Marguerite Bennett Archives - Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

Ben Oliver and little Lobo respond to redesign uproar: ‘Wah’

lobo-wah-cropped

Just when it seemed the debate had cooled surrounding Lobo’s “new look,” Frank Cho stepped into the fray with a classic interpretation of the character, accompanied by a word balloon that read, “Who’s the ass that changed the costume and made me look like a ponce?”

Now Ben Oliver, who drew Justice League #23.3: Lobo, has poked back with an illustration of his own, sporting just one word: “Wah.”

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Crisis on Earth-3D!: Villains Month, Week Two

villains

DC Comics kicked off its Villains Month last week, as the evil opposites of the Justice League invaded the DC Universe, seemingly disposing of all the heroes and taking over the world.

Likewise, the villains have been taking over DC’s New 52 line of comic books, with the MIA heroes finding the covers of their books occupied by bad guys. Those are, of course, the collectible and somewhat-controversial (among retailers) 3D lenticular covers.

But as the case with books, we shouldn’t judge a comic by its cover, so let’s continue reviewing our way through the contents of the Villains Month issues. As with last week’s batch, I’m rating each book on a 10-point scale of how evil it is, with “Not Very Good” being the worst and “Absolute Evil” the best, and noting its connectivity to the Forever Evil crossover event that sparked the promotion in the first place.

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Annual report: Reviews of DC’s 2013 summer annuals

annuals

The comic book annual has, in recent years, become an endangered species. Once an oversized, extra-length dose of the characters and concepts a reader could count on appearing once a year (or, you know, annually), the changing funny-book landscape has made them a less appealing proposition.

The rise of the graphic novel and trade paperback collections made “novel-length” adventures appearing in actual, off-the-rack comic books somewhat obsolete. The rising price of comics helped make annuals seem less practical; if a 20- or 22-page comic costs $2.99 or $3.99, a 48- or 56- or 64-page one would be prohibitively expensive. And with the shrunken market, it doesn’t make sense for a publisher to release an additional, extra-long issue of almost every title in its line.

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