Viz Media Archives - Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

Japanese city honors Ultraman with four statues

Photos courtesy Sukagawa city government

Photos courtesy Sukagawa city government

The city of Sukagawa, Japan, is honoring hometown hero Ultraman with not one but four statues.

The star of a 1960s television series as well as multiple manga and anime series, Ultraman is the brainchild of Sukagawa native Eiji Tsuburaya, and the city has erected four statues — of Ultraman, Ultra Seven, Gomora and Eleking — on the street where he once lived.

The installation marks the second anniversary of Sukagawa’s sister-city relationship with the Land of Light, Ultraman’s homeland in the series, and city officials are hoping that the statues will put the city on the map for tourists, especially Ultraman fans.

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Comics A.M. | Viz sees 20% rise in shoujo manga in direct market

Kiss of the Rose Princess, Vol. 3

Kiss of the Rose Princess, Vol. 3

Manga | ICv2 kicks off a week of manga coverage with a two-part interview with Kevin Hamric, Viz Media’s senior director of sales and marketing. Sales are up, with particularly strong growth in the direct market, where their older and darker series, like the Signature line, tend to do better. Interestingly, sales of shoujo (girls’) manga are up 20 percent in the direct market as well. In bookstores, as measured by BookScan, they are the number one graphic novel publisher of 2014, and they had five of the top ten best-sellers. Given all that, Hamric is genial about ceding the top spot to a Kodansha title: “Attack on Titan is #1, but whatever works and brings people into the stores and into the category is good for everybody.” In Part 2, he reveals what he expects to be the biggest book of 2015, Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past. [ICv2]

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Viz Media to publish ‘Ultraman’ manga

ultraman-cropped

Viz Media has announced the August launch of Ultraman, the manga series by Linebarrels of Iron creators Eiichi Shimizu and Tomohiro Shimoguchi.

Debuting in November 2011 in Shogakukan’s Monthly Hero’s magazine, the series is inspired by the 1966 Japanese superhero television show. Set decades later, the manga centers on Shinjiro Hayata, a seemingly ordinary teenager who learns that his father Shin Hayata was the first Ultraman and  passed on the “Ultraman Factor” to him.

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‘Boys Over Flowers’ manga is back for a second ‘season’

BoysOverFlowers-Season2-KeyArtBoys Over Flowers was one of the series that helped propel the manga boom of the mid-2000s. It’s a classic shoujo romance about a girl of modest means who goes to a fancy high school and ends up in a love triangle with two guys, one that’s haughty and one that’s nice.

Now, 12 years after the manga ended in Japan and five years after the final volume appeared in English, creator Yoko Kamio is back with a sequel series, Boys Over Flowers Second Season. And this time, it will be published online, for free, in both English and Japanese — and the English version comes out first.

It appears the story will still be set in the elite Eitoku Academy, but two years later than the original series and with a different cast of characters.

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Viz Media brings back ‘The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past’

legend of zeldaViz Media is bringing Shotaro Ishinomori’s manga The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past back to print for the first time in 20 years.

Arriving in May from the publisher’s Perfect Square imprint, the full-color edition will collect the loose adaptation of the original game’s story, which was originally serialized in 1992 in Game Power magazine. The story was re-released as a trade paperback the following year.

The story by Ishinomori, creator of Cyborg 009, Kamen Rider and Hotel, followed the overall story arc of the game, but included new plot twists and characters, including Link’s fairy guide Epheremelda and a descendent of the Knights of Hyrule named Roam.

“Many older fans recall eagerly awaiting each new issue of Nintendo Power magazine back in the ‘90s for a new monthly chapter of A Link to the Past,” Beth Kawasaki, Perfect Square’s senior editorial director, said in a statement. “While it followed the overall story arc of the original Super Entertainment System game, creator Ishinomori also added new plot twists and characters that made this a stand-alone favorite among multiple generations of fans.”

Read the next four issues of ‘Shonen Jump’ for free

WSJ2015_01_19_CoverTo celebrate its third anniversary of going digital, Shonen Jump is offering four issues for free in the next four weeks, as well as a discounted price of $19.99 for a one-year subscription. The free issues are available via the Shonen Jump website and the Viz Manga and Weekly Shonen Jump iOS and Android apps.

The nice thing about an anthology is the variety, and the Jan. 19 issue, the first to be offered for free, has a good mix of stories. There’s One Piece, the long-running pirate tale; if you’re not particular about understanding the details of the plot, you can jump right in and enjoy the kinetic, cartoony battle scenes.

Toriko is another classic Shonen Jump story, about a group of “gourmet hunters” who travel the world looking for foods that are rare, hard to get, and uniquely delicious. It’s an odd combination of battle and foodie manga, and it’s fun to see big, over-muscled guys get all weepy over a salad, as happens in this week’s chapter, or watch a gourmet dig into a bowl of “Ojiya-style eyeball porridge.” It’s amazingly imaginative, and well worth a read.

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Image, BOOM! again named Gem Awards publishers of the year

diamond gem awardsIt’s deja vu all over again for the Diamond Gem Awards: Voted on by comics retailers, the winners this year look a lot like the 2013 lineup, with Image Comics and BOOM! Studios once again taking honors as top publishers in their divisions. Marvel was named top dollar publisher, DC Comics as top backlist publisher and Viz Media as top manga publisher — just like in 2012 and 2013.

The first issue of the widely acclaimed Ms. Marvel was honored as comic book of the year in the under $3 division, and Thor #1 was the choice among pricier comics. The Amazing Spider-Man #1 brought in the most dollars, however. My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic was named the best all-ages comic of the year, Batman: Earth One took the honors as best original graphic novel, and Box Brown’s Andre the Giant was the best indie comic.

In terms of who got what, DC Comics won seven awards, Marvel won six and Dark Horse won three, including best anthology for Dark Horse Presents, another three-peat.

Here’s the full list of winners:

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Comics A.M. | Police face ‘Charlie Hebdo’ suspects in twin siege

 

Crime | Police have surrounded an industrial park in the town of Dammartin-en-Goele, France, 25 miles north of Paris, where the two suspects in Wednesday’s massacre at the offices of satire magazine Charlie Hebdo are believed to be hiding. Police say brothers Cherif and Said Kouachi have taken over a print shop and are holding a hostage, and have reportedly told negotiators they wish to die as martyrs. The Associated Press reports that a second, apparently linked siege at a kosher supermarket in eastern Paris is believed to involve Amedy Coulibaly, suspected of killing a police officer on Thursday. Police say he’s holding at least six hostages. [The Guardian]

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Comics A.M. | U.K. publisher Great Beast to close

Great Beast

Great Beast

Publishing | The British independent publisher Great Beast, which has released the work of Dan Berry, Marc Ellerby and Isabel Greenberg, among others, will close on Jan. 7. Founded in 2012 by Ellerby and Adam Cadwell, the publisher was something of a victim of its own success, as Cadwell explains: “As the group got bigger, as the books became more successful and as we widened the range of shops we sold to there became more of a need for the management and promotion to come from one or two people and Marc Ellerby and I (Adam Cadwell) happily took up that role. However, as time went on we found that the time spent working for the benefit of the group was getting in the way of us actually making our own comics, which is why we started the group in the first place… We looked at many ways of monetising the group so we could pay someone to run things whilst still giving the creators the bulk of the profits but we just couldn’t find a fair way to make it work.” [Great Beast Blog]

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Viz Media to publish Junji Ito’s ‘Fragments of Horror’

fragments-junji-ito-cropped

Viz Media has acquired the rights to Fragments of Horror, the collection that marks horror master Junji Ito’s return to the genre after eight years.

The creator of such macabre manga as Tomie, Uzumaki and Gyo, Ito debuted Fragments of Horror last year in the inaugural issue of the relaunched Nemuki magazine. The collection was released in July in Japan.

Arriving next summer as part of the Viz Signature imprint, Fragments of Horror features tales “ranging from the terrifying to the comedic, from the erotic to the loathsome”: “An old wooden mansion that turns on its inhabitants. A dissection class with a most unusual subject. A funeral where the dead are definitely not laid to rest.”

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New book celebrates 30 years of Voltron

Voltron 30th anniversary coverJust as Voltron was assembled from other robots, the original Voltron television series was put together from several different Japanese anime — and it benefited in part from a happy accident.

Debuting in September 1984, the hugely popular cartoon was developed by World Events Productions, a small television production company based in St. Louis, Missouri. Several WEP executives had gone to a licensing convention and saw three Japanese shows they thought would do well in the United States. They requested the master tapes of all three, but Toei Company sent the wrong tapes for one of them, interpreting the request for the “one with the lion” as Beast King GoLion, although the WEP team had actually meant a different show. Ted Koplar, president and CEO of WEP, liked what he saw, recalling, “There was a human side that grabbed me.” Indeed, it became the most popular Voltron cartoon, Lion Force Voltron.

Last month, Viz Media released Voltron: From Days of Long Ago, a 30th anniversary commemorative book that includes a behind-the-scenes history of the show, photos of the many Voltron toys, and a guidebook to the characters and storylines. I spoke with Traci Todd, senior editor for children’s publishing at Viz and a huge Voltron fan herself, and Beth Kawasaki, senior editorial director, about went into the making of the book.

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Comics A.M. | Turkish cartoonist speaks out about prosecution

Musa Kart

Musa Kart

Political cartoons | Turkish cartoonist Musa Kart, who was acquitted last month on charges of insulting President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, speaks out: “It’s a well known fact that Erdogan is trying to repress and isolate the opponents by reshaping the laws and the judiciary and by countless prosecutions and libel suits against journalists.” Kart faced a possible penalty of nine years in prison if he had been found guilty, and it’s not clear the case is over yet, as Erdogan could appeal the acquittal.“Unfortunately, day by day, life is getting harder for independent and objective journalists in Turkey,” Kart said. [Index on Censorship]

Political cartoons | Syrian Kurdish cartoonist Dijwar Ibrahim talks about his anti-ISIS cartoons, which are on exhibit in Iraq. [Al-Shorfa]

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Comics A.M. | Alexis Deacon wins Observer/Cape/Comica prize

From "The River"

From “The River”

Awards | Alexis Deacon has won the 2014 Observer/Cape/Comica graphic short story prize for “The River,” “a luscious, tangled, whispering kind of story” that earned him £1,000 (about $1,611 U.S.). The runners-up were Fionnuala Doran’s “Countess Markievicz” and Beth Dawson’s “After Life.” The short-story competition has been held annually since 2007 by London’s Comica Festival, publisher Jonathan Cape and The Observer newspaper. [The Observer]

Publishing | Mark Peters spotlights Archie Comics’ recent transformation from staid to startling, with titles like Afterlife With Archie and the new Chilling Adventures of Sabrina. [Salon]

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Watch Takeshi Obata draw ‘Death Note’ sketches at NYCC

obata-nycc

Takeshi Obata, the renowned artist of Death Note and Hikaru no Go, made his first U.S. appearance earlier this month at New York Comic Con, where he participated in a couple of panels, met with journalists and signed autographs. Viz Media, which played host to Obata, was on hand to capture video (below) of the artist banging out sketches of Death Note characters Ryuk and L for undoubtedly ecstatic fans.

Obata spoke with ROBOT 6’s Brigid Alverson at the convention about character design, saying, “The clothes I put the characters in obviously become part of the characters, so I am really careful about how I dress them, for sure. I take a lot of care in that.”

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Comics A.M. | ‘Kuroko’s Basketball’ blackmailer withdraws appeal

Kuroko's Basketball, Vol. 24

Kuroko’s Basketball, Vol. 24

Legal | Hirofumi Watanabe has withdrawn the appeal of his conviction last month on charges of sending more than 400 threatening letters to venues in Japana connected with the manga Kuroko’s Basketball. The 37-year-old former temporary worker admitted to all charges during his first day in court, but mpoved to have his conviction overturned after he was sentenced to four and a half years in prison. Watanabe, who said he doesn’t feel guilty for what he did and won’t apologize, acknowledged that he sent the letters out of jealousy of the success of Kuroko’s Basketball creator Tadatoshi Fujimaki. [Anime News Network]

Manga | The most promising new market for manga right now? India, where the comics market in general is exploding. Kevin Hamric of Viz Media says manga is already well known there and fans can’t get enough, while Lance Fensterman of ReedPOP, the company behind New York Comic Con, talks about the planned collaboration with Comic Con India. The one obstacle: the same one that afflicted the American manga market, Japanese publishers’ reluctance to license their properties. [The Japan Times]

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