Matt Fraction Archives - Page 2 of 10 - Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

Fraction, Zdarsky get meta with ‘Sex Criminals’ #1 fourth printing

sex-criminals1-fourth-cropp

Normally, photo covers are pretty boring and easy to pass by, but Matt Fraction and Chip Zdarsky’s Olan Mills-style portrait for the fourth printing Sex Criminals #1  is … well, indescribably awesome. Unveiled this morning by Image Comics, the cover features Fraction with his hands on Zdarsky’s shoulders while the latter cradles first-printing copy of Sex Criminals #1. The entire image is delightfully awkward, with both gazing vacantly into the distance.

And then there’s the timely blurb at the top, which references Fraction’s recent amicable departure from Marvel’s upcoming series Inhuman.

While I won’t go so far to say it’s the first time creators’ photos have been used for cover, it’s certainly a rare occurrence, and undoubtedly one of the most creative uses of a multiple-printing variant. Also, it should absolutely become tradition that any fourth printing of a comic breaks the fourth wall.

Continue Reading »

Matt Fraction’s full timeline breakdown of ‘Hawkeye’ #8-13

fractionhawkeyemap

Reading Hawkeye month to month instead of in trade is an awesome experience, but it can sometimes be rather confusing for readers, especially in the most recent arc in which Matt Fraction played a bit with the timing of each issue. It was only during the recent Hawkeye #13 that the full timeline of events came to light, and now Fraction has posted his outline for the full arc on his blog.

Fraction’s photo shows 28 index cards with timestamps, issue numbers and brief description of events from Thursday at 8 p.m. to Wednesday evening in an almost-hourly breakdown of plot. The descriptions make perfect sense once you figure out Fraction’s code (“C” means Clint, “K” means Kate most of the time, “B” means Barney, “L” is Lucky the Pizza Dog.), and it’s certainly a cool insight into the most recent arc and Fraction’s process.

Continue Reading »

Read Matt Fraction’s heartfelt response to a fan considering suicide

Matt Fraction

Matt Fraction

Matt Fraction’s blog is always a fascinating read. In between the photos of Hawkeye cosplayers, comic art and pop-culture artifacts, the writer answers questions from fans with a refreshing, and frequently surprising, candor. But none has been as honest, as moving or as vital as his response to a reader’s question about depression, and suicide as a possible “alternative.”

After advising the fan to “seek professional help immediately,” Fraction reveals his own brush with suicide on a Thanksgiving night when he was still in high school.

“As I started to cut, as the corner touched my skin and that jolt of pain fired into my head, I stopped and thought — y’know, last chance. Are you SURE?” he writes. “And I was tired. I sounded like you, that I knew there’d be ups again and downs but I was just so fucking TIRED I couldn’t stand the thought of having to get there. I felt this … this never-ending crush of days that were grey and tepid but for some reason i was supposed to greet each one with a smile. the constant pressure of having to keep my shit in all the time was just exhausting.

Continue Reading »

The criminally funny record of ‘Sex Criminals’ artist Chip Zdarsky

8006515539_e13124c273_o

When Matt Fraction’s Sex Criminals debuts next week from Image Comics, some readers will be exposed to Chip Zdarsky for the first time. And I tell you, it’ll be an unforgettable experience.

Zdarsky may be virtually unknown to devotees of mainstream comics, but for the people of Toronto and those in certain corners of the Internet, he’s a bit of a phenomenon. I was introduced to his work around 2003 through a collected edition of his comic strip Prison Funnies, and then through discussions on the Warren Ellis Forum. He was one of the early members of the web collective Act-I-Vate, contributing a short-lived but legendary series called Zdarsky-verse, which included a drug-fueled Pac-Man.

Continue Reading »

‘It is profoundly important to my entire creative process’

Sex Criminals #3

Sex Criminals #3

“I can’t, and wouldn’t dare, speak for anyone other than me: It’s vital. It’s essential. It is profoundly important to my entire creative process. Aside from pride of ownership, I just start to get antsy and itchy and bored writing the same genre again and again. The greatest concern I have is that the writing will read antsy and itchy and boring. Getting away from the superhero mainstream from time to time to do anything — Casanova, Satellite Sam, Sex Criminals — tends to keep me energized and excited.”

Matt Fraction, on the importance of doing creator-owned comics in addition to his work at Marvel

Comics A.M. | ‘Beetle Bailey’ creator Mort Walker turns 90

Beetle Bailey

Beetle Bailey

Creators | Beetle Bailey creator Mort Walker received messages from the likes of New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, Dolly Parton and Prince Albert II of Monaco ahead of his 90th birthday today. The cartoonist, who introduced Beetle Bailey in 1950, still supervises daily work on the strip at his Stamford, Connecticut, studio. [The Associated Press]

Creators | Gene Luen Yang discusses his newest work, Boxers and Saints, a 500-page, two-volume set that examines China’s Boxer Rebellion through the eyes of two very different characters. [Graphic Novel Reporter]

Continue Reading »

‘If you’re going to do a comic, it should be a comic’

sex criminals

“It just felt right. There’s never been, that I can think of, like a sex comedy for comics the way that we go see sex comedies in the movies or on TV. It just seemed like a genre that was totally virgin — pardon the pun. And I love that stuff, whether it’s like Billy Wilder or Superbad or any of that stuff. It’s a genre I enjoy; it makes me laugh. And if you’re going to do a comic, it should be a comic. It shouldn’t be a screenplay that you just give up and convert to the page. So I wanted something that looked visually spectacular and kind of play with the form. Comics does time on the page very well. It’s a chance to make a piece of cartooning and a piece of comic bookery that ordinarily wouldn’t be possible.”

Matt Fraction, discussing Sex Criminals, his upcoming Image Comics collaboration with Chip Zdarsky

Of course Pizza Dog is on a T-shirt now

pizza is my business

After Hawkeye #11, I fully expect to see a Pizza Dog miniseries, if not a monthly spinoff … and even a guest spot in an upcoming episode of Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. Heck, maybe Marvel is just waiting until Comic-Con International to tell us one of those 2016 film-release dates already claimed is going to the dogs …

That’s just speculation, of course, but what I do know is that Pizza Dog has made his way to a T-shirt. WeLoveFine.com has a new design featuring David Aja and Matt Hollingworth’s art from that issue, in both men’s and women’s sizes. Pizza is his business, and business is good … check ‘em out below.

Continue Reading »

Re-reading ‘Invincible Iron Man,’ Part 5: ‘Demon’ to ‘The Future’

rings

This is it! The (thrilling?) conclusion of our re-reading The Invincible Iron Man series, which has covered the entire Matt Fraction and Salvador Larroca series over the course of — let’s see … one, two, three, fourfive posts. Today, we look at the last year and a half worth of issues, which are collected in a trio of trades that see our hero facing off against his ultimate villain in an attempt to save the world from destruction. (Spoiler warning: He succeeds.)

Continue Reading »

Re-reading ‘Invincible Iron Man,’ Part 4: ‘Unfixable’ and ‘Fear Itself’

iron man's new costumeReady for the penultimate installment of our re-reading of writer Matt Fraction and artist Salvador Larroca’s impressive five-year, 60-ish issue run on The Invincible Iron Man? Well, if not, you can always come back later when you are; it will be right here waiting.

Today we look at one official part of the run, and two more collections worth of Fraction-written Iron Man comics, which aren’t necessarily labeled as part of The Invincible Iron Man, because Marvel moves in mysterious ways.

Vol. 8 Unfixable (#501-503, Free Comic Book Day 2010 Iron Man/Thor, Rescue #1): With this volume, the drifting of the narrative glimpsed in the previous volume becomes more pronounced, with the bulk of the collection devoted to the next chapter of the Invincible Iron Man storyline and ending, mid-book, with a “Continued In FEAR ITSELF!” tag, and a pair of one-shots that sorta distract from the ongoing story (but certainly needed to be collected somewhere, if only for us wait-for-the-trade types) filling up the rest of the book.

In the title story, Stark is busily pitching his repulsor technology’s consumer applications, when he’s interrupted by “the post-life crisis ” of Spider-Man’s villain Otto “Doctor Octopus” Octavius, who, in the Spider-Man books of the time, had developed a terminal, degenerative disease and turned himself into a barely recognizable cyborg of sorts, his arms folded and legs tugged up like some sort of mummy awaiting burial, while a mass of mechanical arms did all his moving for him.

Continue Reading »

Re-reading ‘Invincible Iron Man,’ Part 3: ‘Stark Reslient’ and ‘My Monsters’

ironman

Today we continue our look at Matt Fraction and Salvador Larroca’s The Invincible Iron Man run with the next three volumes, which contain another new direction for the series, and the several instances of people other than Larroca drawing the series for the first time.

Vols. 4 and 5: Stark Resilient Books 1 and 2 (#25-33 ): Like the 12-issue story arc “World’s Most Wanted,” “Stark Resilient” is such a long story arc that it takes up two trade collections.

When we last left Stark, his friends and allies had just reinstalled a back-up of his brain into his body after he was left in a vegetative state by his heroic efforts to deny Norman Osborn access to his most dangerous secrets. While the first two years of the book were devoted to following the Iron Man through-line of the publisher’s massive Civil War-to-Siege storyline, with the 25th issue Matt Fraction and Salvador Larroca essentially get to start over.

Continue Reading »

Re-reading ‘Invincible Iron Man,’ Part 2: ‘Five Nightmares’ to ‘Stark: Disassembled’

inv iron man

Oh, good, you came back. Today we’re going to take a look at the first four collections worth of Matt Fraction, Salvador Larroca and company’s The Invincible Iron Man, which accounts for the first 24 issues of the series and two of the several completely different (but narratively and thematically connected) directions the series took.

The Invincible Iron Man, Vol. 1: The Five Nightmares (#1-7): As I mentioned Tuesday, this title launched the same summer that director Jon Favreau’s Iron Man, starring Robert Downey Jr. as Tony Stark, opened, and writing a new, second title with Iron Man as the hero must have seemed a rather daunting task, given that Downey and Favreau’s cool, charming war profiteer turned warrior for peace bore little resemblance to the Marvel Universe version of the character of the time, whom writer Mark Millar had turned into the publisher’s greatest villain during Civil War and its aftermath.

Continue Reading »

Re-reading ‘Invincible Iron Man,’ Part 1: What’s so great about ‘Invincible Iron Man’?

inv iron man

With regular old prose books, it’s easy: If you want to read the books that inspired big-budget summer movies like The Great Gatsby or World War Z, you need only pick up the novels with the same name.

Comic-book superhero movies, on the other hand, are a bit more tricky, as they rarely adapt a single, standalone story, but rather cherry-pick characters, plotlines, designs and images from several different comic books by various creators and published in various decades, all blended together in a rebooted, remixed mélange of an adaptation.

So if you walked out of a theater in the early ’00s wanting to read the comics that Blade or X-Men or Spider-Man or Daredevil were based on, well, you’d have to do some research first, and you’d end up with a whole stack of comics for each, none of which really replicated the same tone, world or experience of watching the films starring those heroes.

Cognizant of that, Marvel gradually got better at producing new comics to sell to fans of its movies. Some of these attempts to align comic books more closely with their cinematic versions have been better than others, of course.

The best of these was probably The Invincible Iron Man by writer Matt Fraction and artist Salvador Larroca, the 60-issue series that debuted in summer 2008, around the time the original Iron Man movie  was in theaters, and concluded in fall 2012, just six months ahead of Iron Man 3, which, depending on contract negotiations, could end up being the final Iron Man film (it was certainly constructed as the end of a trilogy of films).

Continue Reading »

What Are You Reading? with Allison Baker

nursenursecover-tease

Happy Mother’s Day and welcome to What Are You Reading?, our weekly look at the comics, books and what have you we’ve been checking out lately. Joining us today is Allison Baker, co-publisher of Bandette, Edison Rex and all the other Monkeybrain Comics you can find on comiXology.

To see what Allison and the Robot 6 crew have been reading, click below.

Continue Reading »

What Are You Reading? with Chris Sims

Wolverine_and_the_X-Men_tease

Hello and welcome to What Are You Reading?, our weekly look at all the comics and other stuff we’ve been checking out lately. Today our special guest is Chris Sims, senior writer for ComicsAlliance, blogger at Chris’s Invincible Super Blog and writer of comics like Dracula the Unconquered and Awesome Hospital.

To see what Chris and the Robot 6 crew have been reading, click below.

Continue Reading »


Browse the Robot 6 Archives