John Green Archives - Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

‘Can you really argue that Batman is good for Gotham?’

john-green

John Green is the author of such bestselling young-adult novels as Looking for Alaska and The Fault in Our Stars, a prolific vlogger and, it turns out, a vocal opponent of the Dark Knight.

In a recent video, titled simply “I Kind of Hate Batman,” Green makes it clear this isn’t simply a preference for, oh, say Spider-Man. No, he has serious issues with the very essence of the Caped Crusader.

“Batman is just a rich guy with an affinity for bats who’s playing out his insane fantasy of single-handedly ridding Gotham of crime,” he says. “How is that heroic? […] Can you really argue that Batman is good for Gotham? I mean, in the Batman universe, crime is caused by 1.) evil people who just want to see the world burn, and 2.) stupid people who follow the evil but charismatic cat-persons/Joker/Penguin — God, the villains in Batman are terrible!”

Continue Reading »

Food or Comics? | Popeye or popcorn

Welcome to Food or Comics?, where every week we talk about what comics we’d buy at our local comic shop based on certain spending limits — $15 and $30 — as well as what we’d get if we had extra money or a gift card to spend on a splurge item.

Check out Diamond’s release list or ComicList, and tell us what you’re getting in our comments field.

AvX: Vs #1

Chris Arrant

If I had $15, I’d go all-in on AvX: Vs #1 (Marvel, $3.99). As a story format-junkie, this seems like an ideal supplemental series to the event comic series as we know it – I may have read it wrong, but this seems low on continuity and high on action – kind of a throwback to the condensed comics of the ’60s, I hope. And seeing Kathryn and Stuart Immonen on this together is a big deal – wish they’d get more chances like this! Next up would be the finale of The Twelve, #12 (Marvel, $2.99). I argued with myself about waiting for the trade at this point, but at the end of the day I’m more interested in this than a lot of everything else going on out there. Plus, I bought the eleven previous issues so I should finish it out, right? Next up would be Spaceman #6 (DC/Vertigo, $2.99). I’m finding this series benefits from a deeper re-reading prior to each new issues, but it’s paying off in spades in terms of my enjoyment. This is definitely a palate cleanser after Azzarello and Risso’s run on 100 Bullets, but in a good way. Finally, I’d get Daredevil #11 (Marvel, $2.99). The Eisner Awards judges got this one right when they piled nominations on this book, because Waid, Martin, and Rivera have really made the quintessential superhero book here. The fill-ins from Khoi Pham and Marco Checchetto seem off-putting, but they’ve earned some lee-way after the murderer’s row of creators who started the book. Can’t wait to see Samnee on this, however.

If I had $30, I’d start off with an interesting looking project that’s gotten no press – Airboy: Deadeye #1 (Antarctic Press, $3.50). Chuck Dixon and Ben Dunn — what a pairing. After that I’d go back to get Supercrooks #2 (Marvel/Icon, $2.99); Mark Millar knows how to sell a high-concept, but it’s Leinil Yu that’s making me come back past the first issue. After that would be an Avengers two-fer: New Avengers #25 (Marvel, $3.99) and Secret Avengers #26 (Marvel, $3.99). I dropped off New a few issues back, but with this new issue covering some never-before-seen connections between Iron Fist and the Phoenix Force, I’m back in for this one. And Secret Avengers, well, Remender’s on a roll with his Marvel work and this is continuing on that without being an Uncanny X-Force retread. And guest artist Renato Guedes seems a better fit for this than his work on Wolverine.

If I could splurge, I’d lunge for a copy of The Art of Amanda Conner (IDW/Desperado, $29.99). I was fortunate enough to get a digital review copy of this earlier, and seeing it like that only made me want this more. Rather than just being a template art book plugging in her work, the design and packaging really go along with what you’d expect from Amanda’s tongue-in-cheek comic style. Reading this makes me want to go back and track down her earlier work that I missed.

Continue Reading »

Teen Boat makes the voyage to print

Dave Roman is on a roll these days. First the prestige publisher First Second picks up his Astronaut Elementary and turns it into a beautiful, shiny graphic novel (retitled Astronaut Academy), and now Houghton Mifflin is going to do the same with his goofy webcomic Teen Boat (co-created with John Green).

“The angst of being a teen… the thrill of being a boat!” Did someone just toss the words “teen” and “boat” to Dave and John and dare them to make something out of them? Well, they did, and it’s damn funny, too. Heidi has the press release on the new book, which includes the seldom-seen phrase “featured everywhere from MTV to Boating World Magazine,” at The Beat. The book is due out in Spring 2011.

Teen Boat won the Ignatz Award for best debut in 2004, so this has been a long time coming. You can still enjoy the online version for free, but the book will be in color and include 33 new pages of story.


Browse the Robot 6 Archives