Uncle Scrooge Archives - Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

What Are You Reading? with Greg Hatcher

Hello and welcome to What Are You Reading? Our guest this week is Greg Hatcher, who you can find blogging regularly at our sister blog, Comics Should Be Good!.

To see what Greg and the Robot 6 crew have been reading, click below …

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Comics A.M. | Middle-school mother objects to Dungeon series

Dungeon Monstres

Libraries | A middle school library in New Brunswick, Canada, has been asked to remove Joann Sfar and Lewis Trondheim’s Dungeon series for review after the mother of a 12-year-old student complained about the depictions of sex and violence in one of the volumes. The CTV News reporter goes for the easy gasp by showing the scenes in question to a variety of parents, all of whom agree they don’t think the book belongs in a school library, and in this case the mom has a good point: The book received good reviews but is definitely not for kids. [CTV News]

Publishing | John Jackson Miller has been looking at the fine print in old comics — the statement of ownership, which spells out in exact numbers just how many copies were printed, how many were sold, etc. One of the highlights is Carl Barks’ Uncle Scrooge, which sold more than 1 million copies, making it the top seller of the 1960s. “It’s meaningful, I think, that the best-seller of the 1960s should come from Barks, whose work was originally uncredited and who was known originally to fans as ‘the Good Duck Artist,’” Miller concludes. “Fandom in the 1960s was bringing attention to a lot of people who had previously been unheralded, and Barks is a great example. He changed comics — and now comics were changing.” [The Comichron]

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White duck’s burden?: Race in Walt Disney’s Donald Duck: “Lost in the Andes”

Fantagraphics’ announced Complete Carl Barks Disney Library, which recently began publication with Walt Disney’s Donald Duck: “Lost in the Andes” is a godsend of a comics project.

The publisher does the heavy-lifting of finding, formatting and even contextualizing the work of one of comics’ undisputed (and, in some way, unrivaled) masters and putting it all together in an easy to find and read source, making Barks’ influential work available to casual readers to either easily finally find out why The Good Duck Artist has the reputation he has, or to discover his work for the first time.

Before cracking the cover, I will admit there was one aspect I was a little leery about. Because so many of Barks’ stories dealt with the Ducks visiting exotic lands, because the stories in this collection were produced between 1948 and 1949 and because Disney doesn’t exactly have the most sterling reputation when it comes to representing diverse nationalities or ethnicities, I was sort of concerned about what the lily-white ducks would be faced with when they journeyed to South America or Africa. Or, more precisely, how Barks would present what they would be faced with.

Reading Will Eisner’s Spirit comics and being confronted by his Ebony White or Osama Tezuka’s work and seeing the various racial stereotypes that pop up in it can be a bit like finding a fly in your soup—by biting down on it. It’s great stuff, but there’s that extremely unpleasant moment you could have done without, you know?  (Also, while I haven’t read it, it’s my understanding that Tintin may have had at least one less than politically correct adventure in the Congo).

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Food or Comics? | This week’s comics on a budget

Ultimate Spider-Man #160

Welcome to Food or Comics?, where every week we talk about what comics we’d buy at our local comic shop based on certain spending limits — $15 and $30 — as well as what we’d get if we had extra money or a gift card to spend on a “Splurge” item.

Check out Diamond’s release list or ComicList, and tell us what you’re getting in our comments field.

Graeme McMillan

I’ll be honest: The first thing I’d do with my $15 this week would be to buy Ultimate Spider-Man #160 (Marvel, $3.99), just to finally see Peter Parker die. This storyline has seemed so drawn out and by the numbers that it’s pretty much killed my interest in the series, and I’m hoping that the final issue either has a last-minute turnaround that makes everything worthwhile, or else provides some weird karmic payback by finally living up to its title. Much less bloodthirstily, I’d also grab the first issue of David Hahn’s All Nighter (Image, $2.99), which rescues what was, I believe, a one-time Minx book and looks like an awesome mash-up of Stuart Immonen, Jaime Hernandez and, unexpectedly, Steve Rolston. In other words, pretty damn great. Finally, I’d pick up Brightest Day Aftermath: The Search For Swamp Thing #1 (DC, $2.99), for curiosity value if nothing else. I mean, John Constantine in a DCU book? How odd can that actually get?

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What Are You Reading?

Our Hero: Superman on Earth

Hello and welcome to What Are You Reading? Our special guest today is Nate Cosby, co-writer of the upcoming Image series Pigs and editor of the upcoming Jim Henson’s The Storyteller anthology, which will feature stories by an impressive group of talented creators.

To see what Nate and the Robot 6 crew have been reading lately, click below.

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BOOM! to launch DuckTales in May

Duck Tales #1

As BOOM! Studios says goodbye to their Disney/Pixar license, they say hello to another Disney book. In May, the same month that Marvel’s new Disney/Pixar Presents magazine hits stands, BOOM! will publish the first issue of a new DuckTales series.

The ongoing series will be written by Warren Spector, creator of the Epic Mickey video game, with art by Miquel Pujol. It’ll be set in the same continuity as BOOM!’s Darkwing Duck series.

“You want ducks? Oh, do we have ducks!” says BOOM! Studios Marketing Director Chip Mosher in a press release. “We’re taking you back to one of the most celebrated Disney Afternoon series ever aired! And with a creative powerhouse like Warren Spector and fantastic art from Miquel Pujol, this series is sure to be jam-packed with duck adventures no DUCKTALES fans will want to miss!”

DuckTales is based on the animated series of the same name that ran for 100 episodes from 1987 until 1990. It actually started its run before Disney created the “Disney Afternoon” block, predating Chip ‘n Dale Rescue Rangers, TaleSpin and Darkwing Duck, which was a spinoff of the show. Set in Duckberg, it starred Uncle Scrooge Launchpad McQuack, and Huey, Dewey, and Louie, with occasional appearances by Donald Duck, Gyro Gearloose and many other Disney characters.

You can find BOOM!’s press release, as well as a second cover for the first issue, after the jump.

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Food or Comics? | This week’s comics on a budget

Thor the Mighty Avenger #8

Welcome to Food or Comics?, where every week we talk about what comics we’d buy on Wednesday based on certain spending limits — $15 and $30 — as well as what we’d get if we had extra money or a gift card to spend on what we call our “Splurge” item.

Check out Diamond’s release list for this week if you’d like to play along in our comments section.

Chris Arrant

With $15 worth of dingy bills and loose quarters, I’d go my local comic shop and start with Thor: The Mighty Avenger #8 ($2.99). Probably the pick of the week in some circles (even for a square like me), it’s a celebration of what Langridge and Samnee accomplished – and although it’s the last issue, there’s that FCBD issue on the horizon. I’d also pick up two number ones -– Casanova: Gula #1 ($3.99) and Daredevil: Reborn #1 ($3.99). With my last $4, I’d be hard-pressed to pick between Thunder Agents #3 ($2.99) and Infinite Vacation #1 ($3.50), but would probably pick the latter –- Nick Spencer’s on both, but Christian Ward’s art makes Infinite Vacation #1 worth the buy.

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Exclusive: Fantagraphics to publish the complete Carl Barks

In what is sure to be one of the most acclaimed comics events of 2011, Fantagraphics has announced that they will be publishing a definitive collection of Carl Barks’ seminal run of Donald Duck comic stories. In an exclusive interview with Robot 6, Fantagraphics co-publisher Gary Groth revealed that the company – which announced their plans to publish Floyd Gottfredson’s Mickey Mouse comics last summer – had acquired the rights to reprint Barks’ work from Disney and that the first volume will be released in fall of this year. The comics will be published in hardcover volumes, with two volumes coming out every year, at a price of about $25 per volume.

Although the stories will be printed in chronological order, the first volume, “Lost in the Andes,” will cover the beginning of Barks’ “peak” period, circa about 1948. The second volume, “Only a Poor Old Man,” will cover roughly the years 1952-54 and feature the first Uncle Scrooge story. Later volumes will fill in the missing gaps, including his earlier work, in a process somewhat similar to Fantagraphics’ publication of George Herriman’s “Krazy Kat.”

For those who aren’t familiar with the name, the Barks library has been one of the great missing links in a time that many have dubbed the “golden age of reprints.”  Acclaimed around the globe for his rich storytelling and characterization, as well as excellent craftsmanship, Barks has long been regarded as one of the great cartoonists of the 20th century, equal to luminaries like Charles Schulz, Robert Crumb and Harvey Kurtzman. He’s been one of the few major American cartoonists whose work has, up till now, not been collected in a comprehensive, manner respectful of his talent (at least not in North America), however, so this announcement comes as extremely good news for any who read and love good comics, let alone are familiar with Barks’ work.

Fantagraphics will release an official announcement about the project tomorrow. In the meantime, click on the link to read our exclusive interview with Gary Groth:

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On your next trip to Italy, stay in comic book splendor

The Spider-Man Room at Villa Comics

The Spider-Man Room at Villa Comics

If you’ve been thinking of heading to Italy and want to stay somewhere close to the water, Villa Comics has six rooms available with a private bathroom, air conditioning, TV, minibar and a comic book theme.

Located in the Gulf of Policastro – Cilento, “the theme is ‘comics,’” their website reads, “and each room is named after a comic character. There are room in honour of: Little Nemo, Tin Tin, Spiderman, Uncle $crooge, Corto Maltese, Spirit and Dylan Dog. Each room is decorated with a colourful canvas. Whether you’re a comic fan, or not, you’ll be enthralled by the attention to detail and the way in which ‘comics’ seeks to transport its guest into the world of fantasy to which each room has been dedicated.”

The proprietor, Gianfranco Martuscelli, is a cartoonist who wanted to combine his passions for comics and tourism.

Via Joe Keatinge

Send Us Your Shelf Porn!

scrooge

Welcome once again to Send Us Your Shelf Porn! Today’s pictures come from Josh Latta, who collects classic cartoon and comic strip characters.

We can always use more shelf porn, so if you’d like to show off your collection, drop me a line.

And now let’s hear from Josh …

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Collect This Now! The Complete Carl Barks

dduck7

Someone please explain to me why, in this golden age of reprints, when every 20th century cartoonist under the sun and their dog is getting the lavish, fancy-shmancy book collection treatment, do we still not have a decent, definitive collection of Carl Barks’ work?

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Not pony tails, or cotton tails, but DuckTales

Uncle Scrooge #392

Uncle Scrooge #392

Hot on the heels of their Darkwing Duck announcement, BOOM! announced this week that another Disney Afternoon cartoon is making its return. Uncle Scrooge #392 will kick off a four-issue arc featuring the DuckTales cast — Uncle Scrooge, of course, as well as Lauchpad McQuack, Gizmoduck, Huey, Dewey, and Louie.

“DuckTales is one of the most beloved television shows of the ‘90s,” said BOOM Kids! editor Aaron Sparrow in a press release. “It’s just spectacular to be bringing it back for a whole new generation to discover and enjoy!”

The premiere of DuckTales in Uncle Scrooge #392 will appear on store shelves the same month as BOOM!’s new Darkwing Duck mini-series. The first DuckTales arc includes scripts by veteran Disney writers Paul Halas, Tom Anderson, Didier le Bornec, Chris Weber, Karen Willson, Doug Murray and Régis Maine with art by Xavier Vives Mateu, José Maria Carreras, Roberto Santillo, Cosme Quartieri, Wanda Gattino, and José Cardona Blasi. The stories aren’t actually new, but will include material produced for Europe that was never published in the United States, as well as some stories published overe here back when the show was on the air.

The popular DuckTales show ran from 1987-1990. There was also a spin-off movie,DuckTales the Movie: Treasure of the Lost Lamp, and two spin-off TV shows, Quack Pack and the previously mentioned Darkwing Duck.


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