Tintin Archives - Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

Court rules Moulinsart doesn’t own all the Tintin rights

tintin

Surprising virtually everyone, a Dutch court has ruled that Moulinsart SA, which fiercely protects Herge’s creations, doesn’t actually own all the rights to Tintin.

Agence France-Presse reports the commercial and copyright arm of the Herge Foundation had sued a small Dutch fan club in 2012, claiming it failed to secure the rights to republish Tintin art in one of its fanzines. However, what might’ve seemed like a fairly straightforward case of copyright versus fair use was turned on its ear when the attorney for the Herge Society fan club produced a 1942 document in which the author signed over Tintin’s publishing rights to his publisher Casterman.

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Tintin is often knocked out but never motion sick, study finds

tintin

Despite suffering a staggering 244 health issues over the course of his nearly five-decade career, Tintin has demonstrated an “almost superhuman” resistance to trauma.

That’s the conclusion made by a group of physicians from the Sorbonne University in Paris and the University of Atlanta following a detailed analysis of 23 of the boy reporter’s 24 adventures.

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Tintin takes flight, on the side of a Brussels Airlines jet

brussels airlines-tintin3

Brussels Airlines has repainted an Airbus A320 to resemble the famous shark-shaped submarine from Herge’s 1944 album Red Rackham’s Treasure to serve as an ambassador of Belgium.

Rechristened Rackham, the jet depicts boy reporter Tintin and his faithful dog Snowy looking from the “submarine’s” cockpit; the image is accompanied by the slogan “Brussels Airlines — We fly you to the home of Tintin.”

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Store briefly removes ‘Tintin in America’ after racism complaint

tintin in americaA Chapters bookstore in Winnipeg temporarily removed Herge’s Tintin in America on Saturday following a complaint by a First Nations educator that the comic contains “racist images.” However, CBC News reports the book had been returned to shelves by Monday, after the chain determined its content doesn’t violate the company’s policy.

Serialized from September 1931 to October 1932, Tintin in America chronicles the adventures of the boy reporter and his dog Snowy as they investigate organized crime in Chicago and pursue mob boss Bobby Smiles West to “Redskin City,” becoming captives of an easily manipulated Blackfoot tribe in the process.

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Comics A.M. | Sotheby’s comics art auction rings up $4.1 million

The Rocketeer, by Dave Stevens

The Rocketeer, by Dave Stevens

Auctions | Sotheby’s auction of comics and comics art over the weekend in Paris brought in about $4.1 million for 189 works, including Hergé’s cover art for the 10th-anniversary issue of Le Petit Vingtième (the magazine where Tintin first ran), several Tintin pages, and pieces by Hugo Pratt, Charles Burns and Osamu Tezuka. An acrylic and crayon illustration by Dave Stevens created in 1988 for the first issue of The Rocketeer Adventure Magazine (at right) fetched $66,017, a record for the late artist’s work. [Paul Gravett, Artnet]

Creators | “Hobbes was as much my alter-ego as Calvin was”: In an excerpt from the new book Exploring Calvin and Hobbes, Bill Watterson talks about how he came to comics, how he developed the style and characters of Calvin and Hobbes, and the continuing popularity of the strip years after it stopped running in newspapers. [Comic Riffs]

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‘Tintin’ cover sells for near-record $2.8 million at auction

tintin-shooting star-colorThe original cover for the 1942 Tintin book The Shooting Star sold at auction for more than $2.8 million, just shy of the record price paid last year for a piece of Hergé’s art.

Comic book dealers Petits Papiers-Huberty-Breyne told Agence France-Presse the yellowing art was purchased by a European investor who “is neither Belgian nor French.” No other details about the buyer’s identity were disclosed.

The Shooting Star cover is one of just five that remains in the hands of private collectors. Most of  Hergé’s work is held by Moulinsart, the Brussels-based organization established in 1987 by the cartoonist’s widow Fanny Rodwell

The 10th volume of The Adventures of Tintin, The Shooting Star follows Tintin, his faithful dog Snowy and his friend Captain Haddock as they take part in a scientific expedition to the Arctic Ocean to find a meteorite before it’s uncovered by a rival team.

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Original ‘Tintin’ cover could fetch as much as $2.9 million

tintin-shooting star-colorHergé’s original cover art for the 1942 Tintin book The Shooting Star is expected to sell for as much as $2.9 million when it goes up for auction at the Brussels Antiques and Fine Arts Fair, which kicks off Saturday in Belgium.

It’s a hefty sum that could rival the record price paid in May for an original double-page spread created by the Belgian artist for the inside covers of Tintin books published between 1937 and 1958. Another drawing of Tintin, created by Hergé in 1939 for the cover of the weekly magazine Le Petit Vingtième, sold last month for $670,000.

Agence France-Presse notes that the Shooting Star cover was one of just five that remains in the hands of private collectors. Most of  Hergé’s work is held by Moulinsart (aka the Hergé Foundation), the Brussels-based organization establshed in 1987 by the cartoonist’s widow Fanny Rodwell. The foundation oversees the Hergé estate as well as the Hergé Museum outside Brussels.

The 10th volume of The Adventures of Tintin, The Shooting Star follows Tintin, his faithful dog Snowy and his friend Captain Haddock as they take part in a scientific expedition to the Arctic Ocean to find a meteorite before it’s uncovered by a rival team.

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Comics A.M. | Rare Tintin drawing sells for $670,000

1939 Tintin drawing by Herge

1939 Tintin drawing by Herge

Auctions | An original 1939 drawing of Tintin created by Herge for the cover of the weekly magazine Le Petit Vingtième sold Sunday for $673,468 at an auction of French and Belgian comics art held simultaneously in Paris and Brussels. The auction featured 101 works, of which 86 were purchased for a total of $2.4 million. [Agence France-Presse]

Auctions | A copy of The Hulk #181, featuring the first appearance of Wolverine, fetched $8,000 at an auction held Saturday at Back to the Past comics store in Redford, Michigan. [My Fox Detroit]

Retailing | System of a Down drummer John Dolmayan, who shuttered his online store Torpedo Comics in 2010 after about three years in business, is looking to open a brick-and-mortar shop. A brief story notes that while Las Vegas store Comic Oasis, owner Derrick Taylor is partnering with Dolmayan to open Torpedo Comics in January at 8775 Lindell Road, Building H, Suite 150. [Vegas Inc.]

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Tintin drawings sell for $2.9 million, setting new world record

tintin-auction

An original page of Tintin drawings signed by Hergé sold at auction Saturday in Paris for nearly $2.9 million, setting a new world record for comic art.

Dating to 1937, the double-page spread featuring the boy reporter, Snowy and other characters (above) was created for the inside covers of Tintin books published between 1937 and 1958. According to Agence France-Press, the piece was purchased by an American collector following “15 minutes of furious bidding” at the Artcurial devoted entirely to the Belgian artist and his most famous creation.

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Belgium’s Ice Magic puts Wolverine, Smurfs and more on ice

wolverine-ice

Captain America is back on ice — along with Spider-Man, Hulk, Asterix and many more at the Ice Magic Festival in Brussels, Belgium.

The exhibit spotlights many characters from around the world, including Belgium’s own Smurfs and Tintin. According to the festival’s website, ice sculptors spent three weeks and 420 tons of natural ice building the exhibit, which also includes an ice slide and bar. The pavilion its in is kept at minus 6°C, which is roughly 21° Fahrenheit.

You can see video from the exhibit, which ends Feb. 9, after the jump, and check out images from it here.

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Quote of the Day | The Great Asterix-Tintin War of 2014

asterix and the picts

“Perhaps it’s simply the appeal of the underdog. Asterix is clearly for children, and for losers: it depicts a world where ungovernable appetites are momentarily sated and fulfilled. Growing up, one knew instinctively that Tintin and his adventures represented a world of adult meanings and responsibilities, unattainable sophistication and privilege. The Tintin books were for the sort of people who went to actual France on actual holidays; the sort of people who might read the books in the original French. Asterix, with its absurd levels of comic-book violence – all those swirling stars and sticking-out tongues, black eyes and bumps to the head – was for anybody and everybody. It was the sort of thing you actually wanted to read. One could imagine a Tintin book as a gift from a benevolent godfather but you discovered Asterix for yourself, well-thumbed and plastic-covered, in the grubby wooden dump-bins of the local library.”

— author Ian Sansom, arguing “why Asterix is better than Tintin” in the New Statesman (if your Twitter feed blew up this morning with U.K. folks drawing lines in the sand, this is why)

Comics A.M. | Online effort raises $5,000 for struggling store

StillPoint Comics, Cards & Games

StillPoint Comics, Cards & Games

Retailing | Fans of the Fall River, Massachusetts, retailer StillPoint Comics, Cards & Games kicked in $5,000 in a GoFundMe campaign to keep the store in business. The shop, which opened in 1997, had to close for 10 days last month after its power was shut off. [The Herald News]

Publishing | Following confirmation last month of a Space Mountain graphic novel series, Heidi MacDonald talks with executives from Disney Publishing Worldwide about the expansion of the new Disney Comics imprint. [Publishers Weekly]

Events | Sean Kleefeld reports on Day 1 of the Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum Grand Opening Festival of Cartoon Art in Columbus, Ohio. [Kleefeld on Comics]

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Paolo Rivera’s Herge-inspired wedding invitation is amazing

rivera-wedding1-cropped

Congratulations to Eisner Award-winning artist Paolo Rivera, who was recently married in grand comic-book style. No, not with a costumed villain crashing the ceremony, but rather with comics-themed accents, from the save-the-date cards and invitations to the cake-topper and name cards — all of which Rivera shows off on his blog.

As the artist’s new wife grew up as a fan of Tintin, he went with a Herge-esque style for the invitation illustration, which features guests ranging from Daredevil and Katniss Everdeen to Optimus Prime and (perhaps best of all) Ellen Ripley in the Power Loader. You can see the full image below, and the rest of the items — including Rivera’s sculpted Psylocke and Wolverine cake-topper — on his blog.

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Comics A.M. | Montreal Comiccon looks to draw 50,000 fans

Montreal Comiccon

Montreal Comiccon

Conventions | More than 50,000 fans are expected this weekend at Montreal Comiccon, where comics guests include Adam Kubert, Andy Belanger, Becky Cloonan, Bob Layton, Chris Claremont, Dale Eaglesham, Dan Parent, David Finch, Karl Kerschl, Mike Grell and Rags Morales.  Last year’s event drew 32,000, but organizers believe the inclusion of celebrity guests will attract significantly more attendees. [Montreal Gazette]

Creators | Artist, writer, and former carnival fire-eater Jim Steranko talks about his career in comics ahead of Nashville Comic Expo, where he will appear this weekend. He talks about learning to read — from comics — when he was a year and a half old, his many adventures outside of comics, and why he chose Nick Fury, Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. when Stan Lee asked him which Marvel comic he would like to work on: “I could have nailed Spider-Man or Thor or the Fantastic Four, but that meant following Kirby. I might be crazy, but I wasn’t stupid. I pointed to Strange Tales and said I’d tackle the S.H.I.E.L.D. series, which was a Marvel embarrassment — the word ‘wretched’ comes to mind. I didn’t mention it to Stan, but I figured that on this strip, there was nowhere to go but up!” [Nashville Scene]

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Comics A.M. | ‘One Piece’ takes two-week hiatus due to illness

One Piece, Vol. 69

One Piece, Vol. 69

Manga | Shueisha’s Weekly Shonen Jump has announced that One Piece will go on hiatus for the magazine’s next two issues because creator Eiichiro Oda has been hospitalized for a peritonsillar abscess, a complication of tonsillitis. The popular series is expected to return June 10. One Piece, which has been serialized in Weekly Shonen Jump since 1997, has sold more than 280 million volumes in Japan alone. [Anime News Network]

Creators | Art Spiegelman and Francoise Mouly share their thoughts (and sometimes disagree) on their own world, the comics world in general, and digital media. [National Post]

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