Matthew Dow Smith Archives - Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

Ordway and Rude team for ‘Adventures of Superman’ story

Art by Jon Bogdanove

Art by Jon Bogdanove

DC Comics has announced a new lineup for its digital-first series Adventures of Superman that includes a collaboration between veterans Jerry Ordway and Steve Rude.

No stranger to the Man of Steel, Ordway was a staple of DC in the 1980s and ’90s known for his runs as artist, writer-artist and then writer of The Adventures of Superman and writer-artist of Superman. And while mostly closely associated with his own Nexus, Rude also has a past with the Last Son of Krypton: He illustrated the 1990 miniseries World’s Finest and the 1999 crossover The Incredible Hulk vs. Superman.

Ordway and Rude’s story, “Seed of Destruction,” appears April 14.

The other creators in the March and April lineup are: Joe Keatinge, Ming Doyle and Brent Schoonover with “Strange Visitor,” Part 1; Keatinge, Doyle, David Williams and Al Gordon with “Strange Visitor,” Part 2; Keatinge, Tula Lotay and Jason Shawn Alexander with “Strange Visitor,” Part 3; Kelly Sue DeConnick and Valentine De Landro with the one-part “Mystery Box”; and Steve Niles and Matthew Dow Smith with the one-part “Ghosts of Krypton.”

New chapters of Adventures of Superman are available each Monday at DC Digital First.

Kickstart My Art | Bad Karma

Creators Alex Grecian, Jeremy Haun, B. Clay Moore and Seth Peck have launched a Kickstarter campaign forBad Karma, a 200-page anthology featuring comic-book stories, prose and illustrations by those four and their collaborators.

The assembled talent is impressive indeed, working on five main stories: “Middleton” by Grecian and Phil Hester; “Chaos Agent” by Haun and Mike Tisserand; “Old Dog” by Moore and Christopher Mitten; “Hellbent” by Peck and Tigh Walker; and “The Ninth Life of Solomon Gunn” written by Grecian, Haun, Moore and Peck, and illustrated by Haun. These strips, all stylistically different and set in various time periods, all threaten to coalesce into a larger narrative: “Each of these concepts is separate from one another, designed to stand on their own, but there are subtle threads that run through each. One of these threads is the presence of the Kraken Corporation, a mysterious organization whose activities play a part (whether large or small) in each story.”

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Amazon Studios debuts second issue of free comic

 

Amazon made a splash last month with the publication of Blackburn Burrow, a digital comic that it’s distributing for free via its Amazon Studios, a crowdsourcing project for movie scripts. Written by Ron Marz and illustrated by Matthew Dow Smith, the comic originated as an Amazon Studios screenplay and was produced by 12 Gauge Comics. Not only was the first issue free, but Amazon actually paid people to read it: Anyone who read the first issue and filled out a short survey got a $5 Amazon gift card.

Well, Issue 2 is now out, and while Amazon may not pay you to read it, it’s still free on Graphicly or via the Kindle store, and you’re still welcome to share your thoughts via a survey. You may not get five bucks, but you will have the satisfaction of knowing you have made the eventual movie that will be produced from this marginally better.

Issue 3 will be out in November.

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What Are You Reading? with Alex de Campi

Megillat Esther

Hello and welcome to What Are You Reading? This week we’re joined by music video director and comic book writer Alex de Campi, whose works include Smoke, Kat & Mouse, Valentine and the in-production Ashes.

To see at Alex and the Robot 6 crew have been reading, click below.

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Amazon enters the digital comics world with Blackburn Burrow

The online retail giant Amazon, which already has a publishing arm of its own, has added digital comics to its portfolio with the release of Blackburn Burrow, a comic that is — they make no bones about it — a movie pitch. In fact, the comic originated as a screenplay in Amazon Studios, which is a sort of crowdsourcing commons where people can upload scripts, videos and other projects, and those with the best feedback rise to the top of the heap, apparently. Amazon has a number of projects from Amazon Studios in development, although none are in actual production yet, but it’s early days for them.

Blackburn Burrow was produced by 12 Gauge Comics, an actual comics publisher, and the creative team of writer Ron Marz and artist Matthew Dow Smith has some serious comics cred. I actually read the comic: It’s not bad, but it doesn’t really rise above its genre. It’s a horror comic set during the Civil War, featuring a blind ex-soldier who starts off killing some kind of a witch and then gets sent by the War Department to investigate mysterious doings in a small Georgia town. The art is serviceable — honestly, it looks like it was done in a hurry, but Smith has a deft style and it’s very readable. A lot of horror comics load up the panels with details and gore, but his restrained hand suggests he is going for story over effects. So far, the comic hasn’t broken any new ground, but it’s entertaining enough.

At the end of the comic (which is hosted on Graphicly and can also be read on the Kindle) there’s a link to an online survey, and if you complete the survey, Amazon will send you a $5 gift card. The survey is pretty painless, but there are a lot of questions about the comic so don’t try to cheat and skip the required reading.

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Monkeybrain Comics explodes on Twitter, launches early

Bandette #1

If you only checked Twitter today for your news, you know that, among other fun facts, Anderson Cooper is gay, Big Sean gave Justin Bieber a pinkie ring and Chris Roberson announced the new digital comics initiative Monkeybrain Comics is coming July 4.

Make that was coming, actually–due to the attention they received today, Monkeybrain and comiXology decided to launch the line early.

“With “#Monkeybrain” trending worldwide on Twitter most of the day, Monkeybrain Comics and comiXology have taken the unprecedented step of releasing the entire launch line of Monkeybrain Comics two days early. Available now at this link, fans worldwide can stop tweeting about “#Monkeybrain” and start experiencing this great new line of comics. (But seriously, don’t stop tweeting about it either! – Chris and Allison.),” read the press release from comiXology.

Available now from comiXology are:

  • Aesop’s Ark by J. Torres and Jennifer L. Meyer
  • Amelia Cole and the Unknown World by Adam P. Knave, DJ Kirkbride and Nick Brokenshire
  • Bandette by Paul Tobin and Colleen Coover
  • Edison Rex by Chris Roberson and Dennis Culver
  • October Girl by Matthew Dow Smith

I’m downloading Bandette as I type this, soon to be followed by the rest. The comics are 13-16 pages each for 99 cents except for Amelia Cole and the Unknown World, which is $1.99 for 31 pages. I mean, seriously; 99 cents for a Paul Tobin and Colleen Coover comic? I’m all over that. You can check out artwork from each of them over on CBR.

What might have been: Captain Britain by Matthew Dow Smith & Guy Davis

Captain Britain by Matthew Dow Smith

Last month the artist blog Comic Twart did themed drawings around the idea “What if Comic Twart ran Marvel?” In that spirit, writer/artist Matthew Dow Smith (Dr. Who) shares his rendition of a Captain Britain that was originally redesigned by Guy Davis (B.P.R.D.). It was part of a pitch they made to Marvel.

“… I spent a lot of time early in my career pitching projects that I could write to anyone who would listen, and the closest I ever came to getting one off the ground was a Captain Britain mini-series at Marvel, with Guy Davis on board as the artist,” he said on his blog. “This was right as Marvel had put Grant Morrison on the X-Men, and they were open to a lot of new directions for their stable of characters. And Guy and I had planned out a pretty radical new direction for Brian Braddock. Unfortunately, our editor was suddenly let go before we started work on the first issue and the project got dropped, but Guy had already turned in a radical redesign of CB’s costume that would have played in perfectly with our plans for the character, which included him finding Excalibur and becoming tied directly to the Arthur legend.”

Via Mark Kardwell


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