marble Season Archives - Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

A Month of Wednesdays | ‘Unico,’ ‘Marble Season’ and more

letting it goLetting It Go (Drawn and Quarterly): When we last saw Miriam Katin, it was in the pages of her We Are On Our Own, her 2006 graphic memoir about how she and her mother survived the Holocaust, hiding out from the Nazis in the Hungarian countryside. Her new memoir continues that story, by skipping ahead to her current life as a middle-aged artist living in New York City and harboring the deep and bitter prejudices against a city, a country and a people that her childhood understandable instilled in her.

The subject matter is awfully heavy, but it’s presented quite lightly — this is a fun, funny comic about a grown woman coming to terms with the irrational prejudices and bias born of the irrational prejudice and biases of others.

When we meet the Miriam of Letting It Go, she and her husband are seemingly living an idyllic artistic life, he in a room playing his clarinet, she procrastinating starting to draw something. When her grown son says he wants to move to Berlin, she reacts negatively instinctively, and gradually comes to terms with it, visiting him in Berlin, and then returning a second time almost immediately in order to see some of her art hanging at a show there, learning the word vergangenheitsbewältigung (coming to terms with the past) and how to start doing it … if not how to pronounce it.

Katin’s graphic novel is border-less, the “panels” implied ones formed by the consecutive, often overlapping images, giving the artwork a winding, rhythmic flow that moves over the pages like water. That and the somewhat-sketchy nature of the art, in which you can see each and every line that goes into the drawings, gives the book an incredibly intimate feel, as if a reader has simply discovered Katin’s sketchbook, rather than something mass-produced.

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Gilbert Hernandez’s ‘Marble Season’ evokes childhood pleasures

Marble Season

Marble Season

What is it about childhood that makes us forget about ours so easily? Whether consciously or not, we seem all too eager to not only put our younger years behind us, but obliterate them from our memories. Even as parents we frequently grow exasperated and angry with our own children, seemingly incapable of remembering what it was like to be little.

While many cartoonists are cited for their “childlike” abilities, precious few are able to accurately convey what it actually feels like to be a child – what makes up  the significant joys and anxieties of your average 12- or 6- or 3-year-old and how they best express those complicated emotions.

There are a few, however. Lynda Barry is one, Kazuo Umezu is another. Add to that short list Gilbert Hernandez, as evidenced by his latest book, the excellent Marble Season.

It’s the episodic story of Huey, a the middle child of a moderately sized family living in California in the mid-1960s. His adventures, such as they are, consist of avoiding scary things, like neighborhood bullies or the crazy lady in the spooky house down the road; discovering cool stuff, like Mars Attacks cards; and inventing and playing games with the kids in the neighborhood. Taking a page from Peanuts, we never see Huey’s parents or any of his teachers (indeed we never see him in a classroom). The entire book is staged and presented from the viewpoint of Huey, his brothers and their friends.

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Cheat Sheet | From ‘Jupiter’s Legacy’ to Stumptown Comics Fest

cheat sheet-april22 copy

Welcome to “Cheat Sheet,” ROBOT 6′s guide to the week ahead. This weekend, the focus turns on the creators — both established and newcomers — with the School of Visual Arts’ Illustration & Cartooning Department’s Fresh Meat exhibition in New York City and Stumptown Comics Fest is Portland, Oregon.

Meanwhile, our contributors select their picks for the best comics going on sale Wednesday, including Jupiter’s Legacy #1, Vader’s Little Princess and Morning Glories #26.

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Comics A.M. | The Walking Dead reasserts bookstore dominance

The Walking Dead Compendium Book One

The Walking Dead Compendium Book One

Graphic novels | Two volumes of The Walking Dead Compendium topped BookScan’s list of the Top 20 graphic novels sold in bookstores in March, and Vol. 60 of Naruto was No. 3, but ICv2 thinks the new Avatar: The Next Airbender graphic novel premiering at No. 4 is headline-worthy. [ICv2]

Awards | With his duties complete, Charles Hatfield describes what it was like to be an Eisner judge. [See Hatfield]

Creators | Gilbert Hernandez talks about his childhood and that influences, from Dennis the Menace to Steve Ditko, that shaped his latest graphic novel, Marble Season. [The Chicago Tribune]

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Comics A.M. | Comparing Image’s worldwide pre-orders and U.S. sales

Image Comics

Image Comics

Publishing | Image Comics provided the retail news and analysis website ICv2 with worldwide pre-order figures for 15 of its March titles, allowing for comparison with estimates of Diamond Comic Distributors sales to U.S. direct market stores. [ICv2.com]

Creators | Mark Waid pens a tribute to the late Carmine Infantino. [Hero Complex]

Creators | Gilbert Hernandez distinguishes between autobiography and art in his new graphic novel, Marble Season, which takes on a 1960s suburban childhood not unlike his own. [Chicago Reader]

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