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Comics A.M. | MCM London Comic Con draws a reported 101,600

MCM Comic Con

MCM Comic Con

Conventions | MCM London Comic Con have announced that 101,600 people attended the May 23-25 show, which is being dubbed “the largest event of its kind ever held in the U.K.” That figure represents an increase of more than 31,500 from the May 2013 installment, and 13,600 from the October show. [MCM London Comic Con]

Creators | Kyle Anderson talks to director John Carpenter and writer Eric Powell (The Goon) about Big Trouble in Little China, the BOOM! Studios comic that picks up where the movie left off. Powell talks about renting the movie as a kid: “My sister and I would always go in there, and we’d always need to get a funny one and a scary one. Big Trouble kind of covered both of those situations.” The comic debuts on June 4. [Entertainment Weekly]

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Akadot advertises too-hot-for-Kindle bundle

It used to be gospel among publishers that getting a book banned in Boston juiced sales. Can the same be true for Kindle? Digital Manga is banking on it; the Akadot retail site is offering all three of the books that were removed from Kindle (presumably for adult content) as a discount bundle. These are print editions, and the price, $18.99 for all three, is a considerable discount over regular retail, so it’s a good deal. The Digital folks have done well for themselves out of this whole affair, as the three books in question (two of which were deep backlist) have gotten a lot of attention; advertising them as too hot for digital is a pretty shrewd move.

Send Us Your Shelf Porn!

HPIM1081

Welcome to Shelf Porn. Our guest this week is blogger and manga fan Cathy Pajunen. Cathy had posted some pics of her collection on her blog, so I asked her if she’d be interested in doing an expanded tour of her collection for Robot 6. Thankfully, she said yes.

Remember that we’re also on the lookout for holiday-themed shelf porn this month. If you’ve got some swell DC or Marvel tree ornaments, or a Naruto-themed creche, take a pic or two and send them to cmautnerATcomcastDOTnet and we’ll post them here in the coming weeks.

And now, on with the tour:

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Everyone’s A Critic: A roundup of comic book reviews and thinkpieces

Hellboy: Seed of Destruction

Hellboy: Seed of Destruction

Pop Matters has an interesting essay comparing Mike Mignola’s Hellboy series with the similarly themed Italian comic Dylan Dog.

As characters, they could be satanic siblings, or infernal in-laws: Hellboy, the Hades-born offspring of a witch and a demon; and Dylan Dog, in love with an undead woman who was likely his mother, and battling his nemesis, the devil, who could be his father. Despite their fantastic and often horrific circumstances, at heart each character is a working-class hero, just trying to get the job done.

Sean Collins grapples with All-Star Batman and Robin: “The thing really is (to quote Grant Morrison’s Mad Hatter) very much cleverer than its rep as a goddamn-Batman meme generator would indicate.”

Curt Purcell continues his ongoing look at the Blackest Night series and superhero decadence in general.

Matthew Brady enjoyed Lamar Abrams’ Remake: “It’s pretty ridiculous stuff, but always funny.”

Greg McElhatton declares Neil Kleid’s The Big Kahn “easily Kleid’s best work to date as a writer.”

Brian Hibbs was shocked — shocked I tell you — to discover that Archie #600 was a fun read: “I mean, I’m certainly a “Betty Man”, and that makes a lot more sense to me than Veronica, but Mike Uslan’s script here is remarkably crisp, as well as filled with real drama and pathos.”

Katherine Dacey on Ooku: The Inner Chamber: “For all its dramatic and socio-political ambitions, volume one isn’t nearly as daring or weird or pointed as it might have been. If anything, it reminds me of a BBC miniseries: it’s tasteful, meticulously researched, and a little too high-minded to be truly compelling.”

Kinukitty reads the yaoi manga Black Sun and says “I can’t even think about this title without kind of flapping my hands and sputtering a bit.”

Rob Clough reads and reviews more minicomics, something we all should do more of.

The Daily Cross Hatch on Johnny Ryan’s Prison Pit: “True enjoyment of this volumes ultimately seems to fall on a willingness to embrace the complementary sensibilities of ‘aw, fucking gross’ and ‘oh, fucking sweet,’ ”

KC Carlson reviews Looking for Calvin and Hobbes by Nevin Martel, a book I was completely unaware of until now.

• Finally, Tim O’Neil has some thoughts on what makes The Thing so awesome.

Send Us Your Shelf Porn!

jasonthompsonshelfporn

Welcome once again to Send Us Your Shelf Porn. It’s like the old Queen for A Day show, but with comics.

We’ve got a really special, nay, massive tour for today as author, editor, critic, cartoonist and all-around renaissance guy Jason Thompson has pulled back the curtain and allowed us to peek into his extensive manga, comics and rpg collection. I think you’ll agree he’s taken some rather creative steps in organizing and storing his collection in a relatively small space.

Is it time for him to possibly seek out … brrr … a storage center? I’ll leave that to you, dear reader to decide, as I hand the reins of this column over to Mr. Thompson:

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Everyone’s A Critic: A round-up of comic-related reviews and thinkpieces

Dave Stevens: Brush with Passion

Dave Stevens: Brush with Passion

* Dan Nadel reviews the Dave Stevens bio Brush With Greatness and in the process comments on Stevens’ work as well: “Stevens made a conscious choice to marginalize himself, to live within the bubble of fandom. He was a willful anachronism, frustrated by his chosen intellectual and artistic world but unable or unwilling to see beyond it.”

* A la Casey Kasem, Tom Spurgeon counts down (or really, up) the top 10 best comic series of all time. Quick, before you click on the link: can you guess what number one is based on this quote? “Three generations of American adults not only read some excellent comics in this magazine, they saw a great deal of an age-stratified pop culture through its lenses.”

* Speaking on Radio Canada International, novelist Miguel Syjuco offered an early (and, I think, first) review of Seth’s new book, George Sprott (click on the first part of the program link. It’s around the 12-minute mark).

* Steve Duin (who really, you should be reading regularly) has some nice things to say about Fantagraphics’ new collection of Nell Brinkley cartoons.

* The Jog/Tucker Stone review rundown of DC/Humanoids titles continues. For those keeping score they just finished talking about Enki Bilal.

* Graeme McMillan eviscerates that second half of Neil Gaiman’s two-part Batman story.

* Shaenon K. Garrity writers about her trip to Japan and how exactly she ended up there.

* Rob Clough reviews Miss Lasko-Gross’ A Mess of Everything.

* Derik Badman continues his look at Tezuka’s Phoenix series with a look at Volume 8.

* Kinukitty gets global with her yaoi coverage by looking at In the End, a German-made manga.

Everyone’s A Critic: A roundup of comic-related reviews and thinkpieces

Earth X

Earth X

• Having offered what may become the definitive critical take on Kingdom Come, Tim O’Neil looks at Alex Ross’ follow-up project, Earth X:

So, if Kingdom Come is about the reassertion of classically Juedo-Christian concepts of morality as filtered through fifty-and-sixty-year-old superhero comics, what’s the take-away for Earth X? Essentially, the story is about what happens when the superheroes begin to realize just how much their lives have been influenced by the interference of amoral space gods – down to the very ideas of morality and ethicality.

• I don’t mean to keep linking to The Hooded Utilitarian, but they have a new contributor, “Kinukitty,” who will be doing a regular column on yaoi and BL-themed manga. She kicks things off with a look at Aya Kanno’s Blank Slate:

The boy on the cover is pretty. So pretty. All the major characters are pretty. Cool, angsty-looking pretty boys with big guns. Did I mention that they’re pretty? They really are. I’m not sure who’s who all the time. I’m not always sure what’s happening. Don’t misunderstand – we’re not talking about confusion that rips space and time. We’re talking about a series of brow-furrowing, minor WTF moments that end with a quiet snort of “Oh, I don’t care anyway.”

• While you’re there I also recommend checking out Tom Crippen’s essay on Rorschach.

• Speaking of manga, David Welsh examines Mari Okazaki’s Suppli at the Comics Reporter. Also at CR, Bart Beaty praises New Wanted by Laurent Cilluffo.

Rob Clough looks at the work of emerging artist Juliacks: “It can be a bit daunting to engage these sorts of comics; they demand that you accept them on their own terms or not at all. They can be difficult to begin and adjust to as a reader. Of course, once a reader has locked into this style, the stories become impossible to put down.”

That’s definitely not a straight flush

Yaoi card deck, by Studio KOSEN

Yaoi card deck, by Studio KOSEN

Yaoi Press and Studio Kosen have produced several decks of art nouveau-style yaoi playing cards that will undoubtedly please fans of the genre.

Because of the high production costs, the publisher is first testing interest in the card decks by offering a set on eBay (at the time of this post, the top bid was $61).

(via Japanator)


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