HeroesCon Archives - Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

HeroesCon ’14 | Day 3 photos

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In the final day of HeroesCon, I was fortunate enough to meet an equal mix of industry legends and new (to me) creators. Also, if you look over the previous photo posts (Day 1, More Day 1, Day 2), you see a trend of some folks giving me the thumbs up. Had I requested the pose, the trend would not be worth noting. But I didn’t; some people just opted to go for the whimsical look, and I love it. My thanks to every creator over the three days who took a moment to pose for a photo (in some cases more than a few times).

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Winners of 2014 Inkwell Awards announced

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The winners of the seventh annual Inkwell Awards, which recognize creative achievement in the field of inking in American comics, were announced over the weekend at HeroesCon in Charlotte, North Carolina.

Nominees were selected by a nominating committee and then presented for online voting. Another committee chose two recipients of the annual Joe Sinnott Hall of Fame Award. The winners are:

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HeroesCon ’14 | Day 2 photos

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Saturday, aka Day 2, of HeroesCon was much busier for creators, so I didn’t always get the opportunity to chat with them that I did on the first day of the Charlotte, North Carolina, convention. In those instances, in place of project updates I provide links to the creators and/or their related works.

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Comics A.M. | Wizard World Philadelphia’s $5.9M economic impact

Wizard World Philadelphia Comic Con

Wizard World Philadelphia Comic Con

Conventions | While the South Jersey Times and Philadelphia Inquirer focus on the fans who turned out over the weekend for the 14th annual Wizard World Philadelphia Comic Con, Philadelphia Business Journal zeroes in on its economic impact: an estimated $5.9 million, which seems like a lot, until you compare it to the expected $16.2 million impact of the 6,000-person American Industrial Hygiene Association conference. [Philadelphia Business Journal]

Conventions | First-timer Michael Smith reports on the Amazing Las Vegas Comic Con. [Liberty Voice]

Creators | John Romita Jr. talks about moving from Marvel to DC Comics to draw Superman and about comics being his family business; and his father, John Romita Sr., chimes in as well. [The New York Times]

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What makes HeroesCon so awesome

Skottie!

Skottie!

HeroesCon is my San Diego.

It is my all-time favorite con. Hands down. So the fact my day job kept me out of the country and away from the con for both 2012 and 2013 left me extremely disappointed. The above photo captures what I love about the atmosphere of the con. Creator Skottie Young has never met me. He was in the middle of signing for folks when I asked for a quick photo. The above was his reaction.

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HeroesCon ’14 | More day 1 photos

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As I noted in the intro to the first round of HeroesCon 2014 Day 1 photos, I tried to cover a lot of ground in taking photographs. It turns out I got around to so many people on the first day that I needed to split the photos into two posts. Now on with part II!

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HeroesCon ’14 | Day 1 photos

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On the first day of HeroesCon 2014, the 32nd edition of the Charlotte, North Carolina, comics convention founded and still run by Shelton Drum, I tried to cover a lot of ground in taking photographs. When possible I found out about the current or upcoming projects in the pipeline for the creators photographed.

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HeroesCon releases harassment policy

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Just days before HeroesCon kicks off in Charlotte, North Carolina, organizers have released a code of conduct addressing harassment and cautioning exhibitors about images and materials that exceed the event’s PG-13 standards.

Signed by founder Shelton Drum, the policy extends beyond the exhibition floor to after-hours events at host hotels, and spells out that, “HeroesCon is dedicated to providing a fun, safe and harassment-free convention experience for everyone regardless of gender, sexual orientation, disability, physical appearance, body size, race, age or religion.”

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‘Tellos’ tribute sketchbook to benefit Wieringo scholarship fund

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Nearly seven years after the sudden passing of Mike Wieringo, a selection of tribute art has been collected by Todd Dezago and Craig Rousseau in the Mike Wieringo Tellos Tribute Sketchbook, available this weekend at HeroesCon.

The announcement came today from Wieringo’s Tellos collaborator Dezago, who said proceeds will benefit the Mike Wieringo Scholarship fund at the Savannah College of Art & Design, established in 2008. The sketchbook will be available at the table of Matt and Suzanne Wieringo.

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Shelton Drum’s original art collection goes on display

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Shelton Drum, owner of the Charlotte, North Carolina, comics store Heroes Aren’t Hard to Find and founder of HeroesCon, has been collecting original art for years from such creators as Jack Kirby, Steve Ditko, Wally Wood, John Romita and Frank Miller — but that’s only for starters. And beginning Friday, the public will be able to say that art on display for the first time in an exhibit at the William King Museum in Abingdon, Virginia.

Called “Heroes Aren’t Hard to Find: the Comic Art Collection of Shelton Drum,” the exhibit features private commissions and original pages spanning from the 1950s to today; there’s also original HeroesCon promotional artwork from the likes of Mike Mignola, Darwyn Cooke and James Jean.

“I’m apprehensive, but excited,” Drum said. “I’m honored and pleased that I can share my collection but it wasn’t something that I thought was going to happen anytime soon.”

Staged with the help of the Out of Step Arts Collective, the exhibit continues through June 29. An opening reception is scheduled for Feb. 6.

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See Rich Barrett’s HeroesCon presentation on design in comics

design-slideshow011-640x480Design is integral to comics. In its basic form, it’s used by artists to tell story through panel composition and transitions, but in broader terms it’s the logos, trade dress and visual platform by which comics are shown to the public.

Last month at HeroesCon in Charlotte, North Carolina, cartoonist/designer Rich Barrett moderated a panel that looked at the approach and examples of graphic design in use in the medium. With a panel that included cartoonist/designers like Jim Rugg, Matt Kindt and Robert Wilson IV, publisher/designer Chris Pitzer of AdHouse Books and non-comics desginer Matt Stevens, Barrett shepherded the room through slideshow series of impressive design, from page layouts to book covers to book packaging.

The indie-centric design group talked about the use of design by mainstream creators like Jonathan Hickman, Chris Ware and Chester Brown, and its changing role of design as the methods by which comics being sold have changed over the past 20 years.

Although no recording of the panel exists (as of yet), Barrett has shared his slideshow presentation here:

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Ming Doyle’s convention sketches show an artist ready for super-stardom

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I first came across Ming Doyle’s work when she illustrated a new Michael Moorcock Elric short story in Weird Tales #349, the series’ 85th birthday issue. I’m something of a Moorcock nut, and prone to strong opinions about his artistic collaborators, but Doyle’s work more than passed muster: Here was an artist whose progress I was going to have to keep a close eye on.

Since then, Doyle’s career trajectory has been consistently upward, from the Star Trek-loving webcomic Boldly Gone with Kevin Church, to her current work on the Image comic Mara with Brian Wood. Every time some editor at DC Comics or Marvel claims he isn’t employing female creators because there just aren’t any out there fit for purpose, she’s always one of the first names that pops into my head as I mentally compose a list as long as your arm of women one big gig away from comics super-stardom.

Anyway, it’s convention season, that happy time when my favorite artists post lots of lovely sketches on their blogs, Instagram timelines, Facebook and the like — y’know, that newfangled social media the kids are all talking about. The collective Doyle belongs to, Out of Step Arts, has posted several sketches done at last weeks HeroesCon, some of which can also be seen at her own site, along with more May’s Phoenix Comicon. There’s a selection of my favorites after the break, including probably the most smouldering-est rendering of Bones McCoy ever.

(Note: The headline has been changed to better reflect the intention of this post, which is to celebrate Ming Doyle’s artwork. We apologize if our meaning wasn’t clear.)

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Comics A.M. | ‘Walking Dead’ slips, manga rises in May

Naruto, Vol. 61

Naruto, Vol. 61

Retailing | Naruto topped the May BookScan chart of graphic novels sold in bookstores, followed by two volumes of The Walking Dead, the latest volume of Sailor Moon, and Yen Press’ latest Twilight adaptation New Moon. Just three volumes total of The Walking Dead made the Top 20 (down from eight last month), and as usual, DC and Marvel got clobbered: DC had three titles on the list (two volumes of Court of Owls and Watchmen) while Marvel had one (Hawkeye), and none was above No. 15. Or to put it another way: Vol. 14 of Dance in the Vampire Bund, a high-numbered volume in a fairly niche manga series, placed higher than every Big Two book on BookScan last month. [ICv2]

Creators | With the second issue of their digital-only comic The Private Eye recently released, writer Brian K. Vaughan and artist Marcos Martin talk about their story, why they decided to do it digitally, and what the response has been so far. [The Verge]

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Comics A.M. | HeroesCon doubles exhibition space

HeroesCon

HeroesCon

Conventions | HeroesCon, which begins Friday in Charlotte, North Carolina, will double in size this year, with the exhibit area increasing from 100,000 to 200,000 square feet. “There’s a whole lot more of everything,” says founder Shelton Drum. Including people? Last year’s convention drew in 17,000 attendees, and Drum thinks this year’s event will attract more newcomers curious about the source material of their favorite movies. [Winston-Salem Journal]

Creators | Peter Bebergal talks with Alan Moore about Jerusalem, magic, comics, and the tendency to conflate gods with superheroes: “It is contrived, because they’re not at all the same. Superheroes are the copyrighted property of big corporations. They are purely commercial entities; they are purely about making a buck. That’s not to say that there haven’t been some wonderful creations in the course of the history of the superhero comic, but to compare them with gods is fairly pointless. Yes, you can make obvious comparisons by saying the golden-age Flash looks a bit like Hermes, as he’s got wings on his helmet, or the golden-age Hawkman looks a bit like Horus because he’s got a hawk head. But this is just to say that comics creators through the decades have taken their inspiration where they can find it. Before I was interested in magic as a viable way of life, I was certainly aware of the occult, and wouldn’t be above taking names or concepts or ideas from the occult.” [The Believer]

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What’s Frank Cho’s secret Marvel project?

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Before heading off to Charlotte, North Carolina, for this weekend’s HeroesCon, Frank Cho offers a tantalizing clue to his secret follow-up to Marvel’s Savage Wolverine in the form of a cover detail that clearly shows Emma Frost (in full below), along with what may be Angel in his classic X-Men costume. Those other elements are anybody’s guess.

“Now, people have asked me what’s coming up after my Savage Wolverine run,” Cho writes. “Well, gang, Marvel will announce it soon. In fact, I’ve just received the full script this week and just started drawing it. It’s a doozy.”

This weekend he’ll be at Artists Alley table AA-1503, where maybe you can pry a few more clues from him.

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