Lea Hernandez Archives - Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

Comics A.M. | Palestinian cartoonist to be released today

Mohammed Saba'aneh

Mohammed Saba’aneh

Legal | Palestinian cartoonist Mohammed Saba’aneh, who was arrested in March by Israeli authorities and held for what many feared would be an indefinite period, is expected to be released today. [Palestine News Network]

Graphic novels | Aligning itself with the latest trend in education, Diamond Book Distributors has released a list of 98 graphic novels that can fit in with a Common Core curriculum. [Diamond Book Distributors]

Awards | The shortlist has been announced for the Scottish Comic Book Alliance Awards. [Forbidden Planet]

Continue Reading »

Comics A.M. | Scrutinizing Marvel Unlimited and DC Comics apps

Marvel Unlimited

Marvel Unlimited

Digital comics | Although the Marvel Unlimited and DC Comics apps work very differently, Noel Murray has similar complaints about both: Specific titles are difficult to find, and the damn things keep crashing: “Frankly, while some of the other major comics apps have better search functions — Dark Horse’s, for example — none of the big companies have created the digital comics retailing equivalent of an Amazon or iTunes.” [Hero Complex]

Publishing | Drawn & Quarterly has announced its fall lineup, which includes Peter Bagge’s biography Woman Rebel: The Margaret Sanger Story. [Drawn & Quarterly]

Continue Reading »

Comics A.M. | New York mother upset by Chick tract on doorstep

Happy Hour

Comics | After all of these years, the evangelical comics of 88-year-old cartoonist and publisher Jack Chick still stir controversy. The latest is in Buffalo, New York, where a mother is upset that a local church left on her doorstep a Chick tract that was read by her 7-year-old daughter. “It seems like a Lifetime movie or something that was put into a kid’s comic book and expose my 7-year-old to this horrible of an idea of a family life,” Brandi Gillette says. Titled “Happy Hour,” the 2002 comic depicts an alcoholic, abusive father whose wife dies following a beating (while he’s bellied up to the bar). When his two children start to go hungry because he’s spending the family’s money on alcohol, the girl smashes his liquor bottles and, after threatening to cut him with the jagged glass, convinces him to go to church, where he devotes his life to Christ. Chick Publications, which publishes the tract, says “Happy Hour” is intended for adults, not children. [WIVB]

Continue Reading »

Comics A.M. | This weekend, it’s HeroesCon; civil liberties group defends The Oatmeal creator

HeroesCon

Conventions | Creative director Rico Renzi discusses HeroesCon, which celebrates its 30th anniversary this weekend with a three-day event that’s experienced a spike in advance ticket sales: “Stan Lee’s attendance to this year’s show has definitely caused a spike in advance ticket sales from what I can tell. I honestly like the show at just the size it is; it’s just right. I used to hop on a bus from Baltimore to go the NYCC and I loved it for the first couple years. It just got too big for me too enjoy it, you couldn’t walk around without rubbing up against strangers. It’s a great alternative to San Diego now I guess. If you’re looking for a pure comic book show though, HeroesCon is where it’s at.” In addition to Lee, this year’s guests include Neal Adams, Mark Bagley, Cliff Chiang, Frank Cho, Becky Cloonan, Geof Darrow, Kelly Sue DeConnick, Evan Dorkin, Tommy Lee Edwards, Matt Fraction, Francesco Francavilla, Jaime Hernandez, Dave Johnson, Jeff Lemire, Paul Levitz, Mike Mignola, George Perez, Louise Simonson, Walt Simonson, Scott Snyder and Bernie Wrightson. [The Comics Reporter]

Continue Reading »

Point-counterpoint: What is Kickstarter for, anyway?

Johanna Draper Carlson has a thoughtful post about the appropriate use of Kickstarter, and uses Lea Hernandez’s Kickstarter for The Garlicks as an example of a campaign she’s not comfortable with, because the comic doesn’t exist yet:

I am more comfortable funding a project where the work already exists, one where the creator needs print costs. This doesn’t apply to Lea’s case, but one of the reasons why is that, if rewards deliver within a couple of months, I’m protected if something happens and I don’t get what’s promised. Within 3-6 months, I have the ability to do a credit card chargeback in the worst case, if the provider flakes out. On a more personal level, it’s more rewarding to get a book or other rewards within a couple of months, as though it was similar to a preorder. Otherwise, it feels like throwing money into the wind.

In Johanna’s case, it’s a matter of not wanting to invest in something that isn’t substantially complete — because she wants to be sure she gets what she paid for. In the comments, though, it turns to a more general discussion of whether it’s appropriate to use a Kickstarter to support the artist while she is working on the project. Hernandez points out that her Kickstarter includes printing and production costs and a modest page rate paid directly to her for doing the work:

Continue Reading »

Kurt Busiek will eat a bug if you back Lea Hernandez’s Kickstarter

Lea Hernandez, creator of Cathedral Child and Rumble Girls, has a Kickstarter that looks pretty nice: It’s The Garlicks, a charming, kid-friendly tale of a vampire family — Pandora, a tween-age girl who doesn’t seem to have any vampire powers; her kid sister Pamila, who has super-cute vampire powers; her mother, a butcher (kid-friendly vampires eat pork, not blood); and her father, a flower-eating barista.

Aside from the cuteness, The Garlicks is allowing Hernandez to stretch artistically in a couple of different directions; in an interview at Yet Another Comics Blog, she talks about her new use of color, saying “My good friend Adam Warren (Empowered) kept telling me my color work was stronger than my b&w/limited palette/pencils, going back to my story for Comic Book Tattoo, until I took the plunge. He was right, and I’ve had so much pleasure in working in color.”

Hernandez has obviously put a lot of thought into this comic, and the art is fantastic. However, she also set a very ambitious Kickstarter goal of $40,000, and she has to raise more than half of that by Thursday afternoon. So Kurt Busiek jumped in to help: He promised on Twitter that he would eat a bug if people support the Kickstarter. Actually, he promised to claim to eat a bug, and at the moment, he’s just eating the bug in a nice little print that Hernandez is including as a extra. At some pledge levels she will draw a custom sketch of Kurt enjoying his little snack. But there is a possibility that Busiek will eat a real bug; at the Kickstarter page, Hernandez writes, “There’s even a possibility of Kurt eating a REAL bug, if the price is Right. (The right price is probably $3,000., the right place at Emerald City Comic-Con.)”

Some highlights from 24-Hour Comics Day 2011

Lea Hernandez's 24-hour comic

This past Sunday was 24-Hour Comics Day, a grand old comics tradition that began in 1990 when Scott McCloud challenged his friend Steve Bissette to draw an entire 24-page comic in a single day. Scott has posted the whole story, including the first 24-hour comics, on his blog. The idea loped along for a while until 2004, when writer and publisher Nat Gertler came up with the idea of making it a Thing, with coordinated events and people posting on the internet and so forth. And now it even has its own Twitter hashtag. What a long way we have come!

I looked through a lot of blog posts while compiling this, and one thing I noticed was the number of people who felt their comics failed, or who didn’t complete the challenge. I think the value of 24-Hour Comics, especially for newcomers, is that it allows the creator to start something and bring it to a close within a defined period. Starting things is easy, but finishing them is hard, and even finishing a bad comic is better than starting a lot of good ones and never bringing them to a close.

Tom Spurgeon is compiling the definitive, exhaustive collection of links, and what I see from his list and the people linked at the official 24-Hour Comics Day site is that very few well-known creators took the challenge this year; the flip side of that is that there are a lot of ambitious newcomers who gave it a shot.

On the other hand, there were a few veteran creators, including Lea Hernandez, whose comic was super-cute and very colorful, although a bit lacking in storyline …

Continue Reading »


Browse the Robot 6 Archives