James Bond Archives - Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

Six by 6 | Six multimedia franchises we’d welcome into comics

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There’s often a thin line between comics and other entertainment media, and we’ve seen a plethora of comic-book adventures translate successfully to television, film and video games. But it’s a two-way street: A number of other-media properties find immense success in comics. But in all of that back-and-forth action, there are six epic worlds of storytelling from other media that could be bestsellers, given the right creators and the right format. With that in mind, we take a look at a group of top-tier movie, video game and television franchises, and imagine what could happen if and when they make a jump to comics.

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Grumpy Old Fan | Sequelizing the New 52

Someday I will run a landscaping company called Kneel Before Sod.

Someday I will run a landscaping company called Kneel Before Sod

Gather ‘round, kiddos, because we begin with another tale of Gen-X adolescence!

From 1977 through 1986, I grew from a snot-nosed third-grade punk into a snot-nosed (I had allergies) high-school senior, accompanied along the way by at least one big-budget sci-fi/fantasy movie milestone.* Specifically, right in the middle of the run were three sequels by which every self-respecting fan swears: The Empire Strikes Back (1980), Superman II (released in the United States in 1981) and Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan (1982). Each built on its predecessor using darker elements and/or more “mature” themes, because each had the sequel’s luxury of an established setting.

For Young Tom, though, the cumulative effect of these three movies was mind-expanding, if not mind-blowing. I’m not talking about Empire’s Big Reveal (echoed coincidentally in Khan) or the unsettling sight of a powerless Clark Kent. Instead, each catapulted the fevered suppositions of a junior-high imagination to higher levels of awareness. I went into the theater each time wondering will this be as good? and came out giddy at how much better each one was.

So what’s this have to do with comics? Read on …

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An Australian Man Cave to be proud of

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Hello and welcome to Shelf Porn, where fans invite us into their homes to take a look at their collections. Today Jamie from Australia shares his “man cave,” which features action figures, comics, DVDs, more action figures and much more.

If you’d like to share your collection, you can find details on how to do so here.

And now let’s hear from Jamie …

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Talking Comics with Tim | Jim Gibbons on Brain Boy

Brain Boy Archives

On general principle, I love any project with an alliterative name like Brain Boy. And even though JK Parkin just interviewed Dark Horse Assistant Editor Jim Gibbons, when I found out he had the scoop on the Brain Boy Archives that Dark Horse is set to release this Wednesday, November 16, I pestered Gibbons for a brief email interview. The 1962/1963 six-issue series serves as the only comic written by prose novelist Herb Castle. And while Castle developed the origin with legendary artist Gil Kane, after that first appearance, the actual series was drawn by then-newcomer Frank Springer. Inspired by the Cold War landscape of the early 1960s , the short-lived series proved a great springboard for discussion with Gibbons.

Tim O’Shea: How did the idea first come about to develop a Brain Boy archive?

Jim Gibbons: This was all Dark Horse Comics’ head honcho Mike Richardson’s idea. That guy knows his old comics like nobody’s business and we—as a company—wouldn’t have as extensive or as impressive an archival collection series without the passion Big Mike brings to the table for a lot of these projects. As a relatively young guy, I’d never heard for Brain Boy—and may not have had I not been assigned to work on this project with editor extraordinaire Philip Simon—but man, I enjoyed every wacky turn of this short-lived comic series.

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No, Mr. Hiti! I expect you to paint!

Sam Hiti posted this awesome commission he painted for a friend’s 33rd birthday. Hit the link to see not only the uncropped version at various stages, but also a couple of process drawings that reveal how he got to the final product.


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