I ♥ Comics Archives - Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

I ♥ Finder

Editor’s Note: With Valentine’s Day coming up tomorrow, we’ve declared this the week of Robot Love and resurrected I ♥ Comics. In one of our favorite features, various comics creators, bloggers, retailers and fans discuss the things they love about the medium.

Today’s guest contributor is Laura Hudson, a senior editor at Comic Foundry Magazine and contributing editor for Publishers Weekly Comics Week. She also blogs at Myriad Issues.

By Laura Hudson

from Finder

from Finder

A beautiful college student falls in love with two of her professors, both lonely academics and outcasts who happen to be close friends. The book opens on young Vary propositioning one of them – both out of genuine affection and desire for a better grade – only to be rebuffed and passed to the other, who accepts her offer in a way that she never could had imagined.

Did I mention that the latter professor, Dr. Shar, is a giant talking dinosaur whose idea of being pleasured is running at top speed down highways while Vary clings to his back? Or that his less indulgent friend, Dr. Zivancevic, is a blind, exiled misanthrope who walks around on giant mechanical ostrich legs? Or that Vary is majoring in prostitution?

Welcome to Finder.

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Robot Love | I ♥ learning from comics

Agents of Atlas

Agents of Atlas

Editor’s Note: With Valentine’s Day right around the corner, we’ve declared this the week of Robot Love and resurrected I ♥ Comics. In one of our favorite features, various comics creators, bloggers, retailers and fans discuss the things they love about the medium.

Today we welcome our guest Jeff Parker, creator of The Interman, co-creator of Mysterius: The Unfathomable and writer of a lot of Marvel’s comics — Agents of Atlas, Age of the Sentry, X-Men First Class: Finals and Exiles.

by Jeff Parker

These comics we read can make us smart. Or at least, able to kill Seat 28D during the InFlight Trivia Challenge.

Comics have an inordinately facile ability to get information into the reader’s head. A few years ago I was in Washington, D.C. running around looking at monuments and the like, and I took the once-a-week tour of the Federal Reserve building. It’s surprisingly cool, do it when you’re there on a Thursday sometime. At the end of the tour they gave out a COMIC BOOK that attempted to explain how the Fed works. It was badly drawn, weakly colored, and yet- it actually got across to me some understanding of the mysterious process by which the Fed sets interest rates and influences economic growth or tries to thwart inflation. I was impressed that they took the steps to make a comics giveaway, and it made me happy to retrace the steps they must have gone through. As the guide of the day had explained, one of the big hurdles the people in the Federal Reserve have is trying to explain to the public how they do what they do. The job description requires some understanding of economic theory and process to even get to the nuts and bolts. They obviously spent a lot of time trying to figure out what delivery system could get the curious up to speed, and they arrived at a flimsy newsprint comic with no coated stock cover. And I still have it. They also showed a film about the Fed, but the comic still did a better job distilling the information.

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Robot Love | I ♥ discussing comics

Editor’s Note: With Valentine’s Day right around the corner, we’ve declared this the week of Robot Love and resurrected I ♥ Comics. In one of our favorite features, various comics creators, bloggers, retailers and fans discuss the things they love about the medium.

Today’s guest contributor is blogger and critic Tucker Stone, who writes a weekly column for Comixology called “This Ship Is Totally Sinking” and blogs at The Factual Opinion.

by Tucker Stone

Hmmph. I used to think the easiest answer to a question like this—a question that demands a sort of explanation of how far you want to go with your definition of the word love—is just to throw out a pat “I love comics” one and leave it at that. I used to think that, and “used to” can both mean that A) I don’t think that anymore or B) I’ll think it again later. So yeah, what do I love about comics?

I used to take these religion classes in college with this woman who had gotten herself a good bit of the Worldwide Acclaim through being listed as one of the world’s most effective English-speaking preachers. She was, if I remember correctly, the only one on the list who wasn’t a dude, and one of the few Americans. I didn’t take her classes because of that—that’s not the sort of list that would have crossed my Doom Patrol covered desk when I was trying to find a college that would take me away from frying chicken. But I ended up taking her classes, and it was one of the more challenging experiences of my life, that is if you gauge “challenging” by “things that mostly involve thinking and talking” instead of, you know, something that involves heavy lifting or lightning reflexes. Her classes filled up fast—religion majors got first crack, then the regular student body and any empty seats were taken by non-students, most of whom were her former parishioners who showed up since she’d discontinued her regular preaching upon entering the education field. (In other words, they missed her enough to pay to be around her.) I’m sitting there in class one day, and this really nice old lady piped up in the middle of a discussion on the Book of Job, which is what the entire semester focused on, and said that no, she’d never—not once—had a moment in her life where her faith had been tested. Never had a moment of doubt. Never a moment of question. Not one. She was really firm about it, in that nice old lady voice of hers.

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Robot Love | I ♥ the Fellowship of Comics

Editor’s Note: With Valentine’s Day right around the corner, we’ve declared this the week of Robot Love and resurrected I ♥ Comics. In one of our favorite features, various comics creators, bloggers, retailers and fans discuss the things they love about the medium.

Today’s guest contributor is comics retailer James Sime, owner of Isotope Comics in San Francisco.

by James Sime

Hello, I’m James Sime. I sell comic books for a living.

Daredevil #154

Daredevil #154

My life-long love affair with funnybooks started way back in the ’70s with a second-hand issue of Daredevil #154 purchased at my friend Joel Patterson’s yard sale for a nickel. I’ll never forget the way Joel’s eyes sparkled or his sly car-dealer smile as he put it in my hand and said, “You know you want it!” And I will always remember sitting there on a park swing hunched over reading it for the first of thousands of times. I fell head over heels right then and there for Roger McKenzie’s writing and Gene Colan’s amazing art. That one moment of hucksterism has proven to be one of the most important moments in my life. It was then, sitting on that plastic park swing, that I first knew a strange, new, overwhelming passion I had never felt before. I didn’t understand the feeling at the time, but I do now. Baby… James Sime was in love. And I knew I had to get more comic books.

But more importantly, I knew I had to become better friends with Joel Patterson.

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Robot Love | I ♥ Anticipating Comics

The War at Ellsmere

The War at Ellsmere

Editor’s Note: With Valentine’s Day coming up on Saturday, we’ve declared this the week of Robot Love and resurrected I ♥ Comics. In one of our favorite features, various comics creators, bloggers, retailers and fans discuss the things they love about the medium.

Today’s special guest contributor is Faith Erin Hicks, creator of two fun graphic novels published by SLG, The War at Ellsmere and Zombies Calling. She also has a webcomic called Ice on her website, whch she just so happened to update yesterday.

by Faith Erin Hicks

I’m fairly new to comics. This was not my choice. As a kid I was deeply in love with comics, and taught myself to read on Asterix and Tintin, both of which were readily available at my local library. When I was really little I had a comic book Bible, where a very white looking Jesus preached the word to some equally white looking followers. I memorized that Bible, and it wasn’t because I found the stories particularly enamouring: I just liked reading comics.

However, other than Tintin, Asterix and white Jesus Bible comics, little else was available to me. I grew up in a tiny suburban town, and the only comic shop was a dank, terrifying place that I was scared to death of. When I was a teenager I would walk by the store entrance five times before summoning the courage to go in (my occasional purchase: X-Men comics). I didn’t have any friends who read comics, so there was no one around to say “try this,” and hand me a copy of Jeff Smith’s Bone. Which was really what I wanted to read, not Joe Mad X-Men.

Eventually I moved out of that town for university, into a city, and found Bone. It was right at the end of the first amazing black and white run that I discovered a tattered copy of Volume 3 (The Eyes of the Storm) at a local bookstore. I bought it and devoured it, thrilling at the world and artwork of Jeff Smith, although I really had no idea what was going on. Let it be known that Volume 3 is a very bad place to start reading Bone. But it didn’t matter. I’d found an amazing comic that seemed to be just what I was looking for, an entry way into the bizarre universe of comics themselves. There WERE things beyond superheroes, and I wanted to know what those things were. I bought the remaining Bone volumes, read them in order, and collapsed in delight that there were such things as this comic in the world.

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Robot Love Week | I ♥ Second Chances

Atomic Robo and the Shadow From Beyond Time #1

Atomic Robo and the Shadow From Beyond Time #1

Editor’s Note: With Valentine’s Day coming up next Saturday, we’ve declared this the week of Robot Love. And to kick things off, we’ve resurrected one of our favorite features, I ♥ Comics, where we ask comics creators, bloggers, retailers and fans to discuss the things they love about the medium.

Our first guest contributor this week is Scott Wegener, the artist on Atomic Robo, which is written by Brian Clevinger and published by Red 5 Comics. The first issue of the third volume, Atomic Robo and the Shadow From Beyond Time, is in this month’s Previews.

by Scott Wegener

Ask a guy like me why I love comics and the answer is likely to be a verbatim repetition of my answer to the other question people are constantly asking me –“Why do you love oral surgery?” I love comics because they are necessary, because they promote good overall health, and because I really enjoy the way my gums throb after a good issue of All Star What’s-His-Face.

Seriously, it’s much easier for me to come up with an essay about why I hate comics. I don’t know if that’s because there really is a lot wrong with the industry or if it’s just always easier to criticize than it is to praise? I won’t bore you with a list of things that drive me nuts about comics -we’ve already done that on Atomic-Robo.com. It’s enough to say that I expend more time than it’s worth taking a verbal dump on comic book culture.

And yet there came a time just a few short years ago when I took a hard look at my life and decided that I didn’t like where it was going. And when I tried to figure out what it was that I really loved in life, I found the answer on my mental hard drive under >Geek/Adventure/Comic Books. And so I stopped doing what I was doing, and started doing what I’m doing now.

Looking back on it all, I guess I’d always known that I loved comics, but the 1990’s really jaded me. “Oh Christ,” I can here you thinking. “Another jaded Thirty-Something with a ‘boo-hoo 1997 killed comics’ ax to grind.” Well just keep your pants on for about two paragraphs so I can get it off my chest, and then I promise we’ll roll on to the unicorns and rainbows.

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