Kieron Gillen Archives - Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

‘Young Avengers’ takes home a GLAAD Media Award

young-avengers1-kiss

Marvel’s latest Young Avengers series by Kieron Gillen and Jamie McKelvie has won a GLAAD Media Award for “Outstanding Comic Book.” The awards were presented last night in Los Angeles.

Young Avengers, which featured Loki, Miss America, Marvel Boy, Kate Bishop/Hawkeye and the homosexual couple Wiccan and Hulkling, wrapped up with its 15th issue in January. In addition to Gillen and McKelvie, other creators who worked on the book include Mike Norton, Kris Anka, Stephen Thompson, Becky Cloonan, Ming Doyle, Joe Quinones, Matthew Wilson, Jordie Bellaire, Maris Wicks, Lee Loughridge, Clayton Cowles, Lauren Sankovitch and Jake Thomas.

The awards honor outstanding portrayals of the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender communities in various media. Other nominees this year included Batwoman, which won two years ago; The Fearless Defenders; Husbands and Life With Archie. The original Young Avengers series won in 2006, while Avengers: The Children’s Crusade was nominated in 2011 and 2012, and Young Avengers Presents in 2009.

You can find a complete list of winners on the GLAAD site.


‘The Wicked & the Divine’ covers get limited-edition prints

wicked-divine-cropped

Following their debut this afternoon at ComicsAlliance, Jamie McKelvie is offering limited-edition giclee prints of the covers for the first issue of The Wicked & the Divine, his upcoming Image Comics series with Phonogram and Young Avengers collaborator Kieron Gillen.

Announced last month at Image Expo, the comic tells the story of gods reincarnated every 90 years into bodies and roam the Earth as pop stars and artists for two brief years, followed and adored by some and hated by others. The Wicked and the Divine premieres in June.

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Kieron Gillen details comics that influenced ‘Young Avengers’

young avengers15Following the conclusion this week of Kieron Gillen and Jame McKelvie’s run on Young Avengers with Issue 15, the writer turns to his blog to break down the comics that influenced the well-regarded series. And a couple of them may surprise you.

Grant Morrison is well-represented on the list, with We3, Kill Your Boyfriend and The Invisibles, and so is Peter Milligan. But Gillen also gives a shout-out to the 1970s oeuvre of the late Steve Gerber.

“Just have a wander through it. Howard the Duck, obv, but also his Defenders – a parallel I picked up when reading Colin TBTABC talk about it,” Gillen writes. “I’m not the biggest 70s connoisseur, so my knowledge is piecemeal, but his approach to superhero comics was something that resonated in the back of my head when writing Young Avengers, in terms of thinking of people who were absolutely mainstream while doing things that I wanted to do. Trollingly calling an arc STYLE > SUBSTANCE could have only been more of a Gerber move if I called it ON THE NOSE or something.”

There’s more at the blog, including a funny nod to one of Gillen and McKelvie’s previous collaborations.

Talking Comics with Tim | Lee Garbett on ‘Loki: Agent of Asgard’

lokiGuns

As part of All-New Marvel NOW!, veteran artist Lee Garbett will team in February with writer Al Ewing for Loki: Agent of Asgard, a series the god of mischief is fully grown and in the service of the All-Mother. More immediately, however, Marvel is setting the stage for the initiative with All-New Marvel NOW! Point One #1, a one-shot that arrives Jan. 8 with a Garbett-drawn Loki serving as the thread that brings together all of the stories.

In my interview with Garbett, the artist clearly relishes the opportunity to draw Asgard’s new “one-man secret service” as well as work with Ewing. ROBOT 6 is also pleased to provide an exclusive page from the upcoming All-New Marvel NOW Point One.

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Best of 7 | The best in comics from the last seven days

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Welcome to Best of 7, our new weekly wrap-up post here at Robot 6. Each Sunday we’ll talk about, as it says above, “The best in comics from the last seven days” — which could be anything from an exciting piece of news to a cool publisher’s announcement to an awesome comic that came out on Wednesday.

So without further ado, let’s get to it …

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The Fifth Color | The Iron Man you think you know

IronMan17_cvrKieron Gillen had to remind me to be angry. I read through my comics stash for the week, feeling very proud of myself and then went on about my day, wondering what I was going to be writing for you, Dear Reader (hi, Mom!). Then I browse through Twitter to see this posted by the writer: “You know, after yesterday with Iron Man 17 and YA11, I’d have expected my @s to be worse, but people are being really nice. Thanks!”

Being really nice? Why shouldn’t they? What should I be mad at?! Nothing happened that was all that shocking in Young Avengers, as long as you know who Loki is and that Loki: Agent of Asgard is debuting in February, so it’s just putting two and two together. That couldn’t be the reason for torches and pitchforks. Then I remembered Iron Man #17 and still felt no need to reach for my oil-soaked rags and farming tools. There’s a twist to be sure, and a fairly large change to Tony Stark’s tried and true origin, but is the cover right? Is this really “The shocking conclusion that will change the world of Iron Man forever”?

Not exactly. Read on and find out why!

WARNING: Oh yeah, big spoilers for the current run on Iron Man! Huge, massive spoilers. Click no further if you haven’t read Iron Man #17! But if you have (or simply love spoilers), please do read on!

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Morrison, Gillen and McKelvie at the Edinburgh Book Festival

GraMo header

I’m terribly fond of Joe Gordon, editor of the Forbidden Planet International blog. Last night he posted this video of himself hosting the Grant Morrison panel at the Edinburgh Book Festival. Gordon gets more confident as the panel goes on after a shaky start, bless him; Morrison is, as ever, tremendous value: He breaks down the plots of many of his upcoming projects, including much-anticipated projects as The Trial of Diana Prince, Seaguy Eternal, Multiversity, the hook of the Flash story he keeps mentioning, and the joys of pitching superheroes to Warner Bros.

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SDCC ’13 | A roundup of pre-convention news

robotech-voltronPreview Night doesn’t begin for another 11 hours, but judging from the flurry of announcements, Comic-Con International has been well under way since, oh, about Monday. So, if it feels like you’re already falling behind, that’s because you probably are.

To help you catch up, we’ve rounded up early news from DC Comics, Dynamite Entertainment, Madefire and Marvel, along with a few other convention-related items.

• Dynamite Entertainment came out of the gate running this week with news that Steve Niles and Dennis Calero will reboot Army of Darkness, James Robinson will launch his crime romance Grand Passion, the Legends of Red Sonja miniseries will team Gail Simone with an all-female creative team that includes Marjorie M. Liu, Nancy A. Collins, Kelly Sue DeConnick, Mercedes Lackey, Nicola Scott and Devin Grayson, Peter Milligan will debut his sci-fi action series Terminal Hero, Duane Swiercyznski will expand the publisher’s crime line with Ex-Con, Howard Chaykin will return to The Shadow with the miniseries Midnight in Moscow, NBC’s Heroes will get a “fifth season” in a series written by Cullen Bunn, the acquisition of the Robotech license spawns a Robotech/Voltron crossover, and The Heart of the Beast, the graphic novel by Dean Motter, Judith Dupré and Sean Phillips, will receive a 20th-anniversary prestige-format edition.

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What Are You Reading? with Shaun Manning

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Hello and welcome to What Are You Reading?, our weekly look at the comics, books and whatever else we’ve been checking out lately. Today our guest is Shaun Manning, a former staffer at CBR, occasional convention reporter and comics writer. His current project is a comic called Hell, Nebraska (with artist Anna Wieszczyk), and he’s currently running a Kickstarter to raise funds to publish it. So go check it out.

To see what Shaun and the Robot 6 crew have been reading, click below.

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Comics A.M. | TCAF wrap-up; Robocop license moves to BOOM!

TCAF poster by Taiyo Matsumoto

TCAF poster by Taiyo Matsumoto

Events | Heidi MacDonald beats everyone else to the punch and files the definitive report on the Toronto Comic Arts Festival, which featured a flurry of graphic novel debuts and appearances by artists as diverse as Taiyo Matsumoto (Tekkonkinkreet) and Andrew Hussie (Homestuck). [Publishers Weekly]

Publishing | BOOM! Studios will publish a line of Robocop comics beginning in August. Dynamite Entertainment had the license previously, but company President Nick Barrucci said the rights reverted to the licensor, who granted them to BOOM! [ICv2]

Publishing | Brian Truitt takes a look at Valiant’s lineup for the second summer of its new life, and he talks to the creators about the relaunch and their plans for the future. [USA Today]

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What Are You Reading? with James Hornsby

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Hello and welcome to What Are You Reading?, our weekly look into the reading habits of the Robot 6 gang. Today’s special guest is James Hornsby, the cartoonist behind Botched Spot and Over Like Olav.

To see what James and the Robot 6 crew are reading, click below …

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Comics A.M. | Scrutinizing Marvel Unlimited and DC Comics apps

Marvel Unlimited

Marvel Unlimited

Digital comics | Although the Marvel Unlimited and DC Comics apps work very differently, Noel Murray has similar complaints about both: Specific titles are difficult to find, and the damn things keep crashing: “Frankly, while some of the other major comics apps have better search functions — Dark Horse’s, for example — none of the big companies have created the digital comics retailing equivalent of an Amazon or iTunes.” [Hero Complex]

Publishing | Drawn & Quarterly has announced its fall lineup, which includes Peter Bagge’s biography Woman Rebel: The Margaret Sanger Story. [Drawn & Quarterly]

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Food or Comics? | Nutella or Nemo

Welcome to the very last Food or Comics. Next week our new-release picks will take a different format, but this week we’re still talking about what comics we’d buy at our local shop based on certain spending limits — $15 and $30 — as well as what we’d get if we had extra money or a gift card to spend on a splurge item.

Check out Diamond’s release list or ComicList, and tell us what you’re getting in our comments field.

Batman Incorporated #8

Batman Incorporated #8

Graeme McMillan

Let’s be honest, if I had $15, I’d make sure that Batman Incorporated #8 (DC Comics, $2.99) was first on my list. Not because of any controversy — I’ve been enjoying the series all along — but because I’d be worried it’d sell out if I waited. I’d also grab two Dynamite books: Jennifer Blood #23 and Masks #4 (both $3.99); Al Ewing has done just insane, amazing things on the former, and the Chris Roberson/Dennis Calero team on the latter is just killing it.

If I had $30, I’d find myself time traveling to all the weeks prior in which I didn’t use all $30 to borrow a dollar from past-me, just so that I could get Showcase Presents Justice League of America, Vol. 6 (DC Comics, $19.99), which takes the series firmly into the 1970s and brings the team face to face with villains including the Shaggy Man, Amazo and countless other favorites of my childhood.

Should I have some splurging left in me after that nostalgia-fest, I’d likely go for the Judge Anderson: PSI Files, Vol. 3 collection (Rebellion, $32.99), which picks the series up just after I’d dropped off the 2000AD radar for awhile, and hopefully gives me the chance to get back into the character, now that I am firmly into Thrill Power again.

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Previews: What Looks Good for April

It’s time once again for our monthly trip through Previews looking for cool, new comics. We’ve each picked the five comics we’re most anticipating in order to create a list of the best new stuff coming out two months from now.

As usual, please feel free to play along in the comments. Tell us what we missed that you’re looking forward to or – if you’re a comics creator – mention your own stuff.

Crater XV

Graeme McMillan

Crater XV HC (Top Shelf, $19.95): I’ve been following (and loving) the serialization of Kevin Cannon’s follow-up to Far Arden in the digital pages of Double Barrel, but I know that I’ll be picking up this hardcover collection of the further adventures of sea dog Rusty Shanks nonetheless. The Canadian space program deserves no less.

In The Days of the Mob HC (DC Comics, $39.99): To say that Kirby’s 1970s take on the organized-crime world of the 1930s is something I’ve been longing to read since I first discovered its existence would be an understatement, so I’m definitely looking forward to this deluxe reprint, complete with material that wasn’t in the original edition.

Indigo Prime: Anthropocalypse TP (Rebellion/2000AD, $24.99): John Smith’s cosmic authorities are one of comics’ most secret treasures, I think, especially when he’s paired with an artist like Edmund Bagwell, who brings a wonderful Euro-Kirby influence to the stories in this collection. Really looking forward to this one.

Relish: My Life in the Kitchen GN (First Second, $17.99): As a sucker for good autobiographical comics and also good food writing, the idea of Lucy Knisley creating a food-centric memoir — complete with recipes! — is far too good to ignore. I love that publishers like First Second are publishing work like this.

Solo Deluxe Edition HC (DC Comics, $49.99): Even though I own most of these issues from their original appearance, the oversized hardcover format is waaaay too tempting when you consider some of the material this book has up its 500+ page sleeve: Paul Pope covering Kirby! Brendan McCarthy channeling Ditko as only he could! The amazing Darwyn Cooke issue! The only thing that could make this better would be if it included work completed on follow-up issues before the plug had been pulled … But maybe that can appear in a second volume, one day…

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Kieron Gillen on the good, and the terribad, of Young Avengers #1

Terribad?

With Young Avengers #1 on stands for the better part of a week now, writer Kieron Gillen has rolled out a “director’s commentary” of sorts that provides an entertaining and insightful peek behind the scenes of the Marvel series.

For instance, Gillen explains things like his goals for certain scenes, and how artist Jamie McKelvie had to redraw Hulkling’s tentacles, “because they originally looked like big ol’ cocks.” But perhaps most interesting are the defenses he lays out for a couple of criticisms of the issue — one I’d seen pop up online, the other I hadn’t.

The latter is Loki’s use of the portmanteau (it qualifies, yeah?) “terribad” during his confrontation with Miss America. “It’s funny. I got away with the Phone Booth but some people tripped over Terribad, when it’s absolutely IC [in character] for Loki in his mix of bad internet gibberish and old norse,” Gillen writes. “I suspect that’s people who’ve never read any of Kid Loki before. C’est la vie.”

However, it’s his explanation of the double-page title spread following the opening sequence, below, that proves the most engaging (don’t worry, it didn’t eat into the number of story pages).

“It serves a purpose here bar triumphalism,” Gillen writes. “It’s a cold hard break between the opening and the rest of the story – a hard re-set. Lauren did ask about the justification for this seemingly non-related intro, and I explained it to her as a PULP FICTION opening. [...] Essentially, it goes quiet-conversation in the style of the film setting mood, exploding into shouted sweary gun-wielding violence, freeze-frame and hard cut to the black screen with the titles and that Dick Dale Guitar. We don’t come back to the young robbers until way into the film, but it doesn’t matter- its initial purpose is that it explains Pulp Fiction in miniature, right there. And then we go to a much slower paced section which builds, etc. You know what the film is from then on in. That’s what the opening was for. The rest of the book is relatively grounded, but in the opening I give a concentrated portrait of the whole vision. This is what we do.”

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