Wolverine Archives - Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

The Fifth Color | Who killed Wolverine?

Death fo Wolverine Skottie Young VariantSo, Wolverine’s dead. That’s a thing that happened.

It’s very easy to be blasé about comic superhero death, so I’m going to try and avoid the dismissive gestures to this event and quit side-eyeing the next one, as Secret Wars looks to be the right environment to revive a character that makes Marvel a ton of cash. Emphasis on “try.”

I can’t say this death came out of nowhere, as he’s been without his healing factor since Wolverine #7, a little more than a year ago. For the record, it was an intelligent virus from the Microverse, which is not only an awesome phrase to use in common conversation, but smart enough to suppress Logan’s mutant healing factor, and you think that would have been a bigger deal to mutantkind. If it could suppress Wolverine’s signature trait, who’s to say the virus couldn’t be used to eliminate all sorts of mutant powers (I’m probably thinking too far ahead on this)? This virus was simply a means to an end.

Wolverine’s initial weakening and eventual demise was set apart from the rest of continuity, just a piece in a larger story that strangely didn’t involve the rest of his friends and family. Sure, it was talked about in hushed tones in a few of the other books, but there was no race for the cure, no mutant apocalypse for him to sacrifice his life to prevent. This wasn’t the result of the grand machinations of some long-established villain. It was a small and humble story of one man and what he though his own life was worth. It was a good story, and well told for the most part, but it still felt as if something was missing.

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Hot Toys goes claws out with Wolverine ‘Days of Future Past’ figure

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Hot Toys has unveiled its alarmingly incredibly life-like 1/6th-scale Wolverine collectible action figure from X-Men: Days of Future Past, out now on Blu-ray and DVD (synergy!). As you can see, this is future Wolverine, so if you were hoping for swingin’ ’70s Logan, you may be out of luck.

“The movie-accurate collectible is specially crafted based on the image of Hugh Jackman as the future Wolverine in the movie,” the description states, “featuring a newly developed head sculpt, specially-tailored future Wolverine battle suit with armor parts and Wolverine’s signature metal claws.”

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Edmonton politician endorses life-size Wolverine statue

wolverine-marvelA burgeoning campaign to honor Wolverine with a life-size statue in Edmonton, Alberta, has received the endorsement of at least one city official.

“The first reaction is, this is kind of funny,” City Councillor Andrew Knack, who says he’s a fan of the Marvel character, told CTV News. “But then you realize they’re taking this very seriously. I think it’s a great idea, assuming we go about it the right approach, can’t be taxpayer dollars to fund a statue of Wolverine.”

Edmonton residents Jesse Seitz and Christopher Olivier launched the petition last week on Change.org, lobbying Mayor Don Iveson to pay tribute to one of Alberta’s native sons with a statue in City Hall, Churchill Square or the grounds of the Legislative Assembly. Although the character was long ago established as a Canadian, the Origin miniseries pinpointed his birthplace as Alberta.

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Petition calls for life-size statue of Wolverine in Edmonton

death of wolverineOnline petitions are typically met with an eye roll, but it’s difficult not to like this one: Two residents of Edmonton, Alberta, want the city to erect a life-size statue in honor of one of the provinces native sons … James “Logan” Howlett. Yes, Wolverine.

“Not many popular or exciting fictional characters are born Canadian, but superhero and adventurer Wolverine isn’t just Canadian, he’s an Albertan too,” Jesse Seitz writes on Change.org. “I think it would make a lot of people really proud to live in Edmonton and raise morale to erect a life size statue of this character in City Hall, or even perhaps Churchill Square or the Alberta Legislature Grounds.”

His friend Christopher Olivier adds, “Wolverine has been a staple of Marvel Comics for the last 40 years, the X-Men film franchise for 15 and is now considered as popular as The Avengers and Spider-Man. We believe a statue of the X-Man will only draw more people to the city if not just to see it and would make fans of the character beam with pride.”

If Metropolis, Illinois, can have a 15-foot-tall statue of Superman, then why shouldn’t Edmonton have (a decidedly shorter) one of Wolverine? And what better way to memorialize the character’s impending death?

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Prosthetic Wolverine hand comes complete (snikt!) with claws

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Here’s a terrific follow-up of sorts to the heartwarming story of Rayden Kahae, the 3-year-old boy who received a prosthetic “Iron Man” hand thanks to 3D-printing technology and the efforts of e-NABLE: There’s also a Wolverine hand — with claws, naturally.

The organization describes itself as “a network of passionate volunteers using 3D printing to give the world a ‘Helping Hand,'” and one of those is Aaron Brown, who wanted to build a hand to take to a local children’s hospital and to the MakerFaire in Grand Rapids, Michigan. As he wanted to use bright colors, and the University of Michigan’s mascot is the Wolverine, there was only one imaginable option for the comics fan.

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‘Ms. Marvel’ puts Logan to good use

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[Editor’s note: Each Sunday, Robot 6 contributors discuss the best in comics from the last seven days — from news and announcements to a great comic that came out to something cool creators or fans have done.]

The conclusion of the two-part Wolverine guest-shot in Ms. Marvel #7 is not just one of the best issues of the series to date, it’s one of the most fun superhero comics I’ve read in a while. Writer G. Willow Wilson, artist Jacob Wyatt and colorist Ian Herring start with a giant sewer alligator, throw in a Family Circus-esque climb, and end with a couple of high-profile cameos ruminating on Kamala Khan’s potential.

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Antiheroes get their own beer brands in ‘Super Drunk Hangout’

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Known on ROBOT 6 for his superhero/pop culture mashups, Brazilian artist Butcher Billy has added a little alcohol to the mix with his latest project, The Comic Book Super Drunk Hangout, in which he envisions beer brands featuring comic-book heroes, or antiheroes, who enjoy a good brew.

This collection of design concepts gather a distinctive line of heroes, antiheroes — or not heroes at all — that have in common a certain way of not being exactly the role model for your kids,” he explains. “Yet they’re in the pages of comics in your local book shop. These characters are the ones that enjoy a pint or two at the local pub before saving the world or — very often — making an even bigger mess. Like it or not, they are the interesting ones, not to mention the most fun.”

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‘Worrying about the life and death of superheroes is pretty meaningless’

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“I think worrying about the life and death of superheroes is pretty meaningless. The search for ‘importance’ by the superhero comic audience is a problem, a disease. The only thing that’s important is story. If it’s a good story, it’s important and meaningful. Saying ‘I’ll bet he’ll be back within a week’ is to proudly affirm that you know Kermit is just a puppet.”

Wolverine writer Paul Cornell, addressing a Comic Book Resources reader’s question about the often-temporary nature of superhero deaths

Original art for first Wolverine appearance sells for $657,250

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The original art for the very first appearance of Wolverine sold for $657,250 on Friday — tying the highest price ever for a single piece of American comic art.

The final page of Incredible Hulk #180, as drawn by Herb Trimpe and Jack Abel, featured a final panel that saw Wolverine crashing a fight between the Hulk and the villainous Wendigo. The page sold to an anonymous collector through Heritage Auctions in Dallas.

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Mad inventor creates fully automatic Wolverine claws

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Just in time for the premiere of X-Men: Days of Future Past, high-energy U.K. garage inventor Colin Furze has created fully retractable metal claws that will undoubtedly make him the envy of every Wolverine fan, and the prime suspect in countless watermelon stabbings. While we can take issue with his “adamantium” claim in the video below — unless he’s also invented that metal alloy in our universe —  there’s little denying the claws are pretty amazing.

They’re 12-inch stainless steel blades activated by a Spider-Man-like palm trigger and powered by a compressed-air system housed in a backpack. Furze also shot a video that explains the entire process. Watch both below.

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This is the way Wolverine ends: Not with a bang but a hologram

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When Marvel sends Logan to meet his maker in September, it will do so in grand style — grand ’90s style — with a “Weapon Etched Holo Foil” cover for each of the four issues in the Death of Wolverine miniseries. If nothing else, you have to give the publisher credit for “Weapon Etched.” (Get it?)

“When Steve McNiven first turned in his cover to Death of Wolverine #1, we knew we had something special in our hands,” Executive Editor Mike Marts said in a statement. “A cover for the ages. What better way to celebrate this special cover than by giving it the special treatment. Just the other day I saw the process involved in creating this amazing cover — it’s really beautiful. It’s a fantastic way to enhance and showcase this spectacular cover that Steve has drawn.”

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Lil’ Logan is the most annoying pre-schooler in adorable fan art

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Inspired by Skottie Young’s popular baby variant covers, artist Luigi Monaldi created the adorable “Indestructibles” — featuring pint-sized versions of the Invisible Woman, Incredible Hulk and Wolverine — for a “baby comics” contest on treddi.com. The details are pretty amazing (click on the image below to super-size it), from the Reed Richards doll in Lil’ Sue’s hand to the splintering floor beneath Hulk’s fist to the claw marks on the chalkboard.

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England’s Wolverhampton Station becomes Wolverine Station (for today)

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On a day rife with fake announcements and Photoshoppery, this April Fool’s Day prank is real (or, rather, “real”): Wolverhampton Station, in England’s West Midlands, has been renamed Wolverine Station, if only for today. It’s a stunt orchestrated by Virgin Trains and Fox to promote X-Men: Days of Future Past.

London24 explains that the station’s 65 signs underwent the change, which was even reflected in the departure board at London’s Euston Station. Other signs (below) warned travelers about the potential threat posed by mutants. (Local radio station BBC WM even got in on the action, tweeting its opposition with a poster that reads “Mutant And Proud.”)

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Hugh Jackman asks ‘Who Am I?’ in ‘Wolverine: The Musical’

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Given the wounds, both figuratively and literally, left by Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark, it will probably be a while before anyone invests in another big-budget superhero musical. However, after watching this video of Tony winner Hugh Jackman singing about his Wolverine identity crisis — to the tune of “Who Am I?” from Les Miserables, naturally — on BBC Radio’s Matt Edmondson Show, I’m willing to pitch in on a Kickstarter campaign for Wolverine: The Musical.

And if that’s a success, we’ll move on to Anne Hathaway singing something about when the tigers come at night from Catwoman: The Musical

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Original art from Wolverine’s debut heads to auction

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Long believed lost, the original page from 1974’s The Incredible Hulk #180 featuring the first appearance of Wolverine will be auctioned in May to benefit The Hero Initiative.

The Associated Press reports that Heritage Auctions was contacted by the owner, who said he has had the page since 1983, when it was given to him by artist Herb Trimpe. The auction house describes it as “one of the most significant pieces of original comic art to ever appear on the market.”

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