Wolverine Archives - Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

‘Worrying about the life and death of superheroes is pretty meaningless’

wolverine-death

“I think worrying about the life and death of superheroes is pretty meaningless. The search for ‘importance’ by the superhero comic audience is a problem, a disease. The only thing that’s important is story. If it’s a good story, it’s important and meaningful. Saying ‘I’ll bet he’ll be back within a week’ is to proudly affirm that you know Kermit is just a puppet.”

Wolverine writer Paul Cornell, addressing a Comic Book Resources reader’s question about the often-temporary nature of superhero deaths

Original art for first Wolverine appearance sells for $657,250

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The original art for the very first appearance of Wolverine sold for $657,250 on Friday — tying the highest price ever for a single piece of American comic art.

The final page of Incredible Hulk #180, as drawn by Herb Trimpe and Jack Abel, featured a final panel that saw Wolverine crashing a fight between the Hulk and the villainous Wendigo. The page sold to an anonymous collector through Heritage Auctions in Dallas.

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Mad inventor creates fully automatic Wolverine claws

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Just in time for the premiere of X-Men: Days of Future Past, high-energy U.K. garage inventor Colin Furze has created fully retractable metal claws that will undoubtedly make him the envy of every Wolverine fan, and the prime suspect in countless watermelon stabbings. While we can take issue with his “adamantium” claim in the video below — unless he’s also invented that metal alloy in our universe –  there’s little denying the claws are pretty amazing.

They’re 12-inch stainless steel blades activated by a Spider-Man-like palm trigger and powered by a compressed-air system housed in a backpack. Furze also shot a video that explains the entire process. Watch both below.

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This is the way Wolverine ends: Not with a bang but a hologram

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When Marvel sends Logan to meet his maker in September, it will do so in grand style — grand ’90s style — with a “Weapon Etched Holo Foil” cover for each of the four issues in the Death of Wolverine miniseries. If nothing else, you have to give the publisher credit for “Weapon Etched.” (Get it?)

“When Steve McNiven first turned in his cover to Death of Wolverine #1, we knew we had something special in our hands,” Executive Editor Mike Marts said in a statement. “A cover for the ages. What better way to celebrate this special cover than by giving it the special treatment. Just the other day I saw the process involved in creating this amazing cover — it’s really beautiful. It’s a fantastic way to enhance and showcase this spectacular cover that Steve has drawn.”

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Lil’ Logan is the most annoying pre-schooler in adorable fan art

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Inspired by Skottie Young’s popular baby variant covers, artist Luigi Monaldi created the adorable “Indestructibles” — featuring pint-sized versions of the Invisible Woman, Incredible Hulk and Wolverine — for a “baby comics” contest on treddi.com. The details are pretty amazing (click on the image below to super-size it), from the Reed Richards doll in Lil’ Sue’s hand to the splintering floor beneath Hulk’s fist to the claw marks on the chalkboard.

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England’s Wolverhampton Station becomes Wolverine Station (for today)

virgin trains-wolverine1

On a day rife with fake announcements and Photoshoppery, this April Fool’s Day prank is real (or, rather, “real”): Wolverhampton Station, in England’s West Midlands, has been renamed Wolverine Station, if only for today. It’s a stunt orchestrated by Virgin Trains and Fox to promote X-Men: Days of Future Past.

London24 explains that the station’s 65 signs underwent the change, which was even reflected in the departure board at London’s Euston Station. Other signs (below) warned travelers about the potential threat posed by mutants. (Local radio station BBC WM even got in on the action, tweeting its opposition with a poster that reads “Mutant And Proud.”)

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Hugh Jackman asks ‘Who Am I?’ in ‘Wolverine: The Musical’

wolverine-musical

Given the wounds, both figuratively and literally, left by Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark, it will probably be a while before anyone invests in another big-budget superhero musical. However, after watching this video of Tony winner Hugh Jackman singing about his Wolverine identity crisis — to the tune of “Who Am I?” from Les Miserables, naturally — on BBC Radio’s Matt Edmondson Show, I’m willing to pitch in on a Kickstarter campaign for Wolverine: The Musical.

And if that’s a success, we’ll move on to Anne Hathaway singing something about when the tigers come at night from Catwoman: The Musical

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Original art from Wolverine’s debut heads to auction

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Long believed lost, the original page from 1974′s The Incredible Hulk #180 featuring the first appearance of Wolverine will be auctioned in May to benefit The Hero Initiative.

The Associated Press reports that Heritage Auctions was contacted by the owner, who said he has had the page since 1983, when it was given to him by artist Herb Trimpe. The auction house describes it as “one of the most significant pieces of original comic art to ever appear on the market.”

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Wolverine Cat & Cyclops Cat are the cutest there is at what they do

wolverine-cat

If you’ve long wondered what Wolverine and Cyclops might be like as cats, welcome to the Internet: Filmmaker Kaipo Jones has created a pair of videos in which he envisions s cat first with indestructible adamantium claws and then with optic blasts. The world — not to mention the house — will never be the same again.

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Conversing on Comics with Ryan Stegman

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It’s been a good week for Ryan Stegman, one marked by the premiere of the highest-profile series of his entire career: Wolverine. The Michigan artist, who’s been working steadily for Marvel since 2011, has been primed to become one of comics’ breakout stars, only waiting for the right project, the right writer and the right positioning. Wolverine just may be it.

Stegman’s squat and square-jawed Wolverine shows an artist who pays attention to characters beyond just their most recent depictions. He wears his fan credentials with pride, citing influences as far-ranging as Katsuhiro Otomo, Bill Sienkiewicz and Joe Madureira, but chief among them is Todd McFarlane. Stegman has done much to establish his own trademark style, but his ability to comprehend and be inspired by McFarlane’s fluid linework has added new facets to a nuanced style.

For this edition of “Conversing on Comics,” I spoke with Stegman about Wolverine, his artistic influences both for Logan and in general, and the long road that brought him here. In the interview, conducted just after Christmas, Stegman was open about his enthusiasm for Wolverine as well as his long-term goals for himself and his career.

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Comics A.M. | Injured actor sues ‘Spider-Man’ musical producers

Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark

Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark

Legal | Daniel Curry, the actor who was seriously injured in August during a performance of the Broadway musical Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark, has filed a lawsuit seeking unspecified damages, claiming the producers and other defendants knew a mechanical lift could be dangerous. Curry was hurt when an automated door pinned his leg; he suffered fractured legs and a fractured foot, and had to undergo surgeries and unspecified amputations. The producers have insisted the accident was caused by human error and not malfunctioning equipment. [The New York Times]

Events | Japan’s ambassador to France has expressed his country’s displeasure with a South Korean exhibit at the Angouleme International Comics Festival devoted to “comfort women” who were forced into sex slavery during World War II by the Japanese military. Ambassador Yoichi Suzuki said the exhibit, which attracted about 17,000 visitors, promotes “a mistaken point of view that further complicates relations between South Korea and Japan.” [GMA News, Yonhap News Agency]

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Quote of the Day | Tom Brevoort on character ‘oversaturation’

Art by Paolo Rivera

Art by Paolo Rivera

“If you’d asked me several years ago, I likely would have spoken about some tipping point where you have too much and everything crashed. Part of that is that I grew up in a world where there was one X-MEN book, one AVENGERS book and, well, three SPIDER-MAN books (counting MARVEL TEAM-UP.) But today, I think that, while there is a tipping point potentially somewhere out there on the horizon, it’s nowhere near as close as we sometimes like to think (or fear.) What matters is the quality of the work. How many BATMAN books are there at this point, every month? How many WOLVERINE books? And still, those characters are more likely to sell better than, I don’t know, THE FLASH or STORM. The audience likes what it likes, and so long as what you produce is good, they will always be content to have more. It’s when the quality goes down that you have a problem — but you have that problem with there being only one book as well.”

Tom Brevoort, Marvel’s senior vice president of publishing, responding to a question on his Formspring about how to address character “oversaturation,” if it’s even an issue that exists

Jake Parker takes on Hulk, Spider-Man, other Marvel heroes

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A few months back Utah-based freelance designer and comics artist Jake Parker revealed a series of Marvel characters he drew–Captain America, Wolverine and Iron Man among them — for his followers to enjoy. At that time, he asked readers to suggest other characters to add to the series. The past week and this week he revealed Spider-Man and Hulk pieces he completed in response to feedback.

It is particularly interesting to see how Parker uses one dominant color to tie each piece together with the respective characters’  costumes.

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Wizard World and Marvel reveal Greg Horn ‘Wolverine’ variant

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Marvel and Wizard World have revealed Greg Horn’s exclusive variant cover for Wolverine #1, which will be given to VIP attendees at the inaugural Wizard World Sacramento Comic Con, held March 7-9 in Sacramento, California.

It’s part of a new variant cover program that launches Jan. 24 at Portland Comic Con with Neal Adams’ Miracleman #1. Under the agreement, a limited-edition cover will be available at each of the 16 Wizard World Comic Con events scheduled this year.

Limited to 3,000 copies, Horn’s Wolverine #1 will be provided free at registration to all VIP attendees at Sacramento Comic Con. Horn is scheduled to appear at the convention to sign copies.

“Greg Horn’s bombastic variant cover will hit Wizard attendees like a freight train made of pure adamantium, but it’s just a hint of what’s in store for Marvel readers,” David Gabriel, Marvel’s senior vice president of sales, said in a statement. “Brace yourself for one of the most anticipated, controversial and inevitable stories in the long, hard saga of Logan’s life.”

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Preview | ‘Wolverine’ #1 and ‘Winter Soldier: The Bitter March’ #1

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With the debuts of Winter Soldier: The Bitter March, Rick Remender and Roland Boschi, and the relaunched Wolverine, by Paul Cornell and Ryan Stegman, quickly approaching, Marvel has supplied ROBOT 6 with exclusive new looks at pages from both comics.

The preview begins with a color splash page from Wolverine #1, previously released in black and white, and concludes with an action-packed (and snowy) two-page spread from Winter Soldier: The Bitter March #1, which kicks off the five-issue miniseries set during the 1960s.

Both comics arrive in February. See the full pages and solicitation text below.

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