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Kickstart my art | He had me at Nicolas Cage

Nic-Cage-Shirt

Comics creator Todd Webb is using Kickstarter to raise funds so he can create what could possibly be the greatest comic book about actor Nicolas Cage of all time:

Why make a comic book about Nicolas Cage? Because I think it would be a really funny, strange, and entertaining thing to do! Also, Nicolas Cage is probably the biggest comic book fan in Hollywood (he changed his last name to Cage, after a comic book character, and named his son Kal-El) and I have a hunch it is his secret dream to BE a comic book character – so why not? I promise to make Nicolas Cage! The Comic Book Experience the best comic book it can possibly be – it will not suck! It will SHINE!

Here’s a sample of what the comic will look like. Webb, the creator of Tuesday Moon and several other comics, has put together several prize packages for folks who contribute. For instance, the $35 package includes the above T-shirt. Go check out his Kickstarter page for more information.


Zudist Colony finale: Previous winners discuss the end of Zuda’s monthly contests

zuda-comicsWith Zuda announcing late last week that they were ending their monthly webcomics competitions, I thought I’d reach out to some of the contest’s previous participants to see what they thought of the change. I heard back from several of them — some simply responded, while others agreed to answer a few questions (hence the difference in responses below).

Those who responded include:

And here’s what they had to say ….

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Kidney Komix Kapers

Date

Jana Christy is donating a kidney to her brother, and since she can’t think about anything else anyway, she’s recording her experience in webcomic form. There are only two chapters up so far, but it’s an interesting account, enlivened by Christy’s quirky sense of humor.

Zuda’s first crossover brings together SuperTron, Black Cherry Bombshells

Sheldon_BCB

Joining in the “long tradition of comic book crossover events,” according to the press release, Zuda’s The Black Cherry Bombshells and SuperTron strips are crossing over.

“We’ve been dropping hints in both strips for a while. Last year The Bombshells appeared in SuperTron’s dream and recently connections between the King and MOM Bot were discovered,” said Johnny Zito, co-creator of The Black Cherry Bombshells.

SuperTron creator Sheldon Vella will illustrate five episodes of Black Cherry Bombshells beginning April 5. Sheldon’s stint as guest artist will connect the Armageddon events between both series and will catapult both comics into their final chapters.

“We’re really excited to finally team up with Shelly. For the longest time we’ve thought of the Bombshells as the prequel to SuperTron,” said Tony Trov, co-creator of The Black Cherry Bombshells.

This isn’t the firts time Vella has drawn the Bombshells; you can see a promo piece he did for them last year in this post. And check out another piece of art after the jump …

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New things to look at: Bento Comics

A bento box is a Japanese lunch filled with lots of delightful little treats. Bento Comics is a webcomics site that is filled with delightful little treats—bite-sized stories that readers can mix and match into their own personalized anthologies—and even compile into print anthologies, through Lulu.com. What makes this interesting is not just the business model but also the folks behind it, including Svetlana Chmakova (Dramacon, Nightschool), Queenie Chan (The Dreaming, Odd Thomas), Liesl Adams (On the Edge) and Dan Hess (Realms of Ishikaze, Angel Moxie, Weesh). (Obligatory disclaimer: I have personal and business relationships with several of the creators behind this site.)

Bento Comics

Bento Comics

Three Count | Hechinger and Muñoz pit kids vs. bears in Bear Beater Bunyan

Bear Beater Bunyan

Bear Beater Bunyan

You may not have heard of wrestler Bunyan Paulson before — he doesn’t appear on Monday Night Raw, he doesn’t have catchy theme music or fireworks as he walks down the ramp, and he’s never had a confrontation with Vince McMahon. What he does do, however, is wrestle bears — big, bad ass, scary, championship-holding bears.

Bunyon is the star of a webcomic called Yon Kuma, which was created by Josh Hechinger and Jorge F. Muñoz. “The name’s a pun on ‘yonkoma,’ those four-panel Japanese joke strips, and ‘kuma,’ which means bear,” Hechinger said. “Basically, this kid, Bunyan Paulson, spends four 22-page chapters wrestling the Yon Kuma, the four great bears who are the regional champs of human/bear wrestling.”

They finished serializing the 88-page comic on the web at the end of 2009, then changed the name to Bear Beater Bunyan for its release on iTunes and Android by Robot Comics.

I spoke with both Hechinger and Muñoz about the popular webcomic, its move to mobile devices and what comes next for the pair.

JK: How did you guys meet, and where did the idea for the strip come from?

Josh: I posted on Panel and Pixel looking for an artist, and Jorge basically had me audition for him. Somehow, my bear-wrestling comic beat out his other offers.

More than anything, this comic came from me wanting to do something FAST in comics. Garage rock, three-chord-punk fast. It was also me trying to get a handle on what I call my “Yankee shonen” style of comics; i.e. I’m a suburban white boy who grew up reading Dragon Ball Z, and it’s permanently warped the comic-making parts of my brain.

The secret influence on it would be things like the old Fist of the North Star movie, or the Rurouni Kenshin/Samurai X OAVs. Cartoons where they condense arcs and arcs of story down to two hours or a handful of episodes. The way I approached the comic was, “Okay, pretend there was this long-running kid vs. bear series in Japan, and I’m condensing it down to a four episode OAV.”

Like I said, my brain’s a little warped.

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A closer look at Oni’s Super Pro K.O.!

Super Pro K.O.!

Super Pro K.O.!

This past weekend at the Emerald City Comicon, Oni Press announced a new graphic novel series that’ll kick off in July called Super Pro K.O.!. Created by Lunar Boy‘s Jarrett Williams, they described it as “Shonen Jump meets high-impact, old school wrastlin’.”

I managed to get my hands on some of the art that Oni shared during their panel, so after the jump you’ll find several pages from the book.

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Thunderchickens to return in 2010

The Thunderchickens

The Thunderchickens

Last month The Thunderchickens were riding high in Zuda’s monthly webcomics contest, but they dropped out due to some sort of kerfuffle with Chuck Harrison, creator of NewBot, another strip in the competition.

Well, it looks like both sides have made peace, based on this comic strip by Harrison and Thunderchickens artist William Blankenship. And above you’ll see that Blankenship and Chad Boudreau aren’t done with the Thunderchickens … Blankenship teased us on Twitter with the above image.

Today is Hourly Comics Day

by Dean Trippe

by Dean Trippe

Feb. 1 marks Hourly Comic Day, where a slew of creators are posting a comic every hour. John Campbell (who is not only heading it up, but also participating) explains the concept:

on february first a bunch of people make a journal comic every hour they are awake. and then they show these journal comics to other human beings, sometimes on the internet

we will see how different people actually spend their day. some people will make beautiful comics, some ugly. some boring, some exciting.

You can find comics by folks like Dean Trippe (who drew the above earlier today), Box Brown and more in the site’s forums.

Zudist Colony for January 2010

zudaWelcome once again to our monthly Zudist Colony column, where we interview all of the competitors in the Zuda Comics monthly contest. Or at least those who choose to respond, anyway.

Many thanks to Brigid Alverson, who pitched in on last month’s column. And thanks as well to the folks at Zuda and DC Comics, who help make this column possible each month.

If you’ve been to the Zuda home page today, you might have noticed that there are only nine competitors listed. It turns out that today the first-place Thunderchickens pulled out of the competition. I went ahead and included their answers at the bottom of this month’s column, even though you can no longer vote for them.

So, let’s get to it …

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The 30 Most Important Comics of the Decade, part 1

30mostimportant

The past ten years have been significant — indeed some might say phenomenally good — for the comics industry and the medium as a whole. While our economy collapsed, the Earth got hotter, and general chaos and disaster reigned, comics finally started to crawl out of its red-headed stepchild status. People started acknowledging comics as a legitimate form of art. Librarians and teachers started showing an interest in comics, arguing that it could help generate an interest in reading among children. And lots and lots of really great books came out in a variety of genres and styles. Comics, it could be argued, finally came of age.

When thinking about how to look at the past ten years of comics — and also celebrate our one-year anniversary — we wanted to do something different. Rather than try to list just our favorites or grade them on some aesthetic, subjective scale, we thought we’d look at the comics that mattered, the ones that, for better or for worse, changed the industry, changed how people thought about comics, and changed the way comics were read and bought. Here then, is our list of what we feel to be the 30 most important (or if you prefer, influential) comics of the decade. These aren’t necessarily the best comics of the past ten years — in fact you may find a few clunkers — but rather the comics that, for one reason or another, changed things.

Here’s how we put this thing together: I came up with a basic list that I then threw to the rest of the Robot 6 crowd, who proceeded to suggest other titles and question some of mine. Once we had hashed it out and came up with a final list, we divvied up who would talk about what book. The ranking was pretty much done solely by me, so if you’re upset that comic A got ranked lower than comic B, I’m the guy to yell at.

Because our list got so long, we decided to break this into two parts. The first 15 are after the jump. The second part will appear tomorrow around the same time. Be sure to let at us know about whatever books we omitted in the comments section. And enjoy! Here’s to another decade of great comics.

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Straight for the art | Dylan Meconis’ Family Man

from Family Man

from Family Man

If you’re looking for something to read today and don’t feel like braving the Black Friday crowds, snuggle up with your monitor and read Dylan Meconis’ webcomic Family Man, which is being hosted on a new site.

Via

Zudist Colony: Talking to November’s Zuda contestants

Zuda

Every month since late 2007, Zuda Comics hosts a competition between webcomics, with the winner becoming a regular strip on the site. In Zudist Colony, I interview the contestants via email, asking each of them the same five questions, which hopefully gives you a little more insight into the strips and the creators themselves.

So here we go …

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Zudist Colony: Talking to October’s contestants

Zuda

Zuda

Every month since late 2007, Zuda Comics hosts a competition between webcomics, with the winner becoming a regular strip on the site. In Zudist Colony, I interview the contestants via email, asking each of them the same five questions, which hopefully gives you a little more insight into the strips and the creators themselves.

This time around I asked them to share which page was the most challenging to create of the eight pages they submitted to Zuda, which is the artwork you’ll see with their answers. Also, I only received answers back from eight of the 10 contestants this time around.

So here we go …

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Slash Print | Following the digital evolution

Ant Man

Ant Man

Webcomics | In case you missed it, like I did … Chris Eliopolis shares a fun Ant Man tribute comic on his website. (via Comics Alliance)

Webcomics | Alex Hoffman of the webcomics site Transmission-X discusses how webcomics are usually limited to one category when awards time rolls around.

“The issue is that since webcomics are allowed nominations in only a single category – while print comics are nominated under a multitude of aspects of comic production – webcomics are severely limited in their recognition,” he writes. “The online comics community is large and growing quickly, but as yet, all the major awards exclude them from the majority of categories. While they do honour the Best Webcomic, they do not allow those strips to compete for recognition as Best Artist, Best Cartoonist, etc.”

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