Marvel Archives - Page 3 of 141 - Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

Kris Anka cuts loose with amazing Captain America illustration

header

Kris Anka stays pretty busy as one of the regular rotating artists of Uncanny X-Men, but you want to see him take a spin on another of Marvel’s marquee franchises, look no further than his depiction of the Sentinel of Liberty and his supporting cast from Captain America: The Winter Soldier.

Although Anka debuted the artwork only last week on his blog, it was produced a few years ago and never released. He explained it was intended to accompany Sideshow Collectibles’ Captain America Premium Format statue, but it wasn’t approved in time to be included in the packaging.

Continue Reading »

Howard the Duck gets POP! vinyl bobblehead

howard-the-duck-pop-vinyl

In the wake of Funko’s adorable “Dancing Groot” POP! vinyl bobblehead toy, inspired by Guardians of the Galaxy, another somewhat obscure Marvel character is about to get a POP! treatment of his own. As revealed this afternoon on Twitter by Marvel’s Ryan Penagos, Howard the Duck will make his POP! vinyl debut later this year. While the release date isn’t available, it’s likely Funko will reveals details later this week, along with more information on Dancing Groot.

Continue Reading »

Comics A.M. | At Dubai con, women artists outnumbered men

A cosplayer at the Middle East Film & Comic Con

A cosplayer at the Middle East Film & Comic Con

Conventions | Vocativ put together an interesting, if somewhat late, video report about the Middle East Film & Comic Con in Dubai, often viewed by Westerners as a conservative Muslim city. Yet the April convention, which drew about 35,000 attendees, featured both women in traditional hijabs and cosplayers in somewhat-revealing costumes. More interesting still, the number of women artists outnumbered the men. The piece also touches upon the reaction to the new Ms. Marvel, a Muslim teenager from New Jersey. [Vocativ]

Creators | “Never having known how to work in this style, suddenly in my 80s, I discover I can”: Jules Feiffer talks about his latest graphic novel, Kill My Mother, a noir-ish tale that is a sharp departure from his earlier work. [Los Angeles Times]

Continue Reading »

The Fifth Color | ‘New Avengers’ finally gets to fireworks factory

New Avengers vol. 3 #6

cool guys don’t look at explosions

Jonathan Hickman writes a dense story. I’d almost consider him the anti-Bendis in the matter/anti-matter chamber that is the Avengers. While Brian Michael Bendis focused on the small story (sometimes a bit myopically), Hickman branches out into the vast unknowns of space and reality, and presents stories in a massive scope and scale. He has complex, overarching plots that have enormous charts to keep track of timelines and major events. He creates mythologies for his own subcultures for readers to delve into. The threats his Avengers face are beyond the realms of mortal ken, which sometimes means beyond the reader’s ken as well.

Don’t get me wrong, I think it’s great that the Avengers are facing down greater problems and dangers than, say, ninjas or hoodlums. If you’re going to be the premier superhero team, you have to be challenged by something no one hero could face on her own. Giving the Avengers  grand designs makes them seem more important and, therefore, more heroic when they succeed. On the other hand, sometimes a larger scope can be too large to grasp, and when the reader loses the personal interest of the story, it can be a chore to slog through. I’d be lying if it didn’t seem like homework sometimes to figure out Hickman’s builder/mapmakers/Ivory Kings/Black Priests cosmology, and that my eyes didn’t glaze over during some issues as I waited for the heroes to do something spectacular.

Well, the wait is over! The last three issues of New Avengers have gotten us back into the game with a huge reveal, some personal triumphs and tragedies, and I feel more invested in this Incursion story than ever before. What’s been going on? And why did it take so long to get to the fireworks factory? Read on!

WARNING: Spoilers (obviously) for the New Avengers #21-23.

Continue Reading »

How your favorite Marvel heroes measure up, in one handy chart

marvel heroes heigh-cropped

Often the infographics peddled by companies to websites aren’t that interesting or well-done, but I’ll have to hand it to HalloweenCostumes.com and, more so, artist Kate Willaert: While opinions may vary on how interesting the Marvel Heroes Height Comparison Chart is, the art is certainly nice — and it’s sprinkled with a little humor.

They’re pretty savvy, too, as they not only include the Guardians of the Galaxy, but also Howard the Duck and Ant-Man. So now, the next time you’re involved in a bar wager that rests on who’s taller, Captain America or Hawkeye, you’ll have a quick-and-easy answer.

Continue Reading »

Comics A.M. | Chinese cartoonist fears returning home

A cartoon by Biantai Lajiao

A cartoon by Biantai Lajiao

Political cartoons | “I think it might be pretty risky to go back home,” says Chinese cartoonist Wang Liming, who’s on Japan in a business trip and is thinking about staying there. “If I go back, they might use my cartoons as an excuse to detain me.” Liming, whose pen name is Biantai Lajiao (Perverted Chili Pepper), was arrested and briefly detained in 2013 on charges of “rumor-mongering,” stemming from a post on the microblog site Weibo. This time, an anonymous commenter on a state-owned discussion board called Liming a “traitor” because of a cartoon he posted online that showed mainland Chinese being sent to Hong Kong to oppose the Occupy Central pro-democracy campaign and demonstrate how to kowtow to the government. “That post is written like something out of the Cultural Revolution,” Liming said, calling it a “smear campaign.” He has 500,000 followers on Weibo and another 340,000 on Sina Weibo, and he says he is losing income because his accounts have been shut down. [Radio Free Asia]

Continue Reading »

Curse of the B-listers, or what went wrong with the New Warriors

NewWarriors12

New Warriors #12

Marvel released its November solicitations, and as I’ve feared for a few months now, New Warriors by Christopher Yost and Marcus To is ending with Issue 12. This isn’t exactly a surprise, as anyone even casually watching its sales probably saw this coming: July’s Issue 7 sold about 17,000 copies, a few thousand below the traditional line of death for a Marvel title.

While the writing may have been on the wall, it’s sad to see such a fun and spirited comic go away. As a longtime fan of New Warriors, this fourth attempt to revitalize the property was the most true to the fondly remembered original series by Fabian Nicieza, Mark Bagley and Darick Robertson. The bright and energetic art was fantastic, the dialogue was pitch-perfect, and yet … it just didn’t click with enough readers.

So what’s the problem?

Unfortunately, the creators had an uphill climb for a number of reasons. Some are unique to the New Warriors and others are shared by non-marquee properties at Marvel, DC and other publishers. In February, when this New Warriors series launched, I celebrated the B-list characters and their comics. Now six months later, we’re staring down the barrel of cancellation. These B-listers are a double-edged sword, so now it’s time to look at the edge of the sword that we don’t like (or however that metaphor works).

Continue Reading »

‘Doomed!’ goes behind the scenes of Corman’s ‘Fantastic Four’

doomed

As comics fans continue to grumble about casting and rumored plot details, and predict box-office doom for director Josh Trank’s Fantastic Four, filmmaker Marty Langford takes us back 20 years with a sneak peek at his documentary Doomed! The Untold Story of Roger Corman’s The Fantastic Four.

Even if you haven’t picked up a DVD bootleg at a convention, you’re undoubtedly familiar with the legend of the 1994 film, shot over 28 days for a meager $1 million so producer Bernd Eichinger could retain the film rights to the Marvel Comics property. Featuring low production values and high levels of camp, The Fantastic Four was never released in theaters, and many — including Stan Lee — have long contended it was never intended for distribution. However, Eichinger, Corman and others involved tell a different story.

Continue Reading »

Stanford biologist explores science of Captain America, Hulk

stanford-hulk

As much as I enjoyed my well-worn copies of The Official Handbook of the Marvel Universe, the often-strained pseudoscientific explanations for superhuman abilities sure could sap the fun of out comics. For instance, the Hulk wasn’t simply (!) a gamma-irradiated man who turned big, green and strong when he got angry — if I remember correctly, his additional mass came from another dimension. In an amusing contrast, the “Powers & Abilities” section of a Handbook entry could go on for paragraphs, even pages, while in Who’s Who in the DC Universe, it might only rate a sentence or two.

Stanford researcher Sebastian Alvarado manages to find a nice middle ground in a pair of videos exploring the science behind Captain America and the Incredible Hulk. There’s no mention of other dimensions or unstable molecules here, but there are some big, and impressive-sounding words — such us epigenetic modification, which Alvarado theorizes might be behind Bruce Banner’s transformations.

Continue Reading »

Saturday Shelf Porn | Maximum Marvel mini busts, part 2

sp-900

Hello and welcome to Shelf Porn, our weekly look at one fan’s collection. Today we’re featuring a return engagement to the home of Chad Holloway in Wisconsin, who tells us that since the last time we featured his shelves, “my collection has changed dramatically and is now more prominently displayed.”

If you’d like to see your collection featured here, you can find instructions at the end of this post.

And now here is Chad …

Continue Reading »

The Fifth Color | The ever-evolving face of the Hulk

hulk5_varcvrThe problem is that heroes win. Episodic storytelling can only get away with formula for a short amount of time before something has to change, and if there’s one constant to mainstream comics, it’s that the heroes should win. Maybe not all the time, but eventually.

When heroes lose, it bums us out. I’m not saying comics called “Magneto” or “Sabretooth” don’t sell well, it’s just they’re not going to sell as well as one labeled “Wolverine.” As readers, we come to see our heroes face a peril they will eventually overcome. Marvel’s Civil War and Dark Reign were great examples of the heroes ostensibly losing the battle, but in time (and a couple of other events later) they would win the war.

With every success our heroes experience, a greater challenge should be on the horizon. No one wants to see Spider-Man fight street-level criminals forever; let’s take him into space! Or put him with the Avengers! And so the stakes rise higher and higher with every foe defeated. Instead of having heroes face bigger and bigger catastrophes — Earth can only be in peril in so times each week — there has to be a different kind of challenge to keep our heroes on their toes and readers on the edge of their seats. So, we change the hero; maybe it’s some new powers, maybe it’s a new supporting cast, maybe we go facelift, costume change or new personality.

Take The Superior Spider-Man: Pretty much all of the above were thrown at Spider-Man to give the character a new look, new cast and new outlook. Stories began focusing less on if Spider-Man was going to win and more on how he was going to do it with Doctor Octopus in control. And because books with Doctor Octopus’ name on the cover won’t likely sell as well as those with Spider-Man’s, there’s little risk in making the switch for a while to see if it shakes things up. The old status quo eventually returns, and everyone feels like they got a little vacation.

Probably the best example of the personal shake-up is the Hulk. He’s somewhat of a cottage industry of protagonists in himself. He has tons of supporting characters, and some of the most important ones to the Hulk mythology are those in his own head.

WARNING: Some talk of Hulk #6, so please grab a copy and read along!

Continue Reading »

This Iron Man Hulkbuster Armor cosplay is pretty amazing

hulkbuster-cropped

Well before Iron Man’s Hulkbuster Armor makes its big-screen debut next year in Marvel’s Avengers: Age of Ultron, cosplayer Pablo Bairan has brought the comic-book version to life, quite epically.

And as difficult as it is to believe, the massive suit is mobile, with an honest-to-goodness person in side. You can see for yourself in the photos and video below.

Continue Reading »

Tickets are already on sale for D23 Expo 2015

d23 expo

If it seems far too soon, and far too exhausting, to start planning for Comic-Con International 2015 (it’s just330 days away) then think about this: Early-bird tickets went on sale Thursday for D23 Expo 2015, scheduled for about a month after the San Diego convention.

Billed as the Ultimate Disney Fan Event, it will be held Aug. 14-16, 2015, at the Anaheim Convention Center, across the street from Disneyland. It brings together elements of Disney, Pixar, ABC, Lucasfilm and Marvel under one (figurative) tent.

Continue Reading »

‘Storms of Carnage’ fan film unleashes the Black Panther

storms of carnage

While we’ve certainly seen a number of fan films featuring Superman, Judd Dredd and the Bat-family (the Dark Knight, Batgirl, Nightwing, the Gotham villains, etc.), I think this is the first one I’ve seen starring Black Panther.

The brainchild of D.A. Jackson, who wrote, directed and starred, Storms of Carnage: The Black Panther Unleashed is an extremely violent — as “Storms of Carnage” may suggest — “real-world” take on the Marvel character that’s part political/crime thriller, part no-holds-barred martial-arts film. (Seriously, the last half isn’t safe for work, or possibly for the squeamish.)

Continue Reading »

This fan-made Dancing Baby Groot is all you want, all you need

baby-groot

Disney Consumer Products struck deals with more than 50 companies for Guardians of the Galaxy merchandise, ensuring store shelves are stocked with everything from a Big Blastin’ Rocket Raccoon Figure to the LEGO Milano Spaceship Rescue Building Set to the Rocket Raccoon Suit-Up Backpack.

But somehow, nobody thought to license — spoiler alert? — a dancing Baby Groot.

Continue Reading »


Browse the Robot 6 Archives