spider-man Archives - Page 2 of 27 - Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

Heroes keep an eye on Toronto from neighborhood watch signs

lamb4Toronto residents may have noticed a host of classic heroes, from Wonder Woman to Astro Boy to the Fantastic Four, are now protecting the city’s streets. At least that’s what many of the neighborhood watch signs insist.

According to CBC News, an artist calling himself Andrew Lamb has “hacked” as many as 70 of the signs, pasting over the familiar houses-with-eyeballs icons with the even more familiar figures from comic books, television and movies (Mr. Rogers, Cliff Huxtable and Dale Cooper, among them).

“I walked by and thought those signs would be much better with a superhero up there,” he told CBC News. “The first one was a splash page — a common thing in comic books, a bunch of superheros popping out at you. Then came Batman and Robin, RoboCop, Beverly Hills Cop, and then it snowballed.”

Lamb acknowledges his project is “technically illegal” — he’s received just two vandalism complaints — but he doesn’t believe it’s “ethically or morally wrong.”

You can see more photos of his handiwork below, and on Lamb’s Instagram account.

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Grumpy Old Fan | Structure, tradition, and Luthor’s League

"Why is the most brilliantly diabolical leader of our time surrounding himself with total nincompoops?"

Why is the most brilliantly diabolical leader of our time surrounding himself with total nincompoops?

As discussed here last week, the final page of Forever Evil promised a particular kind of big event as its follow-up. However, the just-concluded miniseries also inflicted more immediate consequences on the Justice League; it’s those I’ll be talking about today.

* * *

I previously mentioned that the New-52 relaunch/reboot didn’t really add a new “structural” feature to the superhero line, in the way that “Flash of Two Worlds” established the Multiverse or Crisis on Infinite Earths facilitated all those legacy heroes. At the time I didn’t really mention the addition (or re-integration) of the WildStorm and Vertigo characters, but I still don’t think that’s as big a deal as the Multiverse or the generational timeline. The difference is that Flashpoint brought in characters mostly to the present-day DC Universe, whereas COIE and (to a lesser extent) the original Multiverse both dealt regularly with larger spans of time. In the latter cases, the superheroes first emerged in the runup to World War II, and those adventures ended up informing their modern-day counterparts. While the New 52 had books like Demon Knights and All Star Western that were set even further in the past, they could only influence the main superhero line obliquely.

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Hero worship takes on new meaning with stained-glass prints

stained-glass-batman-croppe

If you’re a comics fan with a near-religious devotion to your favorite superheroes, do we have a window treatment for you: Marissa Garner has created a stunning series of prints that imitate the look of stained glass and features everyone from Batman and his allies to Spider-Man and his rogues to Sailor Moon.

What’s more, they’re printed on transparency paper, and can be attached to a window, creating that instant cathedral effect.

Check out some of Garner’s print below, and even more on her Etsy page, where they can be purchased.

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Envious Spider-Man mulls a move to suburbs in animated short

spider-man-suburbs

There’s probably no other superhero more closely associated with New York City than Spider-Man, who was born and raised in Forest Hills, attended college in Greenwich Village, and swings from skyscraper to skyscraper across Midtown.

But in the latest installment of Podtoons, from Left Handed Radio and Above Average, a distracted wall-crawler gets a taste of suburban life when he rescues a woman from Green Goblin and returns her to her New Jersey home. Her spacious three-bedroom New Jersey home … with an office … and in-ground pool.

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Heroes get back to nature in digitally manipulated photos

lapray-superman

It’s not often that we see superheroes enjoying some quiet time and communing with nature, most likely because that would make for some incredibly boring comic books. However, the concept leads to some lovely images, as photographer and digital artist Benoit Lapray demonstrates in his series “The Quest for the Absolute.”

Dropping costumed characters into (mostly) serene settings, Lapray creating scenes of Thor strolling in a lush forest, Spider-Man resting at the side of a winding mountain road, the Silver Surfer pondering a deep valley, Wonder Woman perching in the spray of a waterfall, and more.

Check out some of the images below, and more on Lapray’s website.

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Spider-Woman strikes store, makes off with cash and cigarettes

spider-crime

From store surveillance video

Proving J. Jonah Jameson right time and again, Spider-Man in the past year alone has stolen $6,000 in cash, fought two Captain Americas, been arrested following a robbery and held up a convenience store. Now it appears the wall-crawler has found an ally: Spider-Woman.

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Comics A.M. | TOON Books launches imprint for older readers

Hansel and Gretel

Hansel and Gretel

Publishing | I talked with TOON Books founder Francoise Mouly about her new imprint, TOON Graphics, which will feature “visual books” (picture books and comics) for readers ages 8 and up. The line launches with three titles: Theseus and the Minotaur, by Yves Pommaux, Cast Away on the Letter A, by Fred, and Hansel and Gretel, retold by Neil Gaiman and illustrated by Lorenzo Mattotti. [Publishers Weekly]

Commentary | Former DC Comics senior editor Joan Hilty tackles the issue of sexism in comics and calls for publishers to include more women in their senior editorial rank:. “Women are getting the bestselling books into stores and greenlighting the million-dollar movie franchises, but they’re barely represented among the creative executives who map out the universes and storytelling strategies. That’s where you cement broad-based, long-term loyalty to authors and characters, tap new audiences and trends, and grow readership, without which none of those books or movies would exist.” [The Guardian]

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Watch Andrew Garfield belt out the Spider-Man cartoon theme

garfield-tonight-show

The Amazing Spider-Man star Andrew Garfield has managed to surprise time and again, whether by melting hearts at Comic-Con International 2011 with a heartfelt speech about what the wall-crawler meant to him as a child, shooting hoops with kids while wearing his movie costume, or making waves by asking why the superhero couldn’t be gay.

And Thursday on The Tonight Show he surprised again with an earnest rendition of the theme song from the 1960s Spider-Man animated series, with a little help from host Jimmy Fallon and the Roots.

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Conversing on Comics with Marcos Martin

MarcosMartin

Marcos Martin grew up reading American superhero comics imported to his native Spain, and for the first 13 years of his career, he lived, breathed and drew those heroes in titles like Batgirl: Year One, Doctor Strange: The Oath, The Amazing Spider-Man and Daredevil. But now he’s moved on, devoting himself primarily to creator-owned comics with a reach beyond the direct market. The first sign of that is The Private Eye, the digital comic he created with celebrated writer Brian K. Vaughan about the price of privacy in a futuristic world.

Both Martin and Vaughan have talked with CBR about their project, so for this installment of “Conversing on Comics” I reached deeper into the artist’s work, looking for his influences and his choices. The interview, conducted in late April via Skype, pulls back the curtain on Martin, an ambitious but private professional who’s looking to entertain not just the ardent comic book fan but also more mainstream readers interested in fiction and fables.

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Quote of the Day | Brian Michael Bendis on diversity in comics

Miles Morales“Sure, there are people who look like Captain America who read comics, but there are very few people in the world who look like Captain America. I go to conventions, and you meet hundreds of people over the course of the day, and no two of them look alike. You see women and people of color who love comics, and there’s nothing representing them in a way that isn’t sexualized or something.

“Now, you can’t make these decisions [to be more inclusive] consciously, because then you’re just writing in reaction to things, and that doesn’t work out, dramatically. But subconsciously, if you look at the world around you and see your readers, you go, I wanna write something that I know is true. So you start writing women better and you write people outside of your experience better, because you look at pages of other people’s comics and you don’t recognize it as the world around you.”

— writer Brian Michael Bendis, in an interview with Vulture in which he also discusses why Spider-Man was a multicultural hero even when he was Peter Parker

Comics A.M. | Golden Age artist Barbara Hall passes away

Harvey's Black Cat, by then Barbara Hall (from "Pretty in Ink")

Harvey’s Black Cat, by then Barbara Hall (from “Pretty in Ink”)

Passings | Isabelle “Barbara” Fiske Calhoun, who as Barbara Hall was an artist for Harvey Comics during World War II, died Monday at age 94. Calhoun and her first husband, Irving Fiske, left New York in 1946 and founded a commune in Vermont on land they bought with their wedding money. The commune became the Quarry Hill Creative Center and is “Vermont’s oldest alternative and artist’s retreat.” While the obituary mentions Calhoun’s comics career only in passing, Trina Robbins has more detail in Pretty in Ink: She says Calhoun drew the Black Cat, one of the first comic-book superheroines, and then was the artist for the Speed Comics feature, Girl Commandos, an all-woman team of Nazi fighters led by Pat Parker, War Nurse. “She left comics when her husband-to-be persuaded her to give up cartooning and become an oil painter, a gain for the world of fine art but a loss for comics,” Robbins writes. [Burlington Free Press]

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Peter parkour: This freerunning Spider-Man video is spectacular

spider-parkour

Inspired by The Amazing Spider-Man 2, professional stunt man Ronnie Shalvis dons the familiar red-and-blue costume for an incredible short film in which the wall-crawler runs out of web fluid and turns to — what else? — parkour make his way across the city.

Directed by Cameron Manwaring and Chris Jordan, it’s a beautiful video that follows Shalvis as he leaps across rooftops, scales walls and flips down alleyways.

If you’re curious how they got some of those shots, the answer is drones, courtesy of Sky Candy Aerial Cinema. You can watch the video, along with a look behind the scenes, below.

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Todd McFarlane offers a glimpse of his 350 rejection letters

mcfarlane-rejection letters

Over the course of his 30-year career, Todd McFarlane has spoken frequently about his lone road into the comics industry, one dotted with more than 700 submissions and 350 rejection letters. If you thought that was an apocryphal story akin to tales of having to walk five miles to school … uphill … both ways, think again.

On his Facebook page, the creator of Spawn shares a few photos from his submission days, featuring a sampling of his rejection letters, including one from former Marvel Editor-in-Chief Jim Shooter, as well as a chart he created to track where he sent the packages, and whether he received responses.

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‘Indian Spider-Man’ runs (and climbs and swings) for parliament

Gaurav Sharma wants the votes of residents of South Mumbai, India, and he’ll  go to almost any lengths — or heights — to get them.

An Independent candidate for the lower house of the Parliament of India, Sharma is a martial-arts instructor better known as the Indian Spider-Man. Earlier this year he donned the familiar red-and-blue costume of the Marvel superhero to climb one of Mumbai’s tallest buildings in record time, but now he’s scaling apartment complexes and jumping from window to window and balcony to balcony to drum up support.

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Your move, Peter Parker: Man creates working web-shooter

web-shooter

Countless children, and more than a few adults, have played with toy versions of Spider-Man’s web-shooters, the kind that shoot water or Silly String or short strips of nylon rope. However, it’s never quite like the “actual” thing, or so I’m guessing (come on, in some cases you’re essentially strapping a squirt gun to your wrist).

Enter Patrick Priebe, described by Gizmag as a “German laser weapons hobbyist” — everybody needs a hobby, right? — who has crafted his own real-life web-shooter. Only instead of web fluid, it shoots a brass-tipped mini-harpoon at the end of a length of fishing line. As you can see, it’s pretty impressive, with a triggering mechanism beneath the glove and even an aiming laser. But Priebe doesn’t stop there: He’s also created a wrist-mounted burning laser and a Cyclops-inspired visor … with burning lasers, naturally. Check and mate, Peter Parker!

Check them out in action in the videos below.

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