Howard Porter Archives - Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

UFC debuts UFC 181 poster by Howard Porter and Alex Sinclair

dc-ufc-cropped

To help promote its UFC 181 pay-per-view event, the UFC turned to DC Comics for a comic book-style poster, created by Howard Porter and Alex Sinclair.

The result, which showcases the card’s two title fights — Robbie Lawler vs. Johny Hendricks and Anthony Pettis vs. Gilbert Melendez — was unveiled Friday during a press conference.

A lifelong fan of mixed martial arts, the former JLA and Flash artist said he was thrilled when asked by DC to illustrate the poster.

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Grumpy Old Fan | ‘JL 3000′: Reply hazy, ask again later

They should really just relax

They should really just relax

For those who have followed DC’s promotion of Justice League 3000, this week’s inaugural issue must arrive with something of an asterisk. Announced in June as the latest reunion of Justice League International’s Keith Giffen (plot and breakdowns), J.M. DeMatteis (script) and Kevin Maguire (pencils), within two months the series became an unflattering example of creative-team chaos. In August, artist Howard Porter replaced Maguire, thereby postponing the series’ October debut. According to Maguire, DC apparently wanted something more dark and gritty, which doesn’t quite fit the style we now know as “bwah-ha-ha” — but by the same token, one wonders (as did Maguire) what DC thought it would get from the trio’s collaboration.

Still, to echo Donald Rumsfeld (and, 15 years earlier and more to the point, my entertainment-journalism professor), you review the comic you have, not the comic you wish you had. The first issue of Justice League 3000 reads like an artifact from the mid-1990s, when DC cranked out dystopian-future Elseworld stories fairly regularly; and Porter’s art is emblematic of the issue’s gritty, scratchy tone. This isn’t JLI. It’s not of a piece with Giffen and DeMatteis’ work writing Booster Gold, or even the current Larfleeze. It’s more like the short-lived, Giffen-written Threshold, crossed with an original-variety Marvel 2099 title.

In short, this first issue isn’t bad, just rather frustrating. I suppose the series has potential, and its creative team probably deserves a couple of issues to advance the plot. Regardless, JL3K #1 starts off negative and teases even more. It doesn’t give readers much optimism, outside of a vague sense that at some point, things can only get better.

SPOILERS FOLLOW, of course.

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Crisis on Earth-3D!: Villains Month, Week Two

villains

DC Comics kicked off its Villains Month last week, as the evil opposites of the Justice League invaded the DC Universe, seemingly disposing of all the heroes and taking over the world.

Likewise, the villains have been taking over DC’s New 52 line of comic books, with the MIA heroes finding the covers of their books occupied by bad guys. Those are, of course, the collectible and somewhat-controversial (among retailers) 3D lenticular covers.

But as the case with books, we shouldn’t judge a comic by its cover, so let’s continue reviewing our way through the contents of the Villains Month issues. As with last week’s batch, I’m rating each book on a 10-point scale of how evil it is, with “Not Very Good” being the worst and “Absolute Evil” the best, and noting its connectivity to the Forever Evil crossover event that sparked the promotion in the first place.

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Too many creators, too little lead time spoil DC’s ‘He-Man’ reboot

hemanHave you ever heard the expression, “If a thing is worth doing, it’s worth doing well?” Have you heard about  DC Comics’ He-Man and the Masters of the Universe, whose first six-issue miniseries was just collected? Have any of the people involved with the creation of those comics heard of that expression? Because from the results, it sure doesn’t seem to be the case.

The comics are poorly made — among the worst I’ve seen produced by an industry-leading publisher — but they’re bad in a very particular way.

They aren’t unreadable; I made it all the way through He-Man and The Masters of the Universe Vol. 1 without giving up. If pressed, I’m sure I could come up with some worse, more poorly made comics from DC in the recent past, but I might have difficulty thinking of worse comics from creators of such a relatively high caliber as some of those involved with this project, or an example of a series so bewilderingly bad.

Seemingly rushed through production like a term paper written the night before it’s due, many of the comics’ problems appear to originate with there being just too many creators working too fast and with little communication to meet a particular deadline. But,the funny thing is that it’s just a He-Man comic that no one in the comics-reading audience seemed particularly excited about, let alone interested in.

So it’s hard to imagine a  reason DC decided to steam ahead with its creation to meet an arbitrarily chosen deadline before, say, nailing down a single creative team. Put another way, this is a bad comic book, and I can tell you what makes it a bad comic book, but I can’t hazard a guess as to why the people responsible for it made the decisions they did that resulted in it being so bad.

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Eight-year-old Geoff Johns’ He-Man character debuts today on comiXology

As a prelude to this summer’s He-Man and the Masters of the Universe comic book revival, DC Comics and comiXology today kicked off a digital-first He-Man comic series. The first issue, written by Geoff Johns with art by Howard Porter and John Livesay, is available now for 99 cents.

The comic features Sir Laser Lot, a MOTU character that Johns first envisioned when he was eight years old. Sir Laser Lot will debut as an action figure this summer at the San Diego Comic-Con as a part of the line’s 30th anniversary.

“I’ve been a huge fan of He-Man and the Masters of the Universe since I was a kid, so it’s cool to write a story for this new series — not to mention teaming up with Howard Porter and John Livesay, my old Flash partners in crime,” stated Geoff Johns. “And to create an all-new character that will become an action figure – Sir Laser Lot — it’s beyond fun. I’m going to buy like 100 of them.”

The digital series will debut new chapters twice a month on Saturdays. The second chapter, due July 14, is written by Mike Costa with artwork by Jheremy Raapack, and it tells the story of Battle Cat. The third digital chapter, written by Kyle Higgins with artwork by Pop Mhan, is an adventure with the captain of the Eternia guard, Man-At-Arms.

Check out the cover as well as the Sir Laser Lot action figure after the jump.

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What Are You Reading? with Jessica Campbell

Quoi!

Happy Earth Day and welcome to What Are You Reading? Today our guest is Jessica Campbell, design manager for Drawn and Quarterly as well as a painter.

To see what Jessica and the Robot 6 crew have been reading, click below.

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What Are You Reading? with Chris Duffy

Optic Nerve #12

Welcome to What Are You Reading? Our special guest today is Chris Duffy, editor of First Second’s Nursery Rhyme Comics. We spotlighted this anthology project all week here on Robot 6; check out our interviews with Chris as well as contributors Scott C., Aaron Reiner, Richard Sala and Eleanor Davis.

And to see what Chris and the Robot 6 crew have been reading, click below.

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