Panel Syndicate Archives - Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

You can now buy prints of Vaughan & Martin’s ‘The Private Eye’

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If, like me, you’re a big fan of The Private Eye, the digital comic by Brian K. Vaughan and Marcos Martin, you may be pleased to learn Panel Syndicate has opened a store where you can buy prints from the acclaimed sci-fi mystery set in a world where privacy is at a premium.

So now you can get 17.7-inch by 12.6-inch prints of Martin and colorist Muntsa Vicente’s covers for issues 1 and 4, or pages from Issue 1; there’s also a limited-edition black-and-white print. They’re $20 each, plus $10 shipping (except for that last one, which will set you back $50).

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The wait is over: Vaughan & Martin’s ‘The Private Eye’ #4 arrives

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It’s been more than three months since we last saw a new installment of The Private Eye, the name-your-own-price digital comic by Brian K. Vaughan, Marcos Martin and Muntsa Vicente, but now the wait is over with the release of the fourth issue on Panel Syndicate.

Planned for “around 10 issues total,” The Private Eye is a sci-fi detective story set in a not-too-distant future where surveillance is so prevalent, and privacy so sacred, that everyone possesses a secret identity. Against that backdrop, the protagonist — an unlicensed journalist, akin to a private investigator — is drawn into a mysterious plot.

You can check out a preview of the 30-page fourth issue below.

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Peer behind the curtain of Vaughan & Martin’s ‘The Private Eye’

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Although it appears we’ll have to wait a while longer for the fourth issue of The Private Eye, the acclaimed digital comic by Brian K. Vaughan, Marcos Martin and Muntsa Vincente, Panel Syndicate is making the interim a little easier to endure with the release of The Making of The Private Eye, an 85-page “inside look at the creation of the digital comic.”

As with The Private Eye, readers are asked to name their own price for this special issue, which includes such behind-the-scenes content as Vaughan’s original pitch, Martin’s character designs and email exchanges between the creators. You can get a sneak peek below.

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‘Maybe the best thing that’s ever happened to mainstream comics’

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“I think the digital distribution revolution is maybe the best thing that’s ever happened to mainstream comics. I really miss the days when you could find a comics spinner rack in every drug store, but now anyone who owns a mobile device can have their own personal spinner rack, and it’s always stocked with every issue imaginable. I don’t know if creators at other companies are privy to exactly how many digital copies their books are selling these days, but the statements Fiona and I get from Image are pretty staggering. I realize that’s not true for every book, but the day when many titles start selling more digital copies than print copies is not years away, it’s months away.”

Brian K. Vaughan, discussing digital comics in a new interview with Comic Book Resources about Saga and The Private Eye


Vaughan and Martin’s ‘The Private Eye’ #3 is now available

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More than seven weeks after the second issue debuted, Brian K. Vaughan and Marcos Martin continue their name-your-own-price digital comic with the release of The Private Eye #3.

A detective story that centers on timely issues of privacy and surveillance, The Private Eye is set in a not-too-distant future, where everybody in the United States has a secret identity: “Our protagonist is a member of the paparazzi, outlaw private investigators who dig up the kind of personal dirt no longer readily available through search engines. It’s a mystery with lots of masks, but no superpowers.”

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Vaughan and Martin’s ‘The Private Eye’ #2 now on sale

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About a month and a half after the debut of The Private Eye, the name-your-own-price digital comic from Brian K. Vaughan and Marcos Martin, the duo is back with the second issue of the futuristic detective story.

In case you’re a little late to the game, The Private Eye is set in 2076, “when everyone in the United States has a secret identity. Our protagonist is a member of the paparazzi, outlaw private investigators who dig up the kind of personal dirt no longer readily available through search engines. It’s a mystery with lots of masks, but no superpowers.”

The 32-page second issue is now available on the Panel Syndicate website. As “name-your-own-price” suggests, you can pay whatever you choose, although the Vaughan and Marcos think 99 cents is fair (the writer says $3 seemed to be the most common payment for the first issue).

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Quote of the Day | The price is right

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“I’m delighted to say that many more people paid us than didn’t. Those who opted to pay something paid at least 99 cents, and I don’t think too many people paid more than $5. Three bucks, the cost of most new paper comics, seemed to be a common payment.”

– writer Brian K. Vaughan, revealing to The New York Times the lowest and highest amounts paid for the first issue of The Private Eye, his digital collaboration with Marcos Martin and Muntsa Vicente. Readers were encouraged to name their own price, with 99 cents as the recommended amount.


Vaughan and Martin launch name-your-price digital comic

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I was excited by the teasers for Brian K. Vaughan and Marcos Martin’s creator-owned projectSaga is one of my favorite current reads, and I love anything the artist draws — and now I’m pleased to see the actual announcement doesn’t disappoint.

Rather publish a traditional miniseries, which is what I was expecting, the Doctor Strange: The Oath collaborators have reteamed for Panel Syndicate, a website where they’ll release digital comics in a variety of formats, all DRM-free, which will undoubtedly please those who have been critical the the industry’s predominant digital-delivery methods. What’s more, the creators are allowing readers to name their price, although “we think 99 cents is a pretty fair asking price for our new issues” (hitting upon another hot-button subject in the digital debate, that $2.99 or $3.99 is too expensive for a standard-length comic).

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