Steve Epting Archives - Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

Comics A.M. | Injured ‘Spider-Man’ dancer makes public appearance

Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark

Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark

Stage | Dancer Daniel Curry, who was seriously injured during an Aug. 15 performance of the Broadway musical Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark, made his first appearance since the accident at a benefit concert held Monday that raised $10,000 for his medical bills. Curry was injured when his leg was pinned by an automated trap door — he blames malfunctioning equipment, producers say it was human error — resulting in fractured legs and a fractured foot; he has undergone surgeries and unspecified amputations. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration and Actors’ Equity have launched investigations into the accident, and Curry’s lawyers are exploring a possible lawsuit against the $75 million show and the equipment suppliers.

During previews of Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark — before the March 2011 firing of director Julie Taymor and the sweeping overhaul that followed — no fewer than five performers were injured, the most serious previously being aerialist Christopher Tierney, who fell about 30 feet in December 2010, breaking four ribs and fracturing three vertebrae. He returned to rehearsals four months later. There have been no major accidents since the show opened in June 2011. [The New York Times]

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Food or Comics? | Black beans or Black Beetle

Welcome to Food or Comics?, where every week we talk about what comics we’d buy at our local comic shop based on certain spending limits — $15 and $30 — as well as what we’d get if we had extra money or a gift card to spend on a splurge item.

Check out Diamond’s release list or ComicList, and tell us what you’re getting in our comments field.

Black Beetle: No Way Out #1

J.K. Parkin

If I had $15, I’d start with Black Beetle #1 (Dark Horse, $3.99), Francesco Francavilla’s pulp action hero who jumps into his own miniseries after a run in Dark Horse Presents. I’d also grab Threshold #1 (DC Comics, $2.99), which continues the story from last week’s New Guardians annual, featuring a new Green Lantern and a whole bunch of cosmic DC characters. I’d also grab Comeback #3 (Image, $3.50), as I just got around to reading the first issue and really enjoyed it. They’re doing some fun stuff with time travel that should make for a cool series. That leaves room for one more, which is a hard choice … but let’s go with Indestructible Hulk #3 (Marvel, $3.99), because I love the new direction and take on the character and his status quo.

If I had $30, I’d also pick up Saga #9 (Image, $2.99) and Daredevil #22 ($2.99), because, well, Saga and Daredevil. I’m also really digging what Kelly Sue Deconnick is doing with the Avengers, so next I’d get Avengers Assemble #11 (Marvel, $3.99). Lastly, I’d grab Captain America #3 (Marvel, $3.99), as I’m really worried about Cap and the kid, and hope they come out of Zola’s world OK.

Finally, for my spulrge, I’d go with the big Paul Pope book from Image, One Trick Rip-Off ($29.99).

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What Are You Reading? with Brian Cronin

Mara #1

Hello and welcome to What Are You Reading?, where we take a look at the comics, books and other things the Robot 6 crew have been reading lately. We kick off the new year with Brian Cronin from Comics Should Be Good! as our special guest. In addition to running our sister blog, Brian is also an author, having written two books on comics trivia. He also runs the blog Urban Legends Revealed, where he talks about sports and entertainment urban legends.

To see what Brian and the Robot 6 crew have been reading, click below …

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Food or Comics? | Happy New Potatoes!

Welcome to Food or Comics?, where every week we talk about what comics we’d buy at our local comic shop based on certain spending limits — $15 and $30 — as well as what we’d get if we had extra money or a gift card to spend on a splurge item.

Check out Diamond’s release list or ComicList, and tell us what you’re getting in our comments field.

The Chimpanzee Complex

Chris Arrant

If I had $15, I’d start the new year off right with Invincible #99 (Image, $2.99). The build-up (or teardown?) to Issue 100 has been great, and honestly I never quite trusted Dinosaurus to begin with so I’m glad to see this finally boil over. I’m all ears – and eyes – for this and the next issue. Next up I’d get another Image joint, Prophet #32 (Image, $3.99). Kudos to Brandon Graham for being confident in himself enough – and choosy enough in his collaborators – that he’s stepping back and letting artist Simon Roy write and draw a one-off issue. And the story of a Prophet clone gone native sounds mighty enticing. Third in this week’s haul would be Punk Rock Jesus #6 (DC/Vertigo, $2.99). I feel a slight bit of remorse at how fast this series has gone – it seemed like a whole lot of introduction, a brief second act and now we’re being pushed into the finale. Still, one of the best series of 2012 (with this finale sneaking out two days after 2012). Finally, I’d get James Stokoe’s Godzilla: Half-Century War #4 (IDW, $3.99). I’ve become big fans of Ota and Kentaro here, and Stokoe has really populated this world with all kinds of special and grotesque. Excited to see what comes up here!

If I had $30, I’d continue my mad dash through my local comic shop with two Marvel picks: All New X-Men #5 (Marvel, $3.99) and New Avengers #1 (Marvel, $3.99). All-New X-Men has been surprisingly refreshing for me; I always love Stuart Immonen’s, but what’s startled me is how fresh and unencumbered Brian Bendis seems here with the writing. On the New Avengers #1 tip, I liked Hickman’s other Avengers work so far but I’m even more interested in how artist Steve Epting draws this unique cast. Plus, I loved Epting’s first run on Avengers – leather jackets, people! Next up I’d return to Image and get Glory #31 (Image, $3.99). This is going to be a great collection when the whole thing is done, but right now we’re knee-deep in the series itself as Glory faces off with her sister Silverfall. Hey Rob Liefeld – this Silverfall character could be something special for more after this series ends! And finally, I’d get Manhattan Projects #8 (Image, $3.50) and anxiously await the big reveal of the secret powerbrokers in the MP universe. I can’t wait for Hickman to blow my mind.

If I could splurge, I’d buy the back-to-back first and second volume of Chimpanzee Complex (#13.95 each, Cinebook). Coming to America with no press at all, I found this in Previews a while back and have been excited by its potential: a Franco-Belgian comic that reveals the astronauts who returned from the moon in 1969 were doppelgangers, and the fallout from that discovery. 2010 meets Orbiter. Bring it on.

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Did Marvel just reveal part of New Avengers lineup?

From Skottie Young's "New Avengers" variant cover

While Marvel revealed most of the sprawling lineup for Jonathan Hickman and Jerome Opeña’s Avengers last week with Dustin Weaver’s interlocking covers for the first three issues, it has remained tight-lipped about the roster of the companion title New Avengers. But did the publisher just give away part of the team with one of the new Marvel NOW! variants?

Among the covers debuted by Marvel Senior Vice President of Sales David Gabriel on the Diamond Comic Distributors retailer website is a new Baby variant by Skottie Young (above) featuring pint-sized versions of Black Bolt, Black Panther, Iron Man and Mister Fantastic. Decked out in his white Future Foundation costume, a displeased lil’ Reed says, “Seriosly [sic], guys? A simple memo on uniform colors would’ve been nice,” suggesting they are indeed part of a team. Of the four heroes, only Black Bolt — the ruler of the Inhumans whose voice can level cities — has never served as an Avenger.

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What Are You Reading? with Paul Allor

Happy Labor Day, Americans, and welcome, everybody, to What Are You Reading? Today our special guest is Paul Allor, writer of IDW’s Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles spinoff, Fugitoid, as well as his own anthology Clockwork.

To see what Paul and the Robot 6 crew have been reading, click below:

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What Are You Reading?

Saga #1

Hello and welcome to What Are You Reading?, our weekly look at what the Robot 6 crew have been checking out recently. To see for yourself, click below …

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Chain Reactions | Fantastic Four #600

Fantastic Four #600

(Please note: Clicking on just about any of the links in this post will take you directly to spoilers for Fantastic Four #600.)

This week saw Marvel revert back to the original numbering for their flagship title, Fantastic Four, as they released the 600th issue of the “World’s Greatest Comic Magazine.” The $7.99, 96-page comic contains five stories, all written by Jonathan Hickman and drawn by a variety of artists, including Steve Epting, Rick Magyar, Carmine Di Giandomenico, Ming Doyle, Leinil Francis Yu, Gerry Alanguilan and Farel Dalrymple.

And just like they’ve done in the past, Marvel spoiled one of the plot points from the book in order to get mainstream media attention. One of the plot points, anyway; when Hickman was asked on Twitter about a particular article that contained a major spoiler, he replied, “… I haven’t read that article, so I’m not sure ‘which’ spoiler is being spoiled.” Yep, this comic book is just packed.

Here’s a sampling of what folks have been saying about Fantastic Four #600:

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Marko Djurdjevic ends Marvel deal, blasts editors [Updated]

FF #1, Marko Djurdjevic

If you’re breathlessly awaiting for more Marvel work from Marko Djurdjevic, you may be disappointed. The acclaimed artist, known for his character designs and for his covers for FF, Daredevil and Thor, revealed last night at FanExpo Canada that he’s ended his exclusive contract with the publisher — a split that apparently couldn’t come soon enough for Djurdjevic.

“When I get hired for movie work or video game work, I get hired for my creativity,” Djurdjevic said in the ironically named “Team Spirit” panel. “At Marvel, I get hired for what they know sells. It’s really just a pigeon hole for an artist.”

According to the Comic Book Resources report, softspoken FF artist Steve Epting stood in stark contrast to a joking yet visibly frustrated Djurdjevic, who complained about interference from Marvel editors and repeated requests for revisions without additional pay. “I was fighting with the guys at Marvel about this,” he said. “You can’t make people re-work your shit because you can’t decide what you want. Either pay or leave.” After showing the audience numerous mock-ups for his redesign of Lady Bullseye — mocking editors’ comments in high-pitched tones — Djurdjevic added, “When they would not interfere with my direction, they would get results that would amaze even me.”

He didn’t restrict his criticism to the editors, however. Asked by Epting whether he wished he’d done more interior work at Marvel, Djurdjevic replied, “They never put me with any writers that I liked.” From there, CBR reports, he launched into a tirade about the company and fired a few shots at former Thor writer J. Michael Straczynski, who he said writes “like toilet paper.”

Read full coverage of the “Team Spirit” panel at Comic Book Resources. FanExpo Canada continues in Toronto through Sunday.

Note: The post has been edited to reflect that Djurdjevic was actually criticizing J. Michael Straczynski, not Duane Swierczynski.

Creators, fans and friends remember Gene Colan

Gene Colan at WonderCon 2007 (photo by Chip Mosher)

As CBR reported last night, comics creator and Eisner winner Gene Colan passed away at the age of 84 last night.

“The legacy of his artistic storytelling and abilities played a key role in cementing the enduring popularity of characters like Daredevil, Iron Man, Howard the Duck, Blade and Dr. Strange, and garnered him praise and fans the world over,” columnist George Khoury said in an obituary on Comic Book Resources this morning.

In lieu of flowers, Colan’s friend Clifford Meth is asking folks to contribute to a scholarship being set up in Colan’s name for The Kubert School. Details on how to donate can be found on Meth’s blog.

Fellow creators, fans and friends of Gene Colan are sharing memories. Here are a few; as always, click through to see the entirety of what they have to say about one of comics’ legendary artists:

Clifford Meth: “I knew this day would come but it came too quickly. It’s been a rare pleasure working with Gene. He knew who he was—how valuable his contributions to the world of comic art have been—how prized it remains by so many. Yet he never felt less than grateful to anyone who’d even read a single panel that he’d drawn. Until he was too weak to hold a pencil, he put his whole kishkes into everything he drew—whether it was a $5000 commission or a small drawing for someone’s child. And he was never satisfied with his artwork but always eager to learn a little more, do a little better, try something new. At 84.”

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Food or Comics? | This week’s comics on a budget

Flashpoint #1

Welcome to Food or Comics?, where every week we talk about what comics we’d buy on Wednesday based on certain spending limits — $15 and $30 — as well as what we’d get if we had extra money or a gift card to spend on a “Splurge” item.

Check out Diamond’s release list or ComicList if you’d like to play along in our comments section.

Graeme McMillan

If I had $15 this week, I’d immediately go for Flashpoint #1 (DC Comics, $3.99) – I am very, very unsure about the number of tie-ins DC are pushing out for the new crossover event, but with Geoff Johns in charge, I’m suspecting that the main book will be worth a look at least. I’d also grab the relaunched GI Joe #1 (IDW, $3.99), if only to follow up on the “Cobra Civil War” storyline that I admit has completely caught my attention unexpectedly. Curiosity would also get me to pick up both Moriarty #1 (Image, $2.99) and Total Recall #1 (Dynamite, $1.99), two new launches that will hopefully take familiar ideas and characters in directions I wouldn’t expect…

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The Fifth Color | The Value of One

Be free, my comic book brother!

I hope this isn't like nails on a chalkboard to anyone

I hate polybags.

The very idea of selling a comic in thick, super-sealed plastic really bothers me. It’s hard to find a reason for them besides keeping you from reading the comic inside. If you want them to be protected, a bag and a board would do better. If you were preserving them for posterity or value, send them to the CGC. Even if you want something like a ‘slipcover’ for your book, something that would hide the actual cover to preserve the front-facing artwork, a stiff sort of outer cover would probably hold up a lot better.

That polybag is going to get ruined if all goes well. The first thing I did when I got the book is cut the darn thing open. OH NO THE VALUE HAS DROPPED! I actually lowered the value of my comic because I tried to read it; essentially, by getting to the value of the book (story, art, content) I ruined its value (collectability, condition). Weird, ain’t it?

So, is this book still valuable?

Well, as in the above, there are different kinds of value to different kinds of people. Not just collectability and content, there are even different levels to how readers approach a story that will calculate its essential worth as opposed to the collector, who will inevitably realize that Fantastic Four #587 will only be worth as much as other people invest into it. That’s the thing about collectibles: anyone can save something forever, it’s just when other people didn’t save that one thing and really want it later on in life that it gets seen on Auction Kings. Just because you saved eight long boxes of Deathmate Black doesn’t mean someone wants to pay you money for them.

There’s been media buzz, people who don’t normally talk about comics have talked about this comic in particular, it’s in a polybag, inside there’s a secret that everyone wants to know the answer to, tons of outside qualities to make Fantastic Four #587 memorable to the public. All of these things are externally tough, and it really takes taking a pair of collapsible knitting scissors to find the real gold in Jonathan Hickman’s web of comic book storytelling. Is this web impenetrable? Is it expertly woven? Is this an organic web or are they self-invented? Click below and find out!

(WARNING:   Guys, I can’t even say there are spoilers for this. Marvel themselves totally revealed who exactly it was who died online, so if you’re reading an online Marvel comics column, you probably know by now.  If it helps, I don’t say the name of who exactly it is or describe the Big Event, and this should help you explain what all this is to people who haven’t read it, so … I guess I’ll be talking about Fantastic Four #587. Be warned?)

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Six by 6 | Six CrossGen series we’d like to see return in 2011

Sojourn

Sojourn

Today’s Marvel announcement, regarding its intention to utilize CrossGen’s concepts at least partially in an attempt to do “a little more genre publishing” in 2011, was rather lean in terms of details. But don’t think that stopped Michael May and myself from compiling a Six by 6 list of CrossGen series we’d like to see return (in some form) and the folks we’d like to see creating them. As always with these lists, we’d love to read your input for what CrossGen properties and/or creators you’d like to see return in 2011.

1. Sojourn. Remember when everyone loved Greg Land? I do, because Sojourn was my favorite CrossGen series and apparently a lot of other people liked it too since it was one of the last to be canceled by the spiraling company. Arwen was a gorgeous, badass hero with a cool dog and a quest to collect five shards of a magic arrow that could kill the evil sorceror Mordath. It sounds like standard fantasy stuff, but Land’s detailed, realistic artwork (no one accused him of tracing back then) brought it to life. He wasn’t solely responsible for its success though. Ron Marz’s writing elevated the characters and situations from genre cliches to honest tragedy and human stories. I’d love it if Marvel could get him back on the book. Land too, if he can still produce the kind of work he did back in the day. (Michael May)

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Straight for the art | Fight!

by Steve Epting

by Steve Epting

If you’re going to HeroesCon today, look for artist Steve Epting at table AA-301. He’ll be selling the above Captain America WWII-style propaganda poster at the show.

Straight for the art | Steve Epting’s Frankenstein

Frankenstein

Frankenstein

Artist Steve Epting shares this killer Frankenstein piece on his blog, noting Frank’s a little late for Halloween. Well, he does walk slow…


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