superheroes Archives - Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

The business cards of 34 famous comic book alter egos

super-cards

Just because your identity is a secret doesn’t mean it has to be boring, as Pop Chart Lab demonstrates in its new print “The Vocations of Heroes and Villains.”

Measuring 24 inches by 18 inches, the print imagines the business cards of the alter egos of 34 DC Comics and Marvel heroes and villains, from Billy Batson to Jessica Jones and Adrian Veidt to Norman Osborn. They’re sharp-looking, even if a couple of them probably aren’t all that necessary (for instance, Victor Von Doom’s says “Absolute Monarch” while T’Challa’s says “King’).

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Stan Lee, Michael Uslan team for online course on superheroes

EdX Smithsonian Institution

Stan Lee will join Batman producer Michael Uslan for a free online course that explores the history of comic books and superheroes.

Offered by edX and the Smithsonian Institution, “The Rise of Superheroes and Their Impact On Pop Culture” examines the factors that led to the Golden Age of comics, the ebb and flow of the genre, the scares of the 1950s, the acceptance of comic books as an artform, and the current popularity of superheroes in television, film and video games.

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Superheroes reimagined with realistic body types

bulimia-power girl

Fans and critics have long discussed and debated the unrealistic bodies of comic book superheroes, from gravity-defying breasts and tiny waists to bulging biceps and washboard abs. However, now Bulimia.com has done what it refers to as “reverse Photoshopping of comic covers,” and given the superheroes bodies that reflect average American body types.

“Today, 33.7% of men and 36.5% of women in the U.S. are considered obese, and more than two-thirds are overweight,” explains the website, a resource for people with eating disorders. “Weight gain has put millions of people at risk of heart disease, diabetes, and other preventable conditions.Meanwhile, comic books depict vastly different figures: men with massive biceps and shoulders and women with toned abs and tiny waists.”

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Makeup artist transforms people into living comic book heroes

moseley-shehulk

A self-trained makeup artist, Lianne Moseley of Calgary makes her living working with brides and models. However, she recently expanded her repertoire to include transforming people into superheroes who look as if they’ve stepped right off the comic book page.

“When I first did Archer, I posted it on my Facebook page and my friends liked it but I didn’t have a big following but my brother really liked it and he posted it on Reddit,” Moseley, a comics fan herself, tells CTV News. “Just last night Ashton Kutcher shared an article on my work on his Facebook page.”

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Photos reveal the everyday lives of superhero action figures

hrjoe-pee break

While some people are satisfied to let their pricey high-end action figures gather dust, photographer Edy Hardjo puts his to good use, creating a frequently hilarious (and occasionally not exactly work-safe) glimpse into the everyday lives of superheroes.

On his Instagram and Facebook pages, Hardjo reveals Avengers hazing rituals, hairstyle mishaps, campfire memories, juvenile pranks, and a reminder of why you don’t want to ride in an elevator with Ghost Rider.

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Girl who asked DC for more superheroines becomes one herself

dc-rowan-cropped

Eleven-year-old Rowan Hansen attracted a lot of attention online last month for her letter asking DC Entertainment to “please do something” about the lack of comics, movies and toys featuring female superheroes. The publisher responded, tweeting, “We agree, we’re working hard to create more superhero fun for girls!.”

However, DC didn’t leave it at that.

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Danish officials foil man’s bid to change name to Superhero

herbst-superhero

Danish officials have dashed the hopes of a Copenhagen toy store owner who wanted to call himself Superhero. However, like a true superhero, he isn’t giving up without a fight.

BBC News reports that 26-year-old Benjamin Preisler Herbst hoped to tack “Superhero” onto the beginning of his name, as so much of his life revolves around comic book characters. But after a four-month review, authorities rejected his request, writing, “The word superhero is a term for a fictional/non-existent figure. We don’t believe that Superhero lives up to the criteria for being approved as a boy’s name.”

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Quote of the Day | Alex Ross on reinventing superheroes

superman-alex ross“The intent of [many of] the companies is redesign, reinvent, for a modern readership who want their own version of a thing as opposed to their grandfather’s version of a thing.

I’ve always thought there’s a beautiful eloquence of having a connection to something that was designed 50, 60, 75 years ago, that is essentially undiluted. They don’t need to be over-altered for the sake of upcoming generations. They don’t have to be unified.

If you have to always make characters younger because, ‘well, young people won’t connect with older protagonists,’ well, that is such horseshit.”

Alex Ross, lamenting the desire of some publishers to remake superheroes for a modern audience, in the same piece in which he says he’s learned not to get too attached to certain depictions of characters: “If you start thinking that your version of a thing is the most popular, beloved version, then when they go a different way, as they have with their version of Superman today, it breaks your heart.”

Volkswagen Buses rock superhero makeovers in poster set

vw-heroes1

Artist Chung Kong celebrates superheroes and the classic Volkswagen Microbus in a pretty amazing poster series called “It’s Love That Gave Me Superpower!” It seems a fitting fitting for a vehicle that’s seen its fare share of love-ins and Grateful Dead concerts.

Kong reimagines the vans as if they were driven by such superheroes as Wonder Woman, The Thing, Superman and Captain America, with paint jobs and vanity plates to match their owners (Wonder Woman’s reads “Diana1941,” The Thing’s “Ben 1961,” and so on”).

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Comics A.M. | Trudeau addresses ‘Doonesbury’s’ UVA strip

Doonesbury

Doonesbury

Creators | Garry Trudeau has some straight talk for those who criticized him for basing Sunday’s Doonesbury on the controversial Rolling Stone expose of the University of Virginia’s handling of rape cases — or thought maybe the strip was submitted before a number of commentators cast doubt on the lead anecdote in that article. The cartoonist insists that’s not the point: “We had some internal discussion about whether the flaws in the [Rolling Stone] reporting mattered here, and we concluded they didn’t. UVA is only used as setup to get the reader to consider the larger problem of institutions prioritizing their reputations over the welfare of those they’re charged with safeguarding.” [Comic Riffs]

Comics | Writer James Patrick’s new publishing startup 21 Pulp is profiled in the local newspaper. [The Marietta Times]

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Comics A.M. | How one manga publisher is expanding into China

Kodansha's Jinmanhua magazine

Kodansha’s Jinmanhua magazine

Publishing | Keiko Yoshioka explains how Japanese publisher Kodansha is getting into the Chinese market, not by selling Japanese products but by publishing a magazine in China that’s geared toward Chinese audiences — and using Chinese creators as well. The article puts a special focus on the two-woman team known as Navar, whose suspense series Carrier: Xiedaizhe now runs in Japan as well. [The Asahi Shimbun]

Academia | Northwestern University Prof. Irving Rein discusses why superheroes have secret identities, ticking off several superhero comics tropes and then going a bit deeper: “The usual script of a superhero episode revolves around a threat occurring in which the superhero is the victim of the decision making of the criminals. The hidden identity is a standard form of the superhero narrative and it allows the creators to use the formula and still deviate from the script. Throughout the comic book or movie there are a series of fundamental questions. Will the superhero be identified? When and under what circumstances will the superhero become a superhero? How will the superhero get back into his civilian identity without being identified?” [Daily Herald]

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Comics A.M. | Indianapolis Star pulls cartoon after backlash

The original version of Gary Varvel's cartoon

The original version of Gary Varvel’s cartoon

Editorial cartoons | The Indianapolis Star first altered a cartoon by Gary Varvel and then removed it from its website after receiving an outpouring of protests from readers. The cartoon, a reaction to President Obama’s executive actions delaying deportations, showed a white family sitting around a Thanksgiving table, looking in horror as brown-skinned people, presumably immigrants, climbed in the window. The caption was “Thanks to the president’s immigration order, we’ll be having extra guests this Thanksgiving.” “Gary did not intend to be racially insensitive in his attempt to express his strong views about President Barack Obama’s decision to temporarily prevent the deportation of millions of immigrants living and working illegally in the United States,” Executive Editor Jeff Taylor said in a post explaining the removal of the cartoon. “But we erred in publishing it.” Tom Spurgeon offers some commentary. [Indianapolis Star]

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It’s superheroes vs. game heroes in brutal fight for the Tesseract

super-vs-games

Putting a new spin on the Marvel vs. Capcom formula, this short from CorridorDigital pits superheroes against video game heroes when Minecraft Steve discovers the powerful Tesseract.

“In the hands of mortals, the Tesseract will only cause great harm,” Thor warns — and he turns out to be right, as what follows is a brutal, bloody brawl, involving Captain America, Wolverine, Ash Ketchum, Alyx Vance, Master Chief, the thunder god and, yes, Steve.

Poor Ash didn’t stand a chance, although Steve handles himself surprisingly well …

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Photographs transport superheroes back to 16th century

sacha goldberger7

French photographer Sacha Goldberger, who previously made a splash with images of his 91-year-old grandmother as a superhero, exhibited his latest series “Super Flemish” over the weekend at the Grand Palais in Paris. As you might have guessed from the title and the above photo, the project features superheroes (and villains), Star Wars characters and other pop-culture figures — as if they were posing for Flemish paintings.

But these are indeed photographs, requiring models, costumers, hair and makeup artists and the like. And, as you can see from the gallery on Goldberger’s website, he even recruited his grandmother again. See more images, and photos from the exhibition, on Goldberger’s Facebook page.

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Comics A.M. | ‘Big Hero 6′ drives up prices on original comics

Sunfire & Big Hero 6 #1

Sunfire & Big Hero 6 #1

Comics | Check your longboxes, folks: Copies of Marvel’s Sunfire & Big Hero 6 #1, from 1998, with a CGC grade of 9.8 are selling for $450 and up ahead of the premiere of the Disney animated film, and even non-graded copies are good for $25 or more. [ICv2]

Creators | Captain Marvel writer Kelly Sue DeConnick talks about the character, and her reaction to the newly announced Marvel film: “I feel so proud of her, like Carol is this person who lives in my head, and ‘look what you did, girl!’ It feels like a friend just got a promotion.” [Speakeasy]

Publishing | Chris Butcher announced that, after three years as marketing director, he’s left UDON Entertainment to focus more fully on his work for the Toronto store The Beguiling (where he’s manager) and the Toronto Comic Arts Festival (where he’s festival director). [Comics212]

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