Joe Hill Archives - Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

‘Locke & Key’s’ Gabriel Rodriguez offers a peek inside Keyhouse

locke and key1

As a kid I became obsessed with the Official Handbook of the Marvel Universe and Who’s Who in the DC Universe, not so much because of the character entries (the former far more exhaustive than the latter) but because of the headquarters floor plans: Avengers Mansion, the Justice League Satellite, the Baxter Building, Challengers Mountain, Avengers Compound — heck, even the Serpent Society headquarters.

It didn’t matter whether I knew much of the characters (the Challengers of the Unknown) or didn’t care about them (the Serpent Society, really?), I’d pore over them by the hour. (I bought Mayfair’s New Teen Titans role-playing game just for the plans to Titans Tower; never did play it.)

What started me on that trip down memory lane are the incredible plans and cross-section drawings of Key House that Gabriel Rodriguez has been has been posting on Twitter the past few days. They’re destined to become end sheets for the Lock & Key: Alpha & Omega hardcover, but they could easily stand alone in their own book. They’re just that beautiful and meticulous (you can see more on Rodriguez’s Twttier under “#Keyhouse“).

You’ll have to wait a while to see them in print: The Lock & Key: Alpha & Omega hardcover arrives in February from IDW Publishing. In the meantime, I need to unearth those tattered copies of Who’s Who and OHOTMU

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Comics A.M. | Rare Brazilian comics stolen in armed robbery

O Lobinho

O Lobinho

Crime | Three armed men invaded the home of comics collector Antonio Jose da Silva in Sao Paolo, Brazil, and held him and two employees at gunpoint while they stole more than 7,000 comics from his collection of about 200,000. The robbers seemed to know exactly what they were looking for, as they went straight for the most valuable books. Their haul included more than 200 first editions of O Lobinho and O Gibi, which reprinted translations of American comics in the 1930s and 1940s. The value of the thieves haul is estimated at $150,000, and the loss will be borne by da Silva, who was unable to get insurance for his collection. [The Comics Reporter]

Comics | Dana Jennings looks at the renewed interest in EC Comics, once reviled in the popular press as mind-destroying trash that would lead youths astray, now revered by the comics cognoscenti as subversive graphic literature. Locke & Key writer Joe Hill and EC Archives editor Russ Cochran weigh in, as does Fantagraphics President Gary Groth, editor of that company’s EC Library, who says, “They were arguably the best commercial comics company in the history of the medium, and their list of artists and writers between 1950 and 1955 represents a Who’s Who of the most accomplished craftsmen working in comics at that time.” [The New York Times]

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Comics A.M. | ‘Infinity’ #1 is this year’s third ‘million-dollar book’

Skottie Young's variant for "Infinity" #1

Skottie Young’s variant for “Infinity” #1

Publishing | ICv2 continues its look at August’s direct market numbers, declaring Marvel’s Infinity #1 a million-dollar book, the third this year to top $1 million in sales, thanks to its $4.99 cover price and estimated orders of 205,000 (DC Comics’ Justice League of America #1 and Superman Unchained #1 are the other two). However, it’s also important to note that Infinity #1 was offered to retailers at a deep discount (up to 70 percent). [ICv2]

Digital comics | Jeff DiBartolomeo explains why he left his job at HBO (he was one of the developers of their HBO Go app) to become chief technical officer at comiXology: “What’s interesting to me is seeing this market, which is one I’m not vary familiar with, and seeing the potential. It’s proving to be useful to have me come [to Comixology] with a different set of eyes, at a different angle.” [TechHive]

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What I saw at Boston Comic Con

Boom BCC

This was a tough year for Boston Comic Con: It was originally scheduled for the weekend after the Boston Marathon, and although organizers worked tirelessly not to cancel the event, the venue was within the lockdown zone following the bombings, and the load-in day coincided with the massive manhunt forsuspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. In the end, they had no choice but to shut down the convention. As most of the talent was already in town, local retailers sponsored a number of mini-cons.

Despite the cheerful we-can-get-through-this attitude of that weekend, things were looking pretty bleak. And then Boston Comic Con came roaring back, in a new venue and with a new attitude. This year, it felt less like a local event and more like a big-city con, with a smattering of publisher booths and an array of top-tier talent. The convention has grown quickly, from 1,000 attendees at the first con in 2007 to 15,000 last year. This year, with a bigger venue and more guests, I’m guessing the final number will be even higher.

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IDW brings home horrors of war in Joe Hill’s ‘Thumbprint’

thumbprint-cropped

Author Joe Hill and writer Jason Ciaramella, who collaborated on the Eisner-nominated miniseries The Cape, are reteaming for Joe Hill’s Thumbprint, debuting in June from IDW Publishing.

Featuring art by Vic Malhotra, the three-issue adaptation of Hill’s original novella is described as “a tale of fear, terror and indelible remorse” about U.S. Army Pvt. Mallory Grennan who, following a dishonorable discharge, hopes to begin a new life back home, away from what she’s seen and done in Abu Ghraib prison. However, Mal’s crimes follow her all the way back to the United States.

“I was blown away by Jason’s work on The Cape, and wanted more,” Hill said in a statement. “Thumbprint is right in his wheelhouse: Jay has a feel for the psychological flaws that lead a basically good person down the wrong path. And no one writes action quite like Jay — he turns brutality into surreal comedy and back again faster than a magician turning a scarf into a dove. Add to that an opportunity to work with an artist like Vic Malhotra — who draws with a severe grace, and brings to mind the work Mazzucchelli was doing in Batman: Year One — and I think we’ve got all the ingredients for something that can really explode off the page.”

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This week it’s a choice between navy beans and Nova

Welcome to Food or Comics?, where every week we talk about what comics we’d buy at our local comic shop based on certain spending limits — $15 and $30 — as well as what we’d get if we had extra money or a gift card to spend on a splurge item.

Check out Diamond’s release list or ComicList, and tell us what you’re getting in our comments field.

Nova #1

Nova #1

Chris Arrant

If I had $15, I’d buy the leading contender for best ongoing series this year, Saga #10 (Image, $2.99). I loved the last issue focusing on the Will, but I’m excited at the prospect this one teases of Izabel returning – although in a red-tinged, seemingly evil demeanor. After that I’d get another creator-owned gem with Francesco Francavilla’s The Black Beetle #2 (Dark Horse, $3.99). I love the latitude Dark Horse is giving Francavilla in the design packaging here – that cover is something special — and luckily, the insides have the promise of being even better given what happened last issue. Third and last in my $15 haul this week would be Dark Horse Presents #21 (Dark Horse, $7.99). Criminally underrated and consciously mind-blowing, this issue promises three new serials debuting plus a collaboration between Neil Gaiman and Paul Chadwick about alien saucers. Why isn’t this a top-selling book?

If I had $30, I’d make it a Dark Horse trifecta with Conan the Barbarian #13 (Dark Horse, $3.50). How does Brian Wood do it, finding such great artists that no one else knows about like Mirko Colak? This time, Conan tries to conquer the desert. Then I’d do a Marvel trifecta: Avengers #6 (Marvel, $3.99), Nova #1 (Marvel, $3.99) and Thor: God of Thunder #5 (Marvel, $3.99). Avengers has seemingly the origin of my formerly most favorite D-list hero in the Marvel Universe, Captain Universe – until she upgraded to the A-list as an Avenger. Then Nova has a spirited, seemingly kid-friendly romp by Jeph Loeb and Ed McGuinness. Then Thor … Thor. This thoroughly dark and mythic story has made Jason Aaron’s beard even more ominous than before.

If I could splurge, I’d get Alter-Ego #115 (TwoMorrows, $8.95). Normally a magazine about comics, in this issue they collect some lost gems – namely the stereoscopic comics (3-D!) – of the 1950s. 3-D glasses included, this issue contains work by Joe Simon, Jack Kirby, Joe Kubert, Curt Swan (!!), George Tuska and more. Truly a highlight of the week.

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What Are You Reading? with Josh Wigler

Sweet Tooth #40

Hello and welcome to What Are You Reading?, our weekly look at exactly what the title says. This week we welcome special guest Josh Wigler, editor of MTV Splash Page and former CBR contributor.

To see what Josh and the Robot 6 crew have been reading, click below.

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Comics A.M. | Ape Entertainment scores digital hit with Temple Run

Temple Run #1

Digital comics | The top-selling digital comic may not be what you think: Rich Johnston reports that Ape Entertainment’s game comic Temple Run is the top paid book app in the iTunes store (it was No. 2 this morning). He also reveals that Ape Entertainment has sold a million copies of its digital Pocket God comic. [Bleeding Cool]

Publishing | Jen Vaughn and friends pay a visit to the offices of MAD magazine. [Flog]

Conventions | Corinna Kirsh files a report, with plenty of pictures, on last weekend’s Brooklyn Comics and Graphics Festival. [L Magazine]

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Robot Roulette | Christos Gage

If you’ve been paying attention the last few weeks, you know the score–I’ve got 36 random questions that need to be answered, and every week I throw six of them at a different comic creator. What questions they answer is determined by the fates–or, more specifically, a random number generator.

This week we welcome Christos Gage to Robot Roulette. You know Gage from such titles as Avengers Academy, Angel and Faith, The First X-Men, X-Men Legacy, Sunset and many more.

Now let’s get to it …

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Locke & Key wins British Fantasy Award

IDW Publishing’s Locke & Key, by Joe Hill and Gabriel Rodriguez, won the 2012 British Fantasy Award for best comic or graphic novel, presented Friday at FantasyCon in Brighton, England.

Administered annually by the British Fantasy Society, the awards are voted on by the organization’s members and attendees of FantasyCon 2010 and 2011.

Locke & Key, which also won the award in 2009, competed this year against Animal Man by Jeff Lemire and Travel Foreman, Batwoman by J.H. Williams III and W. Haden Blackman, The Unwritten by Mike Carey and Peter Gross, and The Walking Dead by Robert Kirkman and Charlie Adlard.

Debuting in 2008, the horror series tells the story of Keyhouse, a New England mansion whose doors transform anyone who walks through them — and home to a relentless creature that won’t rest until it forces open the most terrible door of them all.

Food or Comics? | Amontillado or Amulet

Welcome to Food or Comics?, where every week we talk about what comics we’d buy at our local comic shop based on certain spending limits — $15 and $30 — as well as what we’d get if we had extra money or a gift card to spend on a splurge item.

Check out Diamond’s release list or ComicList, and tell us what you’re getting in our comments field.

Locke & Key: Grindhouse

Graeme McMillan

I don’t know quite why, considering I’ve been feeling cynical and disinterested in the DC Universe over the past couple of weeks, but I find myself tempted by both Flash Annual #1 and Justice League International Annual #1 (both DC Comics; $4.99) this week; something even more surprising considering I haven’t been following the JLI series past trying out the first issue. And yet, if I had $15 this week, I suspect I’d be using a chunk of it for that. I’d also grab Joe Hill and Gabriel Hernandez’ Locke & Key: Grindhouse (IDW Publishing, $3.99), because, well, Locke & Key is a very, very good comic book.

If I had $30, I may find myself picking up the first collection of Peter Panzerfaust (Vol. 1: The Great Escape; Image Comics; $14.99) because I like the high concept behind it even if I managed to miss the single issues. People who did pick it up in singles: Is it the kind of thing I’d like, do you think?

Should I find the money and ability to splurge, I find myself surprisingly drawn to Dark Horse’s Star Wars Omnibus: Clone Wars Vol. 1 ($24.99); I blame people in my Twitter feed talking about Star Wars Celebration last week, and my thinking, “I haven’t really kept up with Star Wars in ages” in response. Does that count as peer pressure?

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SDCC ’12 | A roundup of news and announcements from Friday

Comic-Con International kicked into full gear Friday in a bustling second day that was capped off last night with the presentation of the 24th annual Will Eisner Comic Industry Awards. Here’s the highlights of the announcements emerging from the second day — and a few holdovers from the first day — of the San Diego convention:

• During its annual “Cup O’ Joe” panel, Marvel teased post-Avengers Vs. X-Men plans that include: A+X, described as “the opposite of [AvX: VS],” by such creators as Jeph Loeb, Dan Slott, Dale Keown and Ron Garney; Avengers Vs. X-Men: Consequences, a five-issue miniseries written by Kieron Gillen that addresses the effects of the summer crossover; Marvel NOW! Point One, featuring Nick Fury Jr.; and an October one-shot called Avengers Vs. X-Men: Babies, by Skottie Young.

• After initially dismissing Kickstarter as a potential source of money for the stalled Goon animated movie, creator Eric Powell teased he plans to launch a campaign on the crowd-funding website.

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What Are You Reading? with Ivan Anaya

Crimson

Hello and welcome to What Are You Reading? This week our special guest is artist Ivan Anaya, one of the winners of the winner of the Skullkickers Tavern Tales Contest. He’ll join the other winner, writer Aubrey Sitterson, on a story for Skullkickers #18.

To see what Ivan and the Robot 6 crew have been reading, click below.

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Nominees announced for 2012 Hugo Awards

Finalists have been announced for the 2011 Hugo Awards, which recognize the best in science fiction and fantasy. Presented annually since 1955 by the World Science Fiction Society, the Hugo is among science fiction’s most prestigious awards.

This year’s winners will be presented Sept. 2 in Chicago during Chicon 7, the 70th World Science Fiction Convention.

The nominees for best graphic story are:

Digger, by Ursula Vernon (Sofawolf Press)
Fables, Vol. 15: Rose Red, by Bill Willingham and Mark Buckingham (Vertigo)
Locke & Key, Vol. 4: Keys to the Kingdom, written by Joe Hill, illustrated by Gabriel Rodriguez (IDW Publishing)
Schlock Mercenary: Force Multiplication, written and illustrated by Howard Tayler, colors by Travis Walton (The Tayler Corporation)
The Unwritten, Vol. 4: Leviathan, created by Mike Carey and Peter Gross, written by Mike Carey, illustrated by Peter Gross (Vertigo)

This is the fourth year for the graphic story category. Girl Genius, which won the first three years, was not included on the ballot at the request of creators Phil and Kaja Foglio.

Nominees of note in other categories include Dan dos Santos for best professional artist, xkcd creator Randall Munroe for best fan artist, and Captain America: The First Avenger and Hugo for best dramatic presentation-long form. See the full list of nominees on the Hugo Awards website.

Six by 6 | Six superhero series Joe Hill & Gabriel Rodriguez could do

During an exclusive interview with CBR TV at WonderCon in Anaheim, bestselling author Joe Hill revealed that he’s working with his Locke & Key collaborator Gabriel Rodriguez on a “established superhero title” for DC Comics or Marvel. While he’s best known for comic creations that don’t wear a cape or cowl, Hill is no stranger to superheroes: He’s producing The Cape for IDW Publishing, and he made his comics debut in 2005 in Marvel’s Spider-Man Unlimited #8. Although news of what character (or characters), what universe, or even what format their superhero story will be, we have a few suggestions:

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