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The Fifth Color | Forward into the past with Marvel in October

New Avengers #20

Look out! Another event is on it’s way!

With the recent announcements about Inhumanity, the aftermath “banner” title of Infinity, doesn’t it seem like things are moving a little fast toward October? Sure, we always get our solicitations three months in advance, and yeah, that’s going to lead to a little future thinking on books that haven’t even started (or debuted in some cases), but Infinity looks dense. If it’s anything like Jonathan Hickman’s current Avengers stories, I feel like I’m going to need a road map or just some CliffNotes to get through this upcoming epic and here we are, already talking about what’s to come after. It can certainly be overwhelming.

October is a month of change at Marvel, so join us as we look into the October Solicitations and see just how much of this change we should hate and fear! Onward, brave Marvelites!

I wasn’t exaggerating about that month of change thing, or maybe the solicits are, because that seem to be a theme throughout several books. We start off with INFINITY #4 and #5 (of 6), the penultimate chapters of this six-part cosmic extravaganza. We’ll be “negotiating the fall of worlds” and “the war for Earth begins” respectively, making me wonder that if the war for Earth starts here, what in heaven’s name have we been doing up to this point? One more issue to go and the war starts now?

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Logan howls in trailer for ‘Wolverine: Origin’ motion comic

wolverine-origin

Shout! Factory has debuted the trailer for Marvel Knights Animation’s Wolverine: Origin, the motion-comic adaptation of the 2001-2002 limited series that, as the title suggests, revealed the early years of the ubiquitous Marvel mutant. It was written by Paul Jenkins from a story by Jenkins, Joe Quesada and Bill Jemas, and illustrated by Andy Kubert and Richard Isanove.

Wolverine: Origin is the ninth title produced by Shout! Factory since 2009, joining the likes of Inhumans, Spider-Woman: Agent of S.W.O.R.D., Iron Man: Extremis, Black Panther and, most recently, Astonishing X-Men: Unstoppable. It will be available on DVD beginning July 9 for $14.97.

The timing of the release couldn’t be better, considering that director James Mangold’s The Wolverine premieres July 26.

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Paul Jenkins and Jae Lee’s Inhumans getting motion-comic treatment

Marvel Knights Animation will expand its lineup of motion comics in April with an adaptation of Inhumans, the 1998-99 series by Paul Jenkins and Jae Lee.

It will be the eighth title produced by Shout! Factory since 2009, joining the likes of Spider-Woman: Agent of S.W.O.R.D., Iron Man: Extremis, Black Panther and, most recently, Astonishing X-Men: Unstoppable. The Inhumans DVD will be available beginning April 23 for $14.97.

Debuting in November 1998, the Eisner Award-winning series follows the race of genetic outsiders as Black Bolt and the rest of the Royal Family attempt to repel attacks on their island kingdom of Attilan from without and within. Inhumans ran for just 12 issues.

While a 15-year-old series — rather than, say, something from the Avengers or Iron Man stables — may seem an unusual choice to receive the motion-comic treatment, it’s probably worth noting that Marvel Studios is gearing up for Phase Three of its cinematic universe, one that will include some of the company’s more offbeat properties, like Ant-Man and Doctor Strange. An Inhumans movie was confirmed in October 2011 as part of the studio’s agenda, and the third phase that begins in 2015 seems as likely a home for the project as any.

See the official synopsis for Marvel Knights Animation’s Inhumans below:

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Talking Comics with Tim | Jimmy Palmiotti

Trailblazer

Anytime I get to talk to Jimmy Palmiotti, we never lack for projects to discuss. I can’t prove it, but I am willing to bet Palmiotti came up with at least two new story ideas while in the midst of this email interview. This Wednesday, July 6, marks the release of Trailblazer, a 48-page full-color western science fiction comic book ($5.99 [Image]) that he co-wrote with Justin Gray and art by Jim Daly. As detailed in this recent CBR release coverage, Trailblazer is “about a hired killer who turns in evidence against an employer for the murder of the woman who raised him. The government must then shield their star informant by enacting Operation Trailblazer, a witness protection program that uses not only location but time travel as well in order to keep their charges safe. As the assassin adjusts to his new life in the old west, he soon finds that no matter when or where he is the future is dead set in coming back to haunt him.” If you buy the book via Comixology, the original script is included as a bonus.

Before discussing this new Image release, we talked a bit about the impressive Jonah Hex 70-issue run (please note, for more scoop on Palmiotti and Gray’s plans for the new All-Star Western series be sure to read CBR’s Jeffrey Renaud’s recent interview with the creators)–not to jump the gun though, as issue 69 goes on sale this Wednesday (with art by Jeff Lemire). Also our discussion delves into the Palmiotti/Gray team reuniting with artist Joseph Michael Linsner on the Claws II (a sequel to Marvel’s Black Cat/Wolverine 2006 team-up) miniseries, which amazingly enough also goes on sale this Wednesday (check out the CBR preview of the first issue). Go into a comic book store this Wednesday, and bottom line, you will have your pick of Palmiotti product to buy. Palmiotti’s passion for comics and his equal commitment to meeting deadlines are two things I’ve always admired about him and that shine through in this interview. As you’ll read at the end of the interview, Palmiotti is curious to know what characters fans would like to see him work on, so please be sure to let him know in the comments section.

Tim O’Shea: You and Jonah Hex have a heck of a future together (with All-Star Western), no doubt. But I really want to talk about how amazing it was that you and Justin successfully told Jonah Hex for 70 issues. How proud are you of that accomplishment?

Jimmy Palmiotti: Very proud…and proud of the excellent work of so many amazing artists along the way. Justin and I would celebrate each and every year we were on Jonah , thinking at any minute it could be the last, but the great crew at D.C. comics always believed in us and believed in our choices and seventy issues is a huge milestone. They believed in us so much that with the new 52 books, they let us continue too do what we do best. In our minds, issue one of All Star Western is another chapter in the characters life and we haven’t missed a beat. The good news is that we are going to have a lot of fun with the other western characters in the D.C. universe.

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Talking Comics with Tim | Stuart Moore, Part I

Namor: The First Mutant

Namor: The First Mutant #1

Stuart Moore is a writer I’ve known and interviewed for a number of years. In the past, we’ve typically focused on near-term/upcoming project discussions in our interviews. But more recently, for nearly a year, he and I have been working on a series of email interviews trying to cover the scope of his career to date. This process started in mid-2009. Moore and I realized earlier this summer it would be best to get this interview finalized on the eve of Namor: The First Mutant 1’s release (which comes out from Marvel this Wednesday, August 25) . My thanks to Stuart for his time and patience on this fun and hopefully thorough examination of his work. The first installment of this two-part interview will focus upon his work as an editor. Tomorrow, in our second part, we will focus on his freelance writing. (My thanks also to fellow Robot 6er Tom Bondurant for giving me some feedback on the early stages of this interview and suggesting a question of his own.)

Tim O’Shea: You got your start at St. Martin’s Press, back in the mid-1980s, how did you get that job?

Stuart Moore: I graduated from college, not sure of what I wanted to do. Spent the summer in California, then came back east and started looking for a job. Book publishing at that point was very partial to Ivy League graduates — probably still is — so I got the referral through Princeton’s career services center. I worked for about 2 ½ years as assistant to a brilliant woman who edited craft guides, child care titles, and etiquette books. It wasn’t exactly my field, but to this day I still know that you say “Congratulations” to a groom and “Best wishes” to the bride.

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