The Crow Archives - Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

Comics-inspired typographic prints might look good on your wall

poster-flash

Comics fans searching for a visually bold yet affordable way to liven up a room may find something that suits their tastes, and their budgets, from GeekMyWall, which offers a line of striking typographic posters inspired by comics characters.

Harley Quinn, Batman, Green Lantern, Rorschach, V — they’re all represented in prints beginning at 11 inches by 17 inches or $25. Each figure is created from character-appropriate quotes. For instance, Wonder Woman is, “Of all people, you know who I am … …who the world needs me to be. I’m Wonder Woman.” And The Flash: “‘I’m getting lectured on child safety from a man who’s gone through four Robins?”

They’re also available as T-shirts. And if the comic characters aren’t for you, there are plenty of television- and movie-themed options.

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SDCC ’13 | James O’Barr creates ‘The Crow’ movie teaser poster

crow-movie-poster-cropped

Horror site Shock Till You Drop has revealed the Comic-Con International teaser poster for Relativity Media’s long-brewing reboot of The Crow, illustrated by the comic’s creator James O’Barr.

Although project has had a bumpy road, losing its director, writer and star, it appears back on track with confirmation earlier this month that director F. Javier Gutierrez and actor Luke Evans are locked in, with O’Barr serving as creative consultant.

“It’s one of those books,” the artist tells the website. “The book’s been in print since ’89, so it’s getting close to 30 years. I thought all of my fans will grow old with me and that will be the end of it. But no, it gets passed down generation to generation. It’s still, to this day, fully 60 percent of my core audience is 16-year-old goth girls and I’m like, ‘You weren’t even born when it came out, how do you know about it?’  And they’re boyfriend suggested it to them or their dad introduced it to them. A second generation is affected by it.”

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Comics A.M. | ‘No Straight Lines’ wins Lambda Literary Award

No Straight Lines

No Straight Lines

Awards | Editor Justin Hall won the 2013 Lambda Literary Award for best anthology for his No Straight Lines: Four Decades of Queer Comics, marking the first time a graphic novel has been honored in that category. Now in their 25th year, the Lambda Literary Awards recognize the best in lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender literature. “”I’m thrilled that the Lambdas have made such a strong statement recognizing comics as a legitimate literary medium that has told powerful stories of LGBT lives, loves, and identities for the last four decades,” Hall said. “This is a validation of a tremendous amount of work, and of an artistic community that truly deserves its time in the spotlight!” [San Francisco Guardian]

Events | Calvin Reid writes the most comprehensive report yet on the comics scene at last week’s BookExpo America. [Publishers Weekly]

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James O’Barr returns to comics with The Crow: Skinning the Wolves

Acclaimed artist James O’Barr returns to his most famous creation in December with The Crow: Skinning the Wolves, a three-issue miniseries from IDW Publishing.

Debuting in 1989, The Crow centered on a young musician who’s killed while trying save his fiancee from street thugs, only to be resurrected by supernatural forces. He seeks vengeance against his murderers, methodically stalking the thugs and killing them. The hit comic inspired a critically and commercially successful 1994 film, which spawned three movie sequels and a short-lived television series.

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Comics A.M. | Alan Moore to make rare convention appearance

Alan Moore

Creators | Alan Moore will make a rare convention appearance in September — his first in 25 years, according to this article — at the inaugural Northants International Comics Expo in Northamptonshire, England. To attend Moore’s hour-long talk on writing comics or the hour-long question-and-answer session, convention-goers are required to donate graphic novels to the Northamptonshire Libraries, which will have a table at the event. [Stumptown Trade Review]

Creators | Mark Waid gets the NPR treatment, as Noah J. Nelson interviews him about his digital comics initiatives. “I got news for you: I’ve been doing this for 25 years, and this is the hardest writing I’ve ever had to do,” Waid says of creating digital comics. [NPR]

Publishing | Abrams ComicArts editorial director Charles Kochman discusses the publisher’s spring lineup, which will include William Stout’s Legends of the Blues, Darryl Cunningham’s What the Frack, a history of Bazooka Joe comics, and a Will Eisner artbook written by Paul Levitz. [ICv2]

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IDW evokes ’80s and ’90s nostalgia with Battle Beasts and The Crow

It’s 2012, I’m 35 years old and I’m reading two new comic book series, both based on decades-old intellectual properties for which I had a great interest in, and rather intense feelings about, at different points in my childhood.  This is in no way unusual: Every line of toys, every cartoon series or TV show, every movie I was into at some point in my childhood now exists as a comic book and, in most cases, rebooted toys, cartoons, TV shows and movies. For children of the 1970s and 1980s, our entertainment franchises have grown up with us.

What’s slightly unusual about Battle Beasts and The Crow is how relatively obscure they are, compared to the Godzillas, Star Wars and G.I. Joes.

It’s 1987, I’m 10 years old and I don’t know it yet, but I’m reaching the end of the period in my life in which I can play with toys, in which I can easily slip into a time-stopped world of pure imagination and see characters appear and dramas unfold based on nothing more than some small piece of plastic, molded into He-Man or Boba Fett.

A friend comes over to play with me, and we divide our mixed lines of action figures — Transformers, Ghostbusters, Masters of the Universe, etc. — into teams that will build bases and battle one another. He has something new with him called “Battle Beasts.”

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IDW shares a murder of Crow pages

The Crow

Somehow I missed the news that Fishtown creator Kevin Colden is drawing The Crow for IDW, whcih is good news indeed. Colden is working with writer John Shirley, who wrote the first draft of the screenplay for the first Crow movie back in the 1990s. If you’re interested in seeing what it will look like, IDW posted a whole bunch of pages over on their Tumblr, including both covers by Kyle Hotz and Ashley Wood.

WonderCon | A round-up of announcements from Sunday

X-Men

There wasn’t as much news coming out of WonderCon today compared to Friday and Saturday, but there were a few announcements:

• Marvel announced that Wolverine & the X-Men: Alpha & Omega, The Massive and Conan the Barbarian writer Brian Wood will take over writing both X-Men and Ultimate X-Men. About the latter, he told CBR, “I can bring something to the table here, a certain POV that I think will work really well. At its core it’s still the same mutant/human conflict, but the stakes are incredibly high and with the Ultimate line having more leeway than 616, you can really push it to the edge, and over the edge. With my stories, I’m looking forward to having them push back against this repression in a major way — not just in one-on-one cases but as a collective whole, a unified mutant push for freedom, for safety, for basic human rights. For the right to be a mutant and live free. What’s happening to them now is essentially a genocide, an ethnic cleansing.”

• Marvel also announced a new Dark Avengers series by Jeff Parker, Kev Walker and Declan Shalvey that replaces Thunderbolts. The book will feature Dark Scarlet Witch, Dark Spider-Man, Trickshot, Ragnarok and Skaar, along with Luke Cage.

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SDCC ’11 | The Crow returns at IDW

IDW Publishing announced yesterday at the San Diego Comic-Con plans to bring James O’Barr’s The Crow back into print, both in new comics and in collector’s editions of the older material.

According to the press release, IDW will produce several comics series in the universe of The Crow comics and based on the upcoming feature film. “I’m glad to see The Crow land at IDW,” said Ted Adams, the company’s co-founder and chief executive officer. “I edited the last Crow series when I ran Todd McFarlane’s comics in the late ‘90’s, and we’re looking forward to bringing this classic character back to the medium in 2012 at IDW.”

Published by Caliber Press in the late 1980s, the comic has appeared from many different publishers over the years, including Kitchen Sink Press, London Night Studios, Random House and Image Comics. It was adapted into film in 1994, spawning three sequels and a television series. The story revolves around Eric Draven and his girlfriend, who are attacked by a group of thugs when their car breaks down. After both are beaten and killed, Draven is resurrected and seeks revenge.


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