spider-man Archives - Page 4 of 29 - Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

Comics A.M. | Bill Watterson’s ‘Pearls’ art to be sold for charity

"Pearls Before Swine" art by Watterson

“Pearls Before Swine” art by Watterson

Comic strips | The art from cartoonist Bill Watterson’s surprise return to the comics page earlier this month for a three-day stint on Pearls Before Swine will be auctioned Aug. 8 on behalf of Team Cul de Sac, the charity founded by Chris Sparks to honor Cul de Sac creator Richard Thompson, who has Parkinson’s disease. The proceeds benefiting The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research. A painting by Watterson of one of Thompson’s characters sold in 2012 for $13,000 as part of a benefit auction for Team Cul de Sac. [Team Cul de Sac]

Creators | The tech news site Pando has fired cartoonist Ted Rall, just a month after hiring him, along with journalist David Sirota. While Rall wouldn’t comment on the reason for his dismissal, he did say the news came “really truly out of a clear blue sky. I literally never got anything but A++ reviews,” and he added that editor Paul Carr gave him complete editorial freedom. While Valleywag writer Nitasha Tiku speculates that the two had rubbed investors the wrong way, Carr disputes that, as well as other assertions in the article. Nonetheless, both Rall and Sirota confirmed they were let go. [Valleywag]

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In wake of crimes, a call for crackdown on NYC’s costumed characters

times-square

No sooner had one Times Square Spider-Man been acquitted of attempted assault (but convicted of harassment) than another was accused of groping a woman, leading to calls for regulation of the area’s costumed characters.

“In the last 10 days alone, we’ve seen two Statues of Liberty arrested, a Spider-Man convicted of harassing a tourist, and now a third character arrested for groping a woman in Times Square,” Tim Tompkins, president of the Times Square Alliance, said in a statement obtained by CBS New York. “The situation is out of control and a licensing and regulatory scheme must be put in place.”

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Will Supreme Court weigh in on Kirby heirs’ fight with Marvel?

kirby marvel charactersIn an interesting analysis, Eriq Gardner of The Hollywood Reporter sees signs the U.S. Supreme Court might consider the five-year dispute between Jack Kirby’s heirs and Marvel over the copyrights to many of the company’s most popular characters.

The Second Circuit Court of Appeals in August upheld a 2011 ruling that Kirby’s Marvel creation in the 1960s were work for hire, and therefore not subject to copyright reclamation by his children. (They had filed 45 copyright-termination notices in September 2009, seeking to reclaim what they saw as their father’s stake in such characters as the Avengers, the X-Men, the Fantastic Four and the Incredible Hulk; Marvel fired back with a lawsuit.) In their March petition to the Supreme Court, the Kirby heirs took aim at the Second Circuit’s “instance and expense” test, arguing that it “invariably finds that the pre-1978 work of an independent contractor is ‘work for hire’ under the 1909 Act.”

Gardner points out the the justices discussed the petition at a May conference, and then requested that Marvel respond (the company initially didn’t file a response). Those p0tential portents were followed by a pair of friend-of-the-court briefs: one filed by Bruce Lehman, former director of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, on behalf of himself, former U.S. Register of Copyrights Ralph Oman, the Artists Rights Society and others, and the other by attorney Steven Smyrski on behalf of longtime Kirby friend Mark Evanier, Kirby historian John Morrow and the PEN Center USA.

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Spider-Man acquitted of Times Square assault

spiderman-threat or menaceSpider-Man was acquitted Wednesday on charges of attempted assault in a February 2013 scuffle with a mother who refused to pay him for posing with her children in New York City’s Times Square. Instead, the New York Post reports the judge found the wall-crawler guilty of the lesser charge of harassment.

Echoing J. Jonah Jameson, Assistant District Attorney Andrew Stengel argued that Spider-Man (aka Philip Williams) is a menace to tourists. “Spider ​-Man’s motto is​,​ ​’W​ith great power​,​ comes great responsibility,’​” he said. “The defendant is more supervillain than superhero, spinning a web.”

Although Stengel lobbied for Williams to be sentenced to 15 days in jail, Manhattan Criminal Court Judge Anthony Ferrara opted for time served, but advised the defendant to watch himself.

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NSFW Spider-Man statue removed after arousing complaints

spider-sculpt1-cropped

Sometimes your friendly neighborhood Spider-Man can get a bit too friendly. Case in point: the sculpture of the wall-crawler by Eunsuk Yoo that was (ahem) erected last year at the Lotte Shopping Center in Busan, South Korea.

As you can see from the decidedly not-safe-for-work photos below, courtesy of Kotaku, Peter Parker’s spider-sense isn’t the only thing tingling. However, despite the seemingly unmissable presence of Spider-Man’s amazing friend, the sculpture apparently dangled above the mall’s playground and rest area for about a year before it drew negative attention.

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Heroes keep an eye on Toronto from neighborhood watch signs

lamb4Toronto residents may have noticed a host of classic heroes, from Wonder Woman to Astro Boy to the Fantastic Four, are now protecting the city’s streets. At least that’s what many of the neighborhood watch signs insist.

According to CBC News, an artist calling himself Andrew Lamb has “hacked” as many as 70 of the signs, pasting over the familiar houses-with-eyeballs icons with the even more familiar figures from comic books, television and movies (Mr. Rogers, Cliff Huxtable and Dale Cooper, among them).

“I walked by and thought those signs would be much better with a superhero up there,” he told CBC News. “The first one was a splash page — a common thing in comic books, a bunch of superheros popping out at you. Then came Batman and Robin, RoboCop, Beverly Hills Cop, and then it snowballed.”

Lamb acknowledges his project is “technically illegal” — he’s received just two vandalism complaints — but he doesn’t believe it’s “ethically or morally wrong.”

You can see more photos of his handiwork below, and on Lamb’s Instagram account.

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Grumpy Old Fan | Structure, tradition, and Luthor’s League

"Why is the most brilliantly diabolical leader of our time surrounding himself with total nincompoops?"

Why is the most brilliantly diabolical leader of our time surrounding himself with total nincompoops?

As discussed here last week, the final page of Forever Evil promised a particular kind of big event as its follow-up. However, the just-concluded miniseries also inflicted more immediate consequences on the Justice League; it’s those I’ll be talking about today.

* * *

I previously mentioned that the New-52 relaunch/reboot didn’t really add a new “structural” feature to the superhero line, in the way that “Flash of Two Worlds” established the Multiverse or Crisis on Infinite Earths facilitated all those legacy heroes. At the time I didn’t really mention the addition (or re-integration) of the WildStorm and Vertigo characters, but I still don’t think that’s as big a deal as the Multiverse or the generational timeline. The difference is that Flashpoint brought in characters mostly to the present-day DC Universe, whereas COIE and (to a lesser extent) the original Multiverse both dealt regularly with larger spans of time. In the latter cases, the superheroes first emerged in the runup to World War II, and those adventures ended up informing their modern-day counterparts. While the New 52 had books like Demon Knights and All Star Western that were set even further in the past, they could only influence the main superhero line obliquely.

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Hero worship takes on new meaning with stained-glass prints

stained-glass-batman-croppe

If you’re a comics fan with a near-religious devotion to your favorite superheroes, do we have a window treatment for you: Marissa Garner has created a stunning series of prints that imitate the look of stained glass and features everyone from Batman and his allies to Spider-Man and his rogues to Sailor Moon.

What’s more, they’re printed on transparency paper, and can be attached to a window, creating that instant cathedral effect.

Check out some of Garner’s print below, and even more on her Etsy page, where they can be purchased.

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Envious Spider-Man mulls a move to suburbs in animated short

spider-man-suburbs

There’s probably no other superhero more closely associated with New York City than Spider-Man, who was born and raised in Forest Hills, attended college in Greenwich Village, and swings from skyscraper to skyscraper across Midtown.

But in the latest installment of Podtoons, from Left Handed Radio and Above Average, a distracted wall-crawler gets a taste of suburban life when he rescues a woman from Green Goblin and returns her to her New Jersey home. Her spacious three-bedroom New Jersey home … with an office … and in-ground pool.

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Heroes get back to nature in digitally manipulated photos

lapray-superman

It’s not often that we see superheroes enjoying some quiet time and communing with nature, most likely because that would make for some incredibly boring comic books. However, the concept leads to some lovely images, as photographer and digital artist Benoit Lapray demonstrates in his series “The Quest for the Absolute.”

Dropping costumed characters into (mostly) serene settings, Lapray creating scenes of Thor strolling in a lush forest, Spider-Man resting at the side of a winding mountain road, the Silver Surfer pondering a deep valley, Wonder Woman perching in the spray of a waterfall, and more.

Check out some of the images below, and more on Lapray’s website.

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Spider-Woman strikes store, makes off with cash and cigarettes

spider-crime

From store surveillance video

Proving J. Jonah Jameson right time and again, Spider-Man in the past year alone has stolen $6,000 in cash, fought two Captain Americas, been arrested following a robbery and held up a convenience store. Now it appears the wall-crawler has found an ally: Spider-Woman.

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Comics A.M. | TOON Books launches imprint for older readers

Hansel and Gretel

Hansel and Gretel

Publishing | I talked with TOON Books founder Francoise Mouly about her new imprint, TOON Graphics, which will feature “visual books” (picture books and comics) for readers ages 8 and up. The line launches with three titles: Theseus and the Minotaur, by Yves Pommaux, Cast Away on the Letter A, by Fred, and Hansel and Gretel, retold by Neil Gaiman and illustrated by Lorenzo Mattotti. [Publishers Weekly]

Commentary | Former DC Comics senior editor Joan Hilty tackles the issue of sexism in comics and calls for publishers to include more women in their senior editorial rank:. “Women are getting the bestselling books into stores and greenlighting the million-dollar movie franchises, but they’re barely represented among the creative executives who map out the universes and storytelling strategies. That’s where you cement broad-based, long-term loyalty to authors and characters, tap new audiences and trends, and grow readership, without which none of those books or movies would exist.” [The Guardian]

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Watch Andrew Garfield belt out the Spider-Man cartoon theme

garfield-tonight-show

The Amazing Spider-Man star Andrew Garfield has managed to surprise time and again, whether by melting hearts at Comic-Con International 2011 with a heartfelt speech about what the wall-crawler meant to him as a child, shooting hoops with kids while wearing his movie costume, or making waves by asking why the superhero couldn’t be gay.

And Thursday on The Tonight Show he surprised again with an earnest rendition of the theme song from the 1960s Spider-Man animated series, with a little help from host Jimmy Fallon and the Roots.

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Conversing on Comics with Marcos Martin

MarcosMartin

Marcos Martin grew up reading American superhero comics imported to his native Spain, and for the first 13 years of his career, he lived, breathed and drew those heroes in titles like Batgirl: Year One, Doctor Strange: The Oath, The Amazing Spider-Man and Daredevil. But now he’s moved on, devoting himself primarily to creator-owned comics with a reach beyond the direct market. The first sign of that is The Private Eye, the digital comic he created with celebrated writer Brian K. Vaughan about the price of privacy in a futuristic world.

Both Martin and Vaughan have talked with CBR about their project, so for this installment of “Conversing on Comics” I reached deeper into the artist’s work, looking for his influences and his choices. The interview, conducted in late April via Skype, pulls back the curtain on Martin, an ambitious but private professional who’s looking to entertain not just the ardent comic book fan but also more mainstream readers interested in fiction and fables.

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Quote of the Day | Brian Michael Bendis on diversity in comics

Miles Morales“Sure, there are people who look like Captain America who read comics, but there are very few people in the world who look like Captain America. I go to conventions, and you meet hundreds of people over the course of the day, and no two of them look alike. You see women and people of color who love comics, and there’s nothing representing them in a way that isn’t sexualized or something.

“Now, you can’t make these decisions [to be more inclusive] consciously, because then you’re just writing in reaction to things, and that doesn’t work out, dramatically. But subconsciously, if you look at the world around you and see your readers, you go, I wanna write something that I know is true. So you start writing women better and you write people outside of your experience better, because you look at pages of other people’s comics and you don’t recognize it as the world around you.”

— writer Brian Michael Bendis, in an interview with Vulture in which he also discusses why Spider-Man was a multicultural hero even when he was Peter Parker


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