Jim Zub Archives - Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

With release of ‘Flash’ #36, news spreads of André Coelho’s death

AndreCoelho-banner

Today DC Comics released The Flash #36, an issue that represents the final work of Brazilian artist André Coelho. His death, while not widely reported until today, occurred in mid-October, as noted by this Oct. 20 MeiaLua memorial podcast. DC dedicated the issue of The Flash to the 35-year-old artist.

Co-writer Van Jensen also paid tribute to Coelho on his blog, writing, “He was an incredible artist, able to convey so much emotion into every panel. André also was always as nice as could be, responding to any request with a simple, ‘No problem!'”

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Made in Japan: Cummings and Zub talk ‘Wayward’

Wayward01A-teaser

In 2010, UDON Entertainment published Vent, an anthology/art book celebrating the company’s 10th anniversary. Artist Steven Cummings contributed a piece of art to the collection, which at the time caught the eye of Jim Zub.

“I asked him, ‘What is this? Are you doing anything with this?'” the writer told Comic Book Resources, “and he said, ‘Oh, I had this idea I wanted to do – something supernatural set in Japan, but I don’t know much of how it would work beyond that.'”

Their conversations grew into Wayward, a creator-owned series by Zub, Cummings and colorist John Rauch debuting Aug. 27 from Image Comics this summer. Cummings and Zub were kind enough to answer some questions and share artwork from the series. To see more of Cummings’ artwork, be sure to check out his deviantART site.

Robot 6: Steve, I’ll start with you. How long have you been living in Japan, and where exactly do you live?

Steven Cummings: I like to tell people that I live in almost-Tokyo to keep down the offers of random people to “visit” me (and who really just want to stay somewhere for free during their Tokyo vacation). It’s just outside the window, beckoning at me but not so close that I have to pay the Tokyo taxes. I think I am going on my 10th year here total. I was a student back in the late ’90s and early 2000s, and lived up in Saitama and only moved back stateside when I started getting offers from publishers to draw comics.

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Jim Zub explains why ‘Networking Is Not What You Think It Is’

Editor’s note: It’s with great pleasure that we present a guest post from Jim Zub, writer of Skullkickers, Samurai Jack, Red Sonja and Cub, Disney Kingdoms: Figment and many more. Jim regularly shares his insights and tips from his own experiences breaking into the comic industry over on his blog, and when he offered to let us post the latest one I jumped at the chance. This one, on networking, has good tips whether you’re looking to be a comic pro or just looking for a job in general.

Thanks to Jim for sharing; you can see the post on his blog right here.

*****

Jim Zubkavich

Jim Zub

by Jim Zub

“Networking” is one of those broad social terms that get tossed out in conversation, and everyone who’s been around a while nods their head knowingly when the word comes up, but it’s something I think is quite misunderstood by a lot of people trying to get their start in comics or any other creative business.

Networking is not entering a social setting, finding the most “powerful” person there and trying to dazzle them so you can become “friends”.

It’s not sending lists of questions to professionals so they can “help” you break in.

It’s not tagging people on Facebook so they see your artwork or writing.

It’s not about dominating a conversation or hogging the spotlight.

It’s not nepotism or elitism, contrary to what some may think.

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Best of 7 | The best in comics from the last seven days

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Welcome to Best of 7, where we talk about, as it says above, “The best in comics from the last seven days” — which could be anything from an exciting piece of news to a cool publisher’s announcement to an awesome comic that came out. So without further ado, let’s get to it …

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Quote of the Day | ‘Don’t give up’

Jim Zub

Jim Zub

“I know it may sound corny but I’m serious when I say this – Don’t give up. There will be lost opportunities and frustrations, regrets and anxieties. Do everything you can to focus on what you can control and keep your integrity intact. Do all you can with what you have. That’s what the year represents to me.”

Jim Zub, writer of Skullkickers, Samurai Jack, Pathfinder, Legends of the Dark Knight, Makeshift Miracle and Shadowman, and almost-writer of Birds of Prey. In a post titled “A Great Year That Almost Wasn’t,” Jim discusses how losing the Birds of Prey gig at the beginning of 2013 affected his self-confidence, how he bounced back from it and ultimately landed on Samurai Jack.

Otters and OHMU: Six random questions with Jim Zub

robotroulette

Thirty-six questions. Six answers. One random number generator. Welcome to Robot Roulette, where creators roll the virtual dice and answer our questions about their lives, careers, interests and more.

Joining us today is Jim Zub, writer of Skullkickers, Pathfinder, Makeshift Miracle and IDW’s upcoming Samurai Jack, among others.

Now let’s get to it …

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Food or Comics? | Nutella or Nemo

Welcome to the very last Food or Comics. Next week our new-release picks will take a different format, but this week we’re still talking about what comics we’d buy at our local shop based on certain spending limits — $15 and $30 — as well as what we’d get if we had extra money or a gift card to spend on a splurge item.

Check out Diamond’s release list or ComicList, and tell us what you’re getting in our comments field.

Batman Incorporated #8

Batman Incorporated #8

Graeme McMillan

Let’s be honest, if I had $15, I’d make sure that Batman Incorporated #8 (DC Comics, $2.99) was first on my list. Not because of any controversy — I’ve been enjoying the series all along — but because I’d be worried it’d sell out if I waited. I’d also grab two Dynamite books: Jennifer Blood #23 and Masks #4 (both $3.99); Al Ewing has done just insane, amazing things on the former, and the Chris Roberson/Dennis Calero team on the latter is just killing it.

If I had $30, I’d find myself time traveling to all the weeks prior in which I didn’t use all $30 to borrow a dollar from past-me, just so that I could get Showcase Presents Justice League of America, Vol. 6 (DC Comics, $19.99), which takes the series firmly into the 1970s and brings the team face to face with villains including the Shaggy Man, Amazo and countless other favorites of my childhood.

Should I have some splurging left in me after that nostalgia-fest, I’d likely go for the Judge Anderson: PSI Files, Vol. 3 collection (Rebellion, $32.99), which picks the series up just after I’d dropped off the 2000AD radar for awhile, and hopefully gives me the chance to get back into the character, now that I am firmly into Thrill Power again.

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Talking Comics with Tim | Aubrey Sitterson

Gear Monkey (from DoubleFeature Comics)

Former Marvel editor Aubrey Sitterson has made the leap to the wonderful world of freelance writing. To mark this critical career jump, Sitterson stopped by Talking Comics with Tim to discuss his transition from editor to writer, as well as his current and upcoming projects — namely the Gear Monkey tale (by Sitterson with art by Nate Lovett) that appears in DoubleFeature Comics‘ digital release Fantasy Double Feature #3, and Redakai (for Viz Media). I was interested to learn why Sitterson lettered his own Gear Monkey tale, as well as to discuss his love of wrestling.

Tim O’Shea: You started out in the industry on the editorial side, but am I correct in assuming it was always in hopes of pursuing a full-time writing career?

Aubrey Sitterson: You’re ab-so-lutely correct, sir. While I really enjoyed my time editing comics, the goal has always been to transition into a comics writer. It was all part of my devious master plan to start at Marvel as an intern in college, get hired as an Assistant Editor, stick my finger in as many pies as I could, learn at the knee of two of comics’ best editors (Tom Brevoort and Axel Alonso) then strike out on my own in pursuit of Complete and Utter Comics Domination. I’m still working on that last part.

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