Rumiko Takahashi Archives - Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

Viz bringing back Urasawa’s ‘Monster’ with omnibus editions

monster-v1Viz Media announced over the weekend at Otakon in Baltimore that it will bring Naoki Urasawa’s acclaimed psychological thriller Monster back into print next year a two-in-one format. Anime News Network reports the new oversized omnibus series, called Monster: The Perfect Edition, will debut in July, with a new volume released every three months.

Originally released in North America from 2006 to 2008, the 18-volume manga, Monster tells the story of a young brain surgeon who ruins his own reputation by saving the life of a boy, only for the child to grow up to become a sociopath.

The series was adapted in 2004 as an anime; HBO and Guillermo del Toro are collaborating on a live-action version.

The new omnibus treatment will cut the number of volumes in half, which each retailing for $19.99. Viz will take the same approach with Rumiko Takahashi’s martial arts/romantic comedy Ranma ½, which will go back into print beginning in March.

Comics A.M. | Tokyo’s Comiket to lose $117,900 due to threat letter

Kuroko’s Basketball

Conventions | Japan’s Comic Market (aka Comiket), the world’s largest convention dedicated to self-published comics, stands to lose about $117,900 because of a decision to bar artist groups (“circles”) dedicated to the manga Kuroko’s Basketball following a threat letter. Organizers are refunding entrance fees to about 900 Kuroko’s Basketball circles that registered for the Dec. 29-31 event, and must help pay for increased security in cooperation with local police and the Tokyo Big Sight complex. Since October, letters containing powdered and liquid substances have been sent to more than 20 locations linked to Kuroko’s Basketball creator Tadatoshi Fujimaki. At least six Kuroko’s Basketball doujinshi events have been canceled. [Anime News Network]

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Comics A.M. | Manga creators team up to help devastated region

InuYasha

Manga | Eight manga creators, including Rumiko Takahashi (InuYasha, Maison Ikkoku), will create new comics featuring the characters they are known for and donate the royalties to the effort to rebuild the Tohoku region of Japan, which was devastated by the 2011 earthquake and tsunami. The fund-raiser is being spearheaded by Gallery Fake creator Fujihiko Hosono. [The Japan Times]

Awards | While we were all busy at New York Comic Con, the Frankfurt Book Fair was going on in Germany, and Torsten Adair rounds up the comics awards that were given at the fair to German and international creators. [The Beat]

Conventions | Christopher Spata talks to some of the attendees at this past weekend’s Tampa Bay Comic Con, including the parents of a 1-year-old who was in costume—and already has a room full of superhero items. [Tampa Bay Online]

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Akamatsu: Japanese copyright changes threaten fan comics

Doraemon doujinshi

Here’s a quick thought experiment: What would happen to you if you made your own Mickey Mouse comic and sold it online or at conventions? You would expect to feel the wrath of Disney pretty quickly, wouldn’t you?

Yet doujinshi, fan-made comics, are a huge part of Japanese culture, and many of them involve characters from existing manga series. And Ken Akamatsu, creator of Negima and Love Hina—as well as his own doujinshi—wants it to stay that way, which is why he is speaking out against Japan joining the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement, a trade agreement would make copyright laws uniform among the nine signatories, including the U.S. If Japan signs on, Akamatsu says, the new regulations would have a chilling effect on the doujinshi market.

Japan’s current copyright laws allow publishers to tolerate a certain amount of remixing of copyrighted characters, although there are limits: In 2007, for instance, the publisher Shogakukan took legal action against the creator of a Doraemon doujinshi that not only perfectly mimicked the look of the original manga (one of the most popular in all of Asia) but also sold over 13,000 copies.

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