Jamie McKelvie Archives - Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

Jamie McKelvie shows how he’d redesign Iron Man

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Jamie McKelvie may be spending his days working on his new creator-owned series The Wicked + The Divine, but that doesn’t mean he’s not still thinking about superheroes from time to time. The artist, who had a successful run at Marvel on Young Avengers, The Defenders and X-Men: Season One, has unveiled an Iron Man redesign he came up with the other night, just for fun.

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Gillen and McKelvie get ‘Wicked’ with Zdarsky alternate cover

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If you’re a fan of both Sex Criminals and The Wicked + The Divine, you’re in luck: USA Today has unveiled Chip Zdarsky’s alternate cover for the second issue of the new Image Comics series  … featuring creators Kieron Gillen and Jamie McKelvie.

Debuting this week to positive reviews, The Wicked + The Divine centers on 12 gods who are reborn every 90 years as the ultimate pop stars.

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Comics A.M. | Taking a stand against harassment at cons

Geeks for CONsen

Geeks for CONsen

Conventions | Samantha Melamed looks at the problem of harassment at comics conventions, particularly of cosplayers, and what some women are doing about it. The article includes interviews with artist Erin Filson, one of the co-founders of Geeks for CONsent, which has called upon Comic-Con International to institute a more specific, and more visible, anti-harassment policy; cosplayer Nicole Jacobs, who describes a recent incident at AwesomeCon; and psychology professor Kimberly Fairchild, who studies harassment. [The Philadelphia Inquirer]

Creators | Frequent collaborators Kieron Gillen and Jamie McKelvie discuss their new series The Wicked + The Divine, which debuted this week from Image Comics. [USA Today]

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‘Young Avengers’ takes home a GLAAD Media Award

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Marvel’s latest Young Avengers series by Kieron Gillen and Jamie McKelvie has won a GLAAD Media Award for “Outstanding Comic Book.” The awards were presented last night in Los Angeles.

Young Avengers, which featured Loki, Miss America, Marvel Boy, Kate Bishop/Hawkeye and the homosexual couple Wiccan and Hulkling, wrapped up with its 15th issue in January. In addition to Gillen and McKelvie, other creators who worked on the book include Mike Norton, Kris Anka, Stephen Thompson, Becky Cloonan, Ming Doyle, Joe Quinones, Matthew Wilson, Jordie Bellaire, Maris Wicks, Lee Loughridge, Clayton Cowles, Lauren Sankovitch and Jake Thomas.

The awards honor outstanding portrayals of the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender communities in various media. Other nominees this year included Batwoman, which won two years ago; The Fearless Defenders; Husbands and Life With Archie. The original Young Avengers series won in 2006, while Avengers: The Children’s Crusade was nominated in 2011 and 2012, and Young Avengers Presents in 2009.

You can find a complete list of winners on the GLAAD site.

‘The Wicked & the Divine’ covers get limited-edition prints

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Following their debut this afternoon at ComicsAlliance, Jamie McKelvie is offering limited-edition giclee prints of the covers for the first issue of The Wicked & the Divine, his upcoming Image Comics series with Phonogram and Young Avengers collaborator Kieron Gillen.

Announced last month at Image Expo, the comic tells the story of gods reincarnated every 90 years into bodies and roam the Earth as pop stars and artists for two brief years, followed and adored by some and hated by others. The Wicked and the Divine premieres in June.

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Kieron Gillen details comics that influenced ‘Young Avengers’

young avengers15Following the conclusion this week of Kieron Gillen and Jame McKelvie’s run on Young Avengers with Issue 15, the writer turns to his blog to break down the comics that influenced the well-regarded series. And a couple of them may surprise you.

Grant Morrison is well-represented on the list, with We3, Kill Your Boyfriend and The Invisibles, and so is Peter Milligan. But Gillen also gives a shout-out to the 1970s oeuvre of the late Steve Gerber.

“Just have a wander through it. Howard the Duck, obv, but also his Defenders – a parallel I picked up when reading Colin TBTABC talk about it,” Gillen writes. “I’m not the biggest 70s connoisseur, so my knowledge is piecemeal, but his approach to superhero comics was something that resonated in the back of my head when writing Young Avengers, in terms of thinking of people who were absolutely mainstream while doing things that I wanted to do. Trollingly calling an arc STYLE > SUBSTANCE could have only been more of a Gerber move if I called it ON THE NOSE or something.”

There’s more at the blog, including a funny nod to one of Gillen and McKelvie’s previous collaborations.

Talking Comics with Tim | Lee Garbett on ‘Loki: Agent of Asgard’

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As part of All-New Marvel NOW!, veteran artist Lee Garbett will team in February with writer Al Ewing for Loki: Agent of Asgard, a series the god of mischief is fully grown and in the service of the All-Mother. More immediately, however, Marvel is setting the stage for the initiative with All-New Marvel NOW! Point One #1, a one-shot that arrives Jan. 8 with a Garbett-drawn Loki serving as the thread that brings together all of the stories.

In my interview with Garbett, the artist clearly relishes the opportunity to draw Asgard’s new “one-man secret service” as well as work with Ewing. ROBOT 6 is also pleased to provide an exclusive page from the upcoming All-New Marvel NOW Point One.

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Best of 7 | The best in comics from the last seven days

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Welcome to Best of 7, our new weekly wrap-up post here at Robot 6. Each Sunday we’ll talk about, as it says above, “The best in comics from the last seven days” — which could be anything from an exciting piece of news to a cool publisher’s announcement to an awesome comic that came out on Wednesday.

So without further ado, let’s get to it …

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Morrison, Gillen and McKelvie at the Edinburgh Book Festival

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I’m terribly fond of Joe Gordon, editor of the Forbidden Planet International blog. Last night he posted this video of himself hosting the Grant Morrison panel at the Edinburgh Book Festival. Gordon gets more confident as the panel goes on after a shaky start, bless him; Morrison is, as ever, tremendous value: He breaks down the plots of many of his upcoming projects, including much-anticipated projects as The Trial of Diana Prince, Seaguy Eternal, Multiversity, the hook of the Flash story he keeps mentioning, and the joys of pitching superheroes to Warner Bros.

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Re-reading ‘Invincible Iron Man,’ Part 3: ‘Stark Reslient’ and ‘My Monsters’

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Today we continue our look at Matt Fraction and Salvador Larroca’s The Invincible Iron Man run with the next three volumes, which contain another new direction for the series, and the several instances of people other than Larroca drawing the series for the first time.

Vols. 4 and 5: Stark Resilient Books 1 and 2 (#25-33 ): Like the 12-issue story arc “World’s Most Wanted,” “Stark Resilient” is such a long story arc that it takes up two trade collections.

When we last left Stark, his friends and allies had just reinstalled a back-up of his brain into his body after he was left in a vegetative state by his heroic efforts to deny Norman Osborn access to his most dangerous secrets. While the first two years of the book were devoted to following the Iron Man through-line of the publisher’s massive Civil War-to-Siege storyline, with the 25th issue Matt Fraction and Salvador Larroca essentially get to start over.

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What Are You Reading? with Shaun Manning

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Hello and welcome to What Are You Reading?, our weekly look at the comics, books and whatever else we’ve been checking out lately. Today our guest is Shaun Manning, a former staffer at CBR, occasional convention reporter and comics writer. His current project is a comic called Hell, Nebraska (with artist Anna Wieszczyk), and he’s currently running a Kickstarter to raise funds to publish it. So go check it out.

To see what Shaun and the Robot 6 crew have been reading, click below.

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What Are You Reading? with Chris Sims

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Hello and welcome to What Are You Reading?, our weekly look at all the comics and other stuff we’ve been checking out lately. Today our special guest is Chris Sims, senior writer for ComicsAlliance, blogger at Chris’s Invincible Super Blog and writer of comics like Dracula the Unconquered and Awesome Hospital.

To see what Chris and the Robot 6 crew have been reading, click below.

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Food or Comics? | Nutella or Nemo

Welcome to the very last Food or Comics. Next week our new-release picks will take a different format, but this week we’re still talking about what comics we’d buy at our local shop based on certain spending limits — $15 and $30 — as well as what we’d get if we had extra money or a gift card to spend on a splurge item.

Check out Diamond’s release list or ComicList, and tell us what you’re getting in our comments field.

Batman Incorporated #8

Batman Incorporated #8

Graeme McMillan

Let’s be honest, if I had $15, I’d make sure that Batman Incorporated #8 (DC Comics, $2.99) was first on my list. Not because of any controversy — I’ve been enjoying the series all along — but because I’d be worried it’d sell out if I waited. I’d also grab two Dynamite books: Jennifer Blood #23 and Masks #4 (both $3.99); Al Ewing has done just insane, amazing things on the former, and the Chris Roberson/Dennis Calero team on the latter is just killing it.

If I had $30, I’d find myself time traveling to all the weeks prior in which I didn’t use all $30 to borrow a dollar from past-me, just so that I could get Showcase Presents Justice League of America, Vol. 6 (DC Comics, $19.99), which takes the series firmly into the 1970s and brings the team face to face with villains including the Shaggy Man, Amazo and countless other favorites of my childhood.

Should I have some splurging left in me after that nostalgia-fest, I’d likely go for the Judge Anderson: PSI Files, Vol. 3 collection (Rebellion, $32.99), which picks the series up just after I’d dropped off the 2000AD radar for awhile, and hopefully gives me the chance to get back into the character, now that I am firmly into Thrill Power again.

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Kieron Gillen on the good, and the terribad, of Young Avengers #1

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With Young Avengers #1 on stands for the better part of a week now, writer Kieron Gillen has rolled out a “director’s commentary” of sorts that provides an entertaining and insightful peek behind the scenes of the Marvel series.

For instance, Gillen explains things like his goals for certain scenes, and how artist Jamie McKelvie had to redraw Hulkling’s tentacles, “because they originally looked like big ol’ cocks.” But perhaps most interesting are the defenses he lays out for a couple of criticisms of the issue — one I’d seen pop up online, the other I hadn’t.

The latter is Loki’s use of the portmanteau (it qualifies, yeah?) “terribad” during his confrontation with Miss America. “It’s funny. I got away with the Phone Booth but some people tripped over Terribad, when it’s absolutely IC [in character] for Loki in his mix of bad internet gibberish and old norse,” Gillen writes. “I suspect that’s people who’ve never read any of Kid Loki before. C’est la vie.”

However, it’s his explanation of the double-page title spread following the opening sequence, below, that proves the most engaging (don’t worry, it didn’t eat into the number of story pages).

“It serves a purpose here bar triumphalism,” Gillen writes. “It’s a cold hard break between the opening and the rest of the story – a hard re-set. Lauren did ask about the justification for this seemingly non-related intro, and I explained it to her as a PULP FICTION opening. [...] Essentially, it goes quiet-conversation in the style of the film setting mood, exploding into shouted sweary gun-wielding violence, freeze-frame and hard cut to the black screen with the titles and that Dick Dale Guitar. We don’t come back to the young robbers until way into the film, but it doesn’t matter- its initial purpose is that it explains Pulp Fiction in miniature, right there. And then we go to a much slower paced section which builds, etc. You know what the film is from then on in. That’s what the opening was for. The rest of the book is relatively grounded, but in the opening I give a concentrated portrait of the whole vision. This is what we do.”

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Marvel NOW! Test Case 002: Caleb reads Young Avengers #1

In November I decided to use myself as a case study for the first issue of one of the series debuting as part of Marvel NOW!, the publisher’s concentrated, unified effort to sell its comics to a wider audience, which presumably meant luring in lapsed and new readers. That first issue I read was Fantastic Four #1 by Matt Fraction and Mark Bagley; I didn’t much care for it.

This week I picked up Young Avengers #1 by Kieron Gillen, Jamie McKelvie and Mike Norton, giving it the same treatment. (Between the two, I also tried Fraction and Mike and Laura Allred’s FF #1 and loved it, but didn’t write about it in this manner because … well, I don’t remember why. Here’s what I said about the first issue the week it was released, though). Ready?

My background: I read the first dozen 2005-2006 Young Avengers comics by creators Allan Heinberg and Jim Cheung, but gradually lost interest in the characters at about the same rate Heinberg did. Over the years I’ve read various Young Avengers-related comics, most of which Marvel seemed to be producing to fill the demand for Young Avengers comics while waiting for Heinberg to write more: Young Avengers Presents, Civil War: Young Avengers and Runaways, Secret Invasion: Runaways/Young Avengers. But when he finally did return, I didn’t.

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