Homer Marciniak Archives | Robot 6 | The Comics Culture Blog

Comics A.M. | Iconic Neal Adams cover art sells for $442,150

green-lantern-green-arrow-s

Auctions | Rob Salkowitz looks at the recent sale at auction of Neal Adams’ original cover art for Green Lantern/Green Arrow #76 for an impressive, although not record-setting, $442,150. He notes that the significance of the issue, and the endorsement of the sale by Adams, likely had an effect on the price. In 1970, most publishers didn’t routinely return original art to artist, and Adams has been critical of the sale of artwork that was simply taken, and sometimes given away, by staffers or editors. In this case, however, he announced through the auction house that “since the proprietor of the cover has agreed to equitably share the income of the auction with me and my family, I hereby validate sale and ownership of this piece and I will, in fact, supply a Certificate of Authenticity to the highest bidder of the auction, and the ownership of this cover will never be questioned by me.” A portion of the proceeds was also donated to The Hero Initiative. [ICv2]

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Comics A.M. | ‘Saga,’ ‘Persepolis’ & ‘Drama’ among most challenged books

Saga Book One

Saga Book One

Graphic novels | This week is Banned Books Week, when the American Library Association releases its list of the 10 most challenged books of the previous year. This year’s list includes three graphic novels: Persepolis, Saga and Drama. Michael Cavna discusses graphic novel with Charles Brownstein, executive director of the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund, who points out that Drama, which was challenged for being “sexually explicit,” is just the opposite: “In the incidents I’ve personally been involved in, and many others, the book’s light touch is precisely what infuriates those who want to take it off the shelves — there’s a sense that’s been communicated to me and others that kids shouldn’t be reading that being gay is a normal part of the human experience.” [Comic Riffs]

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Ringleader pleads guilty in robbery that led to comic collector’s death

Rico J. Vendetti

Rico J. Vendetti

A Rochester, New York, businessman admitted Friday he orchestrated a 2010 home invasion that resulted in the death of a 77-year-old comic book collector.

Although Rico J. Vendetti faced federal murder charges, The Buffalo News reports he pleaded guilty to racketeering for planning the robbery of the $30,000 comic book collection of retired custodian Homer Marciniak, and hiring seven people to pull it off.

Prosecutors contend that Vendetti had long operated an eBay scam in which he hired “professional boosters” to steal $665,000 in merchandise from stores in the region and then sell it to him for 25 cents on the dollar. He in turn would list the items on Craiglist and eBay, earning an estimated $42,000 a month.

Vendetti allegedly had a similar scheme in mind when he learned about the classic comic collection of Marciniak, a well-liked man who lived alone in the village of Medina, New York. Authorities say the hired criminals cut the phone line to Marciniak’s house on July 5, 2010, only to be confronted by him once they were inside. The burglars beat the homeowner and knocked him to the floor, and made off with the comics, safes, cash, coins and guns.

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Trial set for December in death of elderly comic collector

Rico J. Vendetti

Rico J. Vendetti

A Rochester, New York, businessman will stand trial for murder in December in the 2010 death of an elderly comic book collector.

According to the Batavia, New York, Daily News, the trial of Rico J. Vendetti is scheduled for Dec. 5 in U.S. District Court in Buffalo. Dates still haven’t been set for his four co-defendants.

Vendetti is accused of hiring seven people to steal the valuable comics collection of 77-year-old Homer Marciniak of Medina, New York. According to police and prosecutors, when Marciniak awoke during the July 5, 2010, burglary, he was beaten and knocked to the floor. They burglars fled with the comics, safes, cash, coins and guns.

Although Marciniak suffered only cuts and bruises from the attack, and was able to give a statement to police, he died hours later from a heart attack.

Vendetti, who owned a collectibles store, was arrested along with seven others within a few months. The U.S. Attorney stepped in to file murder charges against Vendetti and four of his co-defendants, arguing that the burglary led to Marciniak’s death.

He’s also accused of racketeering and witness tampering.


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