse Bluebell — where they ran into savage Indian tribes, evil bandits, and much more,” according to the PR details. As far as I can tell, it’s Herge’s only long-form funny animal series, with the lead characters drawn as bears and the Native Americans depicted as rabbits with feathers for ears.

Originally published in 1934, the book is one of several lesser-known and short-lived series that Herge did before giving his artistic life over to Tintin completely (and includes the Quick and Flupke and Jo, Zette and Jocko series).

The 56-page book, which costs $16.99, will be in stores July 2013. It will be part of Fantagraphics ongoing all-ages Eurocomics line, which includes such titles as The Littlest Pirate King and Murder By High Tide.

In other, unrelated Herge news, the comment thread also calls attention to this book, yet to find a publisher, which apparently suggests that Herge and Tchang, the model for the Chang character in The Blue Lotus, had an affair. Bleeding Cool has not-at-all sexy previews of the book here.

Comics A.M. | IDW Limited launches; Swedish libraries grapple with Tintin

IDW Limited

Publishing | IDW Publishing CEO Ted Adams discusses the company’s new IDW Limited program, which will produce small print runs of deluxe editions that will be marketed direct to the consumer. How small? The print run for the Blue Label edition of Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Vol. 1 Deluxe Limited Edition will be 10 copies. “The only fair thing to do is to give the fans direct access on a first come first served basis,” he said. “We’re putting an incredible emphasis on quality, and that directly affects the quantity of books IDW Limited can produce. We’re designing new covers, building custom cases and paying the artists to do hand drawn sketch work to go with these books. The reality is that that’s all very expensive and unfortunately it makes it difficult for us to offer this line at the deep discount needed for traditional retail distribution.” [ICv2]

Libraries | Following the firestorm sparked last month when a youth library in Stockholm briefly removed Tintin comics because of their racial caricatures of Africans and Arabs, a survey finds that 10 percent of Swedish libraries have removed or restricted Herge’s books due to “racist content.” [The Local]

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Tintin in the Congo: It’s complicated

A youth library in Stockholm pulled Tintin comics from its shelves on the grounds that the racial caricatures of Africans and Arabs are not suitable for children before quickly backpedaling after the removal triggered a media firestorm in Sweden.

“I wanted to highlight an opinion piece about issues of discrimination, but realize now that it’s wrong to ban books,” explained Behrang Miri, the Kulturhuset library’s youth director.

Although the articles don’t specify which Tintin books were pulled, it’s safe to say the primary culprit was Tintin in the Congo, published in 1930, in which the Belgian creator Herge depicted Africans in crudely stereotyped ways. The book has come under heavy criticism in the United States and in Europe, and several attempts have been made, some successful, to remove it from libraries and bookstores (in February, a Belgian court rejected a five-year-old bid to ban the book).

So it’s something of a surprise to learn that Tintin is actually quite popular in the Congo, with locally made statues of the characters and mockups of the covers selling briskly to European tourists. While the director of the national museum objects to the proliferation of Tintinabilia, preferring to focus on the rich native heritage of the country, artisan Auguy Kakese, who makes and sells Tintin figures for a living is more sanguine:

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