Rob Williams Archives - Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

Comics A.M. | Gallery’s Denver Comic Con proceeds stolen

The Hall of Justice art gallery

The Hall of Justice art gallery

Crime | A successful weekend at Denver Comic Con turned sour for Zac and Mindy Conley, the owners of The Hall of Justice art gallery, after a thief stole a cash box containing their proceeds from the show, about $1,000, and some special orders for Mindy Conley’s artwork, which would have earned the couple another $1,500. The Conleys say they were planning to use the money for rent for their home and studio and the payment for their booth at next year’s Denver Comic Con. “We’ve been fighting to turn this place into some really cool. And every month we’re wondering if we’re going to survive,” Zac said. However, friends are rallying around: Illustrator Drew Litton, who will be showing his work at the gallery next month, will donate a portion of the proceeds to the Conleys, and gifts are also coming in through their Facebook page. [The Denver Post]

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Rob Williams on being ‘Ordinary’ with D’Israeli

Ordinary-header

Next week sees the release of Judge Dredd Megazine #340, featuring the debut of “Ordinary,” a creator-owned strip by writer Rob Williams and artist D’Israeli, the creative team behind the acclaimed 2000AD strip “Low Life,: I’ve been a big fan of both their work for quite a while now — in Williams’ case, since his first published work, the great Cla$$war, in 2002; in the case of D’Israeli, scarily enough, it’s been since his “Timulo'”strip ran in Deadline in the late 1980s. I managed to grab a word with Williams about the new series, and he happily obliged, and sent along a veritable mountain of preview art to boot.

Robot 6: So Rob, the last ordinary man in a world of the super-powered, eh? But what’s Ordinary really about?

Rob Williams: I’m a little wary of frightening people off by talking about themes. “Ordinary” is filled with spectacle, big-Hollywood action set pieces and outlandish characters that are, hopefully, quite memorable, This is a world where everyone gets a different superpower, after all — no two people are the same. But, at its heart, it’s about emotionally allowing yourself to come to terms with fatherhood, really. Out main character, Michael Fisher, is a divorcee who very rarely sees his son when we first meet him. And then the world starts going to hell and it’s up to him to try and find this boy he hardly knows even though there’s a super-powered danger around every turn. And, for Michael, it’s coming to realise the real reason he never sees his son. The book’s called “Ordinary” for reasons that aren’t just about super powers and explosions and giants and talking bears and huge battles. There’s an emotional arc for our lead that is pretty unusual for modern comics, I think.

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Rob Williams’ blog showcases an array of all-star collaborators

Welsh writer Rob Williams must have been hit with the lucky stick as a child. His first published comic (Com.x’s Cla$$war) featured art by the great Trevor Hairsine. When Hairsine was poached by Marvel halfway through the series, his replacement was Travel Foreman. Since then, Williams has been consistently teamed with some of the best stylists around on many of his projects: In the U.K. he’s worked with the likes of D’Israeli, Edmund Bagwell and Brendan McCarthy.

It also seems that whenever 2000AD secures the services of a big U.S. artist to draw a Judge Dredd strip, such as Guy Davis, Williams is always the attached writer. On projects for U.S. publishers, he’s been paired with artists of the caliber of Cary Nord, Cully Hamner, Phil Bond, Greg Tocchini and Simone Bianchi. I’m really just skimming the surface here; there are plenty of other great artists he’s worked with in the last couple of years I’m sure I’m forgetting.

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A brief chat with Edmund Bagwell about ‘The Ten-Seconders’

BAGWELL HEADER

Like many, I first encountered the art of Edmund Bagwell in 2005, in the first issue of Liam Sharp’s extremely short-lived but influential anthology Event Horizon. Sharp introduced lots of new talent in those two issues, but it seemed that Bagwell was to be the book’s breakout star. Here was an artist with many strings to his bow, producing lushly rendered digital paintings and linework to accompany prose short stories in the first volume, and also illustrating Rich Johnson’s role-playing satire “Chase Variant” in the second.

U.K. comics history is full of instances of well-intentioned anthologies eventually failing, leaving that great survivor 2000AD to cherry-pick their best talent. This was again the case, with Bagwell soon working on some memorable short stories with writers Al Ewing and Arthur Wyatt. Short one-offs such as “Future Shocks” and “Terror Tales” are usually seen as dues-paying exercises by the editorial staff at 2000AD, and Bagwell was rewarded by being commissioned to draw the series “Cradlegrave,” written by John Smith.

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Exclusive Preview | ‘The Ten-Seconders: Godsend’

1053262_10151464576576366_1973361711_oIn its 36-year history, the venerable U.K. comics anthology 2000AD has only ever featured a handful of superhero strips. Of those relative few, most commentators would say they’re a pretty strong bunch — one cold classic (“Zenith”), and a couple of neglected psychedelic gems (“Storming Heaven,” “Zaucer of Zilk”).

Darkest of them all is Rob Williams’ post-apocalyptic “The Ten-Seconders,” an ongoing tale that sets humanity against a race of superhuman aliens, the self-styled “gods.” When mankind decides to resist against the rule of their new super-powered overlords, the rag-tag group of surviving guerrillas dub themselves “The Ten-Seconders,” as 10 seconds is the average time a human can expect to last in a confrontation with a god.

During its previous two runs in 2000AD, “The Ten-Seconders” has been drawn by four artists: Mark Harrison, Dom Reardon, Sean Thomas and Ben Oliver. Now, after a five-year absence,  the strip returns, revitalized by Williams’ pairing with Edmund Bagwell, an artist whose work effortlessly traverses from scenes of ordinary human life before the invasion to the graceful arrival of the gods, to their violence and terror, and onto hints of oncoming cosmic threats. Basically, Bagwell was born to work on this scale. In previous arcs, the threats were analogs for the Justice League and then the Vertigo anti-heroes. This time, we have Galactus/Celestial-styled creatures looming over the planet. Bagwell is one of those few artists whose work has a clear Kirby influence without that fully overpowering his entire style. I’ve been championing Bagwell’s work since 2006, and I literally cannot wait to see what he has in store for us this time.

2000AD has provided ROBOT 6 an exclusive first look at the full opening chapter of the return of “The Ten-Seconders.” It works as an introduction, a recap and as a secret origin for the series’ protagonist Malloy, and leaves us on a doozy of a cliffhanger. As such, it packs a hell of a lot into just six pages!

“The Ten-Seconders” returns July 3 in 2000AD Prog 1839.

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What Are You Reading? with Tim Lattie

from Phonogram: The Singles Club

Welcome to What Are You Reading?, where the Robot 6 crew shares their picks for who we think should play a young Han Solo. Of course, we unanimously chose Nathan Fillion, so instead we’ll talk about what comics we’ve been reading. Joining us today is special guest Tim Lattie, the creator of Night Stars. Tim is currently running a Kickstarter to raise funds to publish it, so head over there and check it out.

To see what Tim and the Robot 6 crew have been reading, click below.

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Food or Comics? | Avocados or Avengers

Welcome to Food or Comics?, where every week we talk about what comics we’d buy at our local comic shop based on certain spending limits — $15 and $30 — as well as what we’d get if we had extra money or a gift card to spend on a splurge item.

Check out Diamond’s release list or ComicList, and tell us what you’re getting in our comments field.

Avengers #1

Chris Arrant

If I had $15, I’d start out with Legend of Luther Strode #1 (Image, $3.50). I was behind the times on the first series, but now I will raise my fist to the air and decree “NO MORE!” (to the stunned silence of my local comic shop owner). Justin Jordan really brought a different take on this story, but for me the sizzle on this is Tradd Moore’s art. It reminds me of Sam Keith’s middle-period during his Marvel Comics Presents Wolverine run, and that’s nothing but a good thing. After that I’d get Stumptown #4 (Oni Press, $3.99). Some might compare Dex’s journey to that of Jessica Jones in Marvel’s Alias, but it’s anything but. Greg Rucka really knows how to make a story feel more than just mere fiction. My third pick this week would be Invincible #98 (Image, $2.99), seeing Mark Grayson get his powers back – just in time to be stomped into the ground, from the looks of it. Reading this series since the first issue, I’m noticing the colorist change more and more here; John Rauch definitely is a step removed from FCO Plascencia, and I’m still getting used to it. Kirkman and Ottley are delivering here so well that Domino’s should be jealous. (ba-dum CHING!) Last up in my Wednesday haul would be Avengers #1 (Marvel, $3.99). I’ve noticed in doing Food or Comics for as long as I have how I’ll routinely follow writers but when they manage to get an artist I particularly like I’ll fall over myself trying to get to it. Case in point, this book, with Jonathan Hickman joining forces with Jerome Opeña to kick off a new era for Marvel’s flagship book. I’m all for “Jonathan Hickman’s Avengers,” but I’m even more excited to see Opeña’s take on this.

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What Are You Reading? with Salgood Sam

Tale of Sand

Hello and welcome to What Are You Reading? Today our guest is Salgood Sam, who has just relaunched his independent personal anthology series Revolver. He is also completing the last chapter of a graphic novel called Dream Life after a successful Indiegogo funding drive to finance it. He also publishes the Canadian-centric comics blog Sequential. As he told me, he “usually has too many projects going on and does not get enough sleep.”

To see what Salgood Sam and the Robot 6 crew have been reading, click below …

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Food or Comics? | Multiple Warheads of lettuce

Welcome to Food or Comics?, where every week we talk about what comics we’d buy at our local comic shop based on certain spending limits — $15 and $30 — as well as what we’d get if we had extra money or a gift card to spend on a splurge item.

Check out Diamond’s release list or ComicList, and tell us what you’re getting in our comments field.

Multiple Warheads: Alphabet to Infinity #1

Chris Arrant

If I had $15, I’d dutifully pick up Dark Horse Presents #17 (Dark Horse, $7.99). With all the stories and the variety of genres, this is a comics haul all under one roof. This month’s issue has a great looking Carla Speed McNeil cover, and inside’s star looks to be Richard Corben adapting an Edgar Allan Poe story. Beat that, comics! After that I’d do an Image two-fer with Multiple Warheads: Alphabet to Infinity #1 (Image, $3.99) and Invincible #96 (Image, $2.99). On the Multiple Warheads front, I’ve been salivating over this ever since it was announced – I bought the premature version of this back when it was published by Oni, and it’s built up in my mind as potentially greater than King City … and I loved King City. In terms of Invincible, I feel this book has the best artists working in superhero comics – and the writing’s not to shabby either. They’re doing a lot of world-building here, and having Cory Walker join with Ryan Ottley on this essentially split book makes it the highpoint of the series so far.

If I had $30, I’d double back to Image and get Prophet #30 (Image, $3.99). Of all the prophets, I love Old Man Prophet the best – and this issue looks like a mind-bender. After that I’d get Ghost #1 (Dark Horse, $2.99). Kelly Sue DeConnick and Phil Noto look like a dream team and Dark Horse really scored a coup by getting them together on this book. I was a big fan of the original series (Adam Hughes!) so I’m excited to see if this new duo can make it work in a modern context. Third up would be Secret Avengers #33 (Marvel, $3.99). Make no mistake, I love that Rick Remender is so popular now that he’s graduated to the upper echelon of books, but I’m remorseful he’s having to leave his great runs on this, Uncanny X-Force and Venom. This Descendents arc is really picking up steam. Lastly, I’d get National Comics: Madame X #1 (DC, $3.99). I’m a fair-to-middling fan of Madame Xanadu, but the creators here – Rob Williams and Trevor Hairsine – mean it’s a Cla$$war reunion! Love that book, love these guys, and love my expectations here.

If I could splurge, I’d splurge all over Shaolin Cowboy Adventure Magazine (Dark Horse, $15.99). Can DH do two excellent anthologies? We’ll see… but fortunately they’ve got Geof Darrow’s Shaolin Cowboy to lead the way in this pulpy throwback. Shine on, you crazy super-detailed diamond, shine on.

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DC Comics announces new lineup for Legends of the Dark Knight

From "A Game to Die For," by TJ Fixman and Christopher Mitten

DC Comics has revealed a new creator lineup for its digital-first Legends of the Dark Knight that includes Jeff Parker, Michael Avon Oeming, Phil Hester, Gabriel Hardman and Joshua Hale Fialkov.

Launched in June as part of an expansion of the publisher’s digital-first slate, the out-of-continuity series features standalone stories by different creative teams chronicling some of Batman’s cases. New chapters appear each Thursday.

Here’s the fall schedule:

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C2E2 | A round-up of news and announcements from this weekend

C2E2

The second C2E2 convention, hosted by ReedPOP in Chicago, wrapped up yesterday. Here’s an attempt to round up all the comic-related news that was announced at various panels during the show. I’d be surprised if I didn’t miss something.

While Marvel and DC Comics were both in attendance and held multiple panels, Marvel dominated in terms of the number of announcements, which is no surprise — DC tends to favor announcing new projects and creative teams on their Source blog rather than at conventions these days. I only point this out after seeing the long list of Marvel announcements and the far fewer DC ones in my summary below.

• Marvel confirmed earlier reports by officially announcing the creative teams for the two “Big Shots” titles they’ve been teasing, Daredevil and The Punisher. Irredeemable/Amazing Spider-Man writer Mark Waid will pen Daredevil, with Amazing Spider-Man artists Paolo Rivera and Marcos Martin illustrating.

“Tonally, it’s still very much a crime series, but we’re toning down the noir a bit and playing up the high adventure a bit more,” Waid told Comic Book Resources. “He’s the Man Without Fear. I want to see that constantly. I want to see him diving face-first into perils that would make Green Lantern shriek like a little girl.”

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